The Tipton Daily Tribune from Tipton, Indiana on November 5, 1964 · Page 6
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Tipton Daily Tribune from Tipton, Indiana · Page 6

Publication:
Location:
Tipton, Indiana
Issue Date:
Thursday, November 5, 1964
Page:
Page 6
Start Free Trial
Cancel

PAGE 6 TIPTON DAILY TRIBUNE Thursday, Nov. 5/1964 WASHINGTON (UPI)—Htr« Is the final vott for President reported by the National Election Service. — I JOHNSON . GOLDWATER State Vote I'Pet.. Elec. Vote Pet. Elec. Ala, - (A) — — • 454,313 69.4 Alaska . 35,290 64.0 3 19,846 36.0 . Ariz 226,959 49.7 — ,. 229,868 50.3 5 Ark 273,797 56.6 6 209,937 43.4 _ Calif 3,958,150 59.8 40 . 2,659,242 40.2 Colo 47i,J31 61.5 6 295,247 38.5 Conn .'825,205 67.8 8 ' 391,684 32.2 Del .121,542 61.1 3- 77,252 38.9 D.C. -167,373 85.4 3 28,501 14.6 Fla 893"982 51.0 14 . 859,223 49.0 — Ga 475,701 45.8 — 562,602 54.2 12 Hawaii "166,132 "78.7 4 44,948 21.3 Idaho 147,955 50.9 4 142,816 49.1 111 2,757;355 59.5 26 1,875,600 40.5 -— Ind. 1,162,659 56.1 13 908,421 43.9 — Iowa . ' 726,045 '5L9 9 446,780 38.1 — Kahs 452,384 54.4 7 378,592 45.6 — Ky '669,940 64.5 9 368,934 35.5 — La 387,811 43.5 — . 503,545 56.5 10 Maine .260,058 68.8 4 117,872 31.2 -— Md. '749,127 66.4 10 . 379,575 33.6 — Mass 1,686,047 76.4 14 520,130 23.6' — Mich , 2,128,301 67.7 21 1,059,862 32.3 — Minn .987,675 64.0 10 555,712 36.0 — . Miss 53,063 12.8 — 359,693 87.2 7 Mo 1,094,591 64.6 12 600,051 35.4 Mont 152,252 59.3* 4' 104,543 40.7 — Neb ' - 292,486 52.8 5 261,567 47.2 — Nev - .'77,750 58.4 3 55,318 41.6 — N.'H. 184,622 63.9 4 104,204 36.1 — NJ "1,839,993 66.0 17 948,049 34.0 — N.Mex .192,824 59.1 4 133,186 40.9 — NY 4,785,252 68.2 43 2,226,804 31.8 — NC •' 805,731 56.6 13 631,855 44.0 — N.Dak • 139,882 58.6 4 101,121 41.0 — Ohio .2,489,071-62.8 26 1,471,856 37.2 — Okla . 520,315 55.8 8 411,272 44.2 — Oreg :. 485,008 63.9 6 273,718 36.1 — Pa - 2,99i,402 64.9 29 1,613,591 35.1 — RI 304,579 80.9 4 71,893 19.1 —. S.C. 219,613 41.3 — 311,744 58.7 8 S.Dak ' 160,218 55.7 4 • 127,570 44.3- — Tenn 636,627 55.5 11 510,630 44.5 — Texas 1;515,179, 62.9 25 893,913 37.1 — Utah 219,771 54.7 4 182,040 45.3 — Vt 107,963 66.3 3 - • 54,841 33.7. — Va 559,068 53.7 12 481,273 46.3 — Wash 709,527 62.4 9 - 427,064 37.6 W.Va 530..80S 67.7 7 253,272 32.3 — Wis 1,047,655 62.1 12 638,244. 37.9 — Wyo 76,855 56.4 3 59,371 43.6 — (A)—Unpledged: Alabama Electors 200,355; 30.6 pet. PARK CLOSED TERRE HAUTE, Ind, (UPI)— Deraing Park was closed today and - persons who havfe been there recently with pet animals were urged to have them ex­ amined'for possible, rabies. The development came . after John Rehm, 23, Terre4Iaute, a student at Indiana.^tate College, was bitten by. ai*skq'nk$Jyhich was. found in lheH)ar[- ! " The animal first"if|] by. two other student' colleges who brought'i] ence, class. But 'jschg' did 4qt want the .?nl was released again—but not before Rehm. was bitten. . Rehm, worried about the bite, recaptured the creature and turned it over to health authorities who killed it. They found it was rabid and had been infected for at least six days. Dr. Milton Rubin of the Terre Haute Board . of Health FINANCIAL GOSSIP UP! Financial Editor ,high as 80 per cent, shown by ! NEW YORK (UPI) —.The Steady flow of higher, often record, earnings reported by major corporations, and highlighted occasionally by a divi-" dend increase, has helped sustain interest in the stock market during •• a period otherwise described as a pre-election lull. Almost all classes of businesses and • industries represented on the New York Stock Exchange have shown improved figures, a reflection of steady progress of the economic system. Only a few optimists expect the bulge in the figures to. go on indefinitely. More . than a-few viewers of the economic outlook are positive in their affirmations that the sales and production' chart lines which have been on the upswing for well over.3'/4 years will, show a more level course or even tend slightly downwards by sometime- during the next year. Earnings figures now being publicized, generally reflecting third period or semi - annual results up to Sept. 30, make cheerful reading; so much so that some observers say the rise in corporate earnings may have reached its peak for the economic advance at this time.' Wright Advisory Reports, published by Wright Investors' Service, notes that three out of four of the 1,221 companies with common stocks listed on the big board, have shown'year- to-year earnings gains; further, 410 have, through the, middle of last week, reported third quarter earnings averaging 24 per cent higher than last year. This service also examined the 30 stocks which go into the Dow Jones industrial index, and estimated that the earnings of these stocks altogether have climbed. 90 per cent from a low of $25.42 in the first quarter of 1961, to an estimated $48 in the third quarter of 1964, after seasonal adjustment for the quarterly rate. At the time the survey was completed, 16 of the 30- companies had made formal reports of their third quarter earnings, and all. except Chrys- Westinghouse Electric, and 78 per cent,', by International Harvester. The service expressed belief that the "high water mark" of the recovery in corporate profits has not been reached. "In 1965, further earnings gains may be expected.. .but at a much slower rate of increase," it said. "We expect that the rise in earnings will being to slow from this point forward, and estimate only about a 10 per cent gain above a year ago for 1964's final quarter, versus the 20 per cent improvement averaged during this year's first three quarters." NEW YORK (UPI) — The approach of winter and its storms will bring a recess to the search by major oil companies for new gas reserves in the North Sea area, where millions of dollars are being committed to the quest for new. energy sources for Europe's industries and homes. It will take some truly stupendous discoveries before the proved recoverable reserves in this European area approach those of the United States. The importance of the Western' European operations lies in their ability to supply a market for energy sources in which ' gas now plays only a very minor part. What set off the great hunt in the North Sea area was the discovery in 1959 of the Groningen field, mostly in the Netherlands, some in Germany. Called one of the few really big gas fields in the world, its proved reserves total about 39 trillion cubic feet in the Dutch portion of the field, and about 2 trillion cubic feet in the German portion. The explorers believe there are more gas fields to be found off the coasts of Britain, Denmark, the Netherlands and Germany; but because winter storms in the North Sea are especially vicious, it is not expected that much progress will be made during the next few months. Natural gas now supplies only Sidebars of Tuesday Vote WASHINGTON (UPI) — The death penalty was abolished in Oregon, gambling was rejected in Arkansas and pay television was banned in California Tuesday ' in balloting on state and local issues across the nation. • In California and Ohio the so- called white backlash issue was apparent in voting on housing propositions. Akron, Ohio, voters overwhelmingly killed one of the strongest a n t i - discrimination housing laws in the nation. Californians, by a 2-1 margin, gave residential property-owners the absolute right to select or reject tenants and buyers in a vote which repealed a law Banning housing discrimination in 60 per cent of the state. Salinger Against Repeal Backers of Democratic Sen Pierre Salinger said his strong stand against the repeal referendum was one of the principal reasons for his ' defeat at the hands of Republican George Murphy. Murphy took no stand on the issue. California voters also supported, again by 2-1, a proposition outlawing pay television. Supporters said the vote showed "television is in the public do main and should remain free." But Sylvester L. (Pat) Weav er, head of California's pay television network, will test the constitutionality of the vote in the courts. He said he would continue to broadcast new movies, operas and sporting events to pay TV subscribers until he gets official notice to stop. Ban Death.Penalty The death penalty for first degree murder was voted out by Oregon voters. A proposal for legalized gambling houses for Hot Springs, Ark., was defeated. In Maryland, voters approved extension of a state public ac commodations law to cover 11 counties previously exempted The law guarantees Negroes the right to equal treatment in most public places. ™» «QWJ ——— — —— L — 7\_ I ± » **ki*x ui £^u .3 uun «J upyiik,u U11IJ ler's were higher. Since it* was;two per cent of the 4 energy con drawn, and before the end of the market week. Allied Chemical joined the higher-earnings parade, as did Bethlehem Steel, Standard of New Jersey, and U.S. Steel. Standard of California reported slightly lower per said anyone who ihadtalcen ani-!share, third quarter results, mals to the park within the 'six day, period should take,them Ao a; veterinarian, $n' the' possibility the ;p£t niiight have; been • biUcfn by .the', skunk;- *r* ; r lV ' : * f "Rehm is : taking r£biV$ 'shots. with a'difference in the number of shares .outstanding, but higher comparative figures for the nine'months sumption of Free Europe. In the United States, it supplies 29 per cent, and gas companies are actively battling to make, the share bigger. Production during 1963 was at a record level, 14.8 trillion cubic feet, in the United States, more than one-third the proved reserves figure for the Groningen field alone; and the Gron- |.ingen field represents _about 70 Increases in. third - quarter [per cent of .the total European earnings jbf this list ranged as gas reserves, ,to date. DRIVERS STRIKE INDIANAPOLIS (UPI)—Operations at three concrete companies were curtailed today by a strike of more than 200 truck drivers in* a contract dispute. The truckers, members of Local 716 of the Teamsters Union, struck Monday when efforts to. negotiate a new contract failed. Firms' affected were Ready Mixed Concrete Corp., Heston Concrete Co., and the . Conco TV CAMEOS: Mickey Mantle , r Now He's ^ B^lng Ii)^|yfra^|r Jpape By ID MISURfU. MR. Mickey Charles Mantle is a man of discernment: Many major league pitchers whom he has faced since he came to the New York Yankees in 1951 will attest to that. So will Mickey's many batting- records. When it comes to picking the right one, he has few peers. • • Despite the fact that the 1964 baseball season is. now over and interred in the - record books forever, Mickey is still faced with the task of picking- the right one. This time, however, it won't be a fast ball, a knuck- ler or a curve. As one of three judges of the "Miss Teen-Age America Pageant," to be televised from Dallas, Tex., Nov. 13 - over the CBS-TV network, the great outfielder will be faced for the third straight year with selecting the-top girl, between the ages of 13 and 17, who best exemplifies American "youth. How did Mickey, a native of Spavinaw, Okla., get involved with a girls' pageant* His explanation is simple. "The headquarters of the pageant are in Dallas where I've lived for the past six years, and the national finals are televised each year from there," said Mickey.' * * * "THE WHOLE TOWN gets behind this event. Our governor comes to speak at the telecast. Our high school bands go out to the airport to meet the contestants when they arrive. Everybody does something. "So when friends of mine, like Bedford S. Wynne, who is chairman of the board of the pageant, suggested that I get into the act,-1, felt I should join in. Besides I can't say it hurts so much. The 50 or so girls who come down for the finals are a great bunch. They're talented and bright and smart as whips." Each of the girls, according to Mantle, is the winner or a local contest in her home town, not state. To win a local contest, a girl must be between 13 and 17, a student (or recent graduate) of an accredited school and have better than passing grades. She-is judged at home on the basis of talent (singing, playing the piano, doing a dramatic reading, etc.); awareness and intelligence (competitive writ- Surrounded by "Miss Teen -Age 'America Pageant" contestants, Mickey Mantle signs autographs before the finals on CBS-TV. ten exam); originality; poise, personality, and, lastly, appearance. These standards are also employed in the national finals. Local winners are treated to a week of sightseeing, banquets, rehearsals, and judging sessions in Dallas before the Nov." 13 pageant. • Ten semifinalists will be named before the telecast. As." a judge, Mickey follows ground rules laid down by the pageant's directors. "There'are three things we have to keep asking 'ourselves," he says. " 'Am I being fair to each candidate?' I can't be swayed by hearing an Oklahoma accent or seeing a face that resembles my wife's."The second is, 'Am I deciding on all the' facts .and standards?'. A gir,} might be a real standout in talent,' but I have to account for poise and personality, too. - And vice versa. The third-question is, 'Will she really make a good Miss Teen- Age America and be a good public spokesman kids will really look .up to?" "Posture is a major consideration, too, and so is complexion," Mantle continued. "We look for good grooming', but natural, home-made grooming, not the kind manufactured in a beauty parlor. The ones that impress me are the ones that" look right at home and seem natural. "One.thing that makes umpiring, I mean judging, tough is that so many of them have that natural quality. They are really something. They are high- school girls, and maybe they've been in the school plays and faced an audience before, but on Nov. 13 they are facing about 50,000,000 people on TV, including all their friends back home plus the judges. After the telecast they always tell me how nervous they were, but you could never tell it during the finals." To the winner go such valuable spoils as a four-year college scholarship, a tour of the U. S., a convertible, a luggage wardrobe, and 50 shares of stock in a big corporation. Fortunately for -Mickey, his teen-age "girl-watching" causes no problems at home. He is the father! of four sons ranging in age from four to 11. Should something come up in the future—like a pretty daughter— we'd bet on Mickey. We've seen him get out of too many tight spots in the past to do otherwise. Distributed by King Features Syndicate Concrete Co. '.The T old three-year contract expired midnight last Sunday. ounty ion Returns 1-. f CICERO MADISON JEFFERSON WILDCAT PRAIRIE LIBERTY TOTAL Gol^wajer, ; <R)~-- \ 228( 245| 30dj •Jjfflftgi) *?(»);—•-SENATOR ~ Bofltriger-. (R). Hittkt'(D) ^VEKNOR r Rlstine- ; (R) ; •BftnigiR .(P> CltUtltUNT GOVERNOR Ryan^R)-— -.- Rtick (D) SiCRttARY OF STATE P6 .w *lK (R) ._; BAttdifr/jtb) ... OF STATE F*ancf. .$) Z ~""II ".ri OF STATE 231 242 218! 233 228 233 2161 239! 213 239 211 IT GENERAL ..,.ts .(RJ i&li&n (tt).--„-:-^.i— ftfPT, PM- INST. ~ .Belsley,: (R) — .-„ 241 208 240 212 244! 208! 246! 242 236 2261 245! 240| 229 230| 239 240| 229! 230] 238 233j 237 232] 236! 4321 331 411 309 432! 311 413 308! 416 314 407 310] 413 316; 409 307 416 2351 3281 251! 325 241 331 254 314 255' 310! 256 310 248 310 251 316 237 •320] BttMAN 5TH DIST. | ~ it, (R) . j 236 240] 305| 248] Kbiwjl,,(b.)..^. I 222| 250j 438] 320 If At JT REPRESENTATIVE I | . I &&t .-(R),, _'_.: I 242| 242| 303| 241] Clnjiser ^(D) ..— — | 214| 240| 424|.315] ClActJIt COURT JUDGE jgft #r(U) 216 j 240) 296[ 231| •243| 248| 450[ 337] jtfi*; . ... ..... Clar|';<R )r - ——- I 232| 248| 338| 258. tffiftb««: v i--:-- ... I 225| 235J 398| 30*| mmtir- — - 1 .j 1 .1. . NicUoU :'. {ft) .1— . I 2701 2581 354| 289 MltoJlek:' t>) — . „ "I 188| 228J S *7| 281 C^ifti #6triR 2ND DIST. > ! • i I I Sffibpt; (Jt)-„ L „—-_:. I 2501 272| 354| 285 or£UiJ) '^•.;..J 1 198| 206J 371J 274] C4M *Usl5fJEJrjRD DIStI . I jqMJM'' (fir — I 2441 2* BI m\ 270I Clfg#ell,(D) ....... I 210| 2321 4001 2961 2161 171 220 ! 156 209 165) 208] 161 209 160| 209 160 208| 159 207 161 204 162 177! 156] 187 146 175 159! 183] 148 187' 143 185] 145 186 144 182 146 178] .151 2ll| 178] a67|. 155 210| 180 159| 149 191| 184 185| 150] 2051 186, l69| 142] 1501 142, 142 148 129 161] 141! 149 140| 147 141 146 139 147 136 151 142] 146] 137 140 132 152] 125] 164] 131 116] 211 119 207 115] 210 128 195 121 199] 124] 197 118 203 119 201 116] 206| 114! 214 107 -216 114 211 115 152| 211 212| 191| 149] 183 164J 143] 140| 145 219| 203. 15lj 124 1501-128| 136| 200 180] 253 1% 232 182] 242 192] 227 191 228] 192] 226 189] 229 190| 232 185] 231] 190J 242] 186 236 10 166 141 168 136 162] 137 166 135 1 | 2 .79 81| 113 78| 54| 107! 73] 58| 74] ,56| 163 136 165] 133 169 132 168 132 159] 140] 164] 141 159] 144] 189] 150! 239| 153] 180| 157] 247| 148! 72 56! 74| 561 81' 101 '81! 100! 77 103 78 102| 77! 103 108! 65 113] 66 107 66 106| 64 •106] 62 108J 62 108 61 72 76| 57 104 173 177| 169j 180 169 176 178 169 176] 166 173 169 176 165 73] 76] 57| 104| 106| 174! 631 167 106| 172 64| 168] 75| 81] 105] 165 58| 115| . 68| 181 1 1361 111 139 102 141 101 140] 96 140] 97 140 97 139] 98; 139 98] 138] 100] 142 109! I I I 66| 66| 89| 140| 144 66| 127| 82| 204| 103 2:| 3 911 155 152 78] 163 87 156 85! 156 84 157 83 157| 83 158] 86 154] 89 152 80] 155| I .1 I I 731 90| 101| 163] 124] 78 57j *03|; 7f)| 181| 125| 161] J II II 721 73| 96| 161| 121| 77| 58| 120) 73| 181| 130| 161 101 98] 106 93 95] 103 104! 94 105] 93 105| 91 105| 93 101 96| 102| 97 101 94] 82 118 109 221| 175] 68| 76| 89| 163 1 149 1 84 1 99! 207J 129| 62| 115| 83j 180| 102| 152| 971 I I ' II I . I 201| 1811 69| 89] 93| 171| 147] 831 224] 120| 601 104| 76| 171 1 102| 155 I I 2141 200| 136| 1201 192| 1731 156[ l 130J 144| 204[ 239| 131| 68| 80| 98) 1651 149| 82] 611 112| 73| 176| 102| 157 95| 99] «l VI 2 .1 3 74 62 100] 169 123 103 80 66 99] 65 114 .102 72 60 96 '73 108 102 79 66 102 76 105 97 79 63 100 65 108 99 83 65 101 61 106 ' 81 64 100] 63 107 99 82 66 99 63 108 101 I 80 66| 96 65 105| 103 79 72 100J 65 112 104] 73 67| 94 69 lllj 108 73| 84] 100] 72] 100] 103] 65 72 100! 79 104 105 80| 68| 86 64| 115| 1191 64! 154 83; 138 74' 142] 78 139 136 82 82] 134] 79 137 78| 139 76 139 73 150 71 148] 851 137| 76 145] 62 161 I I I 81| 77| 99| 751 63| 98| 104J143 68 81 66 1051 67 103 57 112) 561 108 66 85 61 103 79 103| 79] 104 76] 103] 73] 104 68 83 60 104 67 83 61] 103] 78 103 80| 87 84 811 77| lOOJ 69 | 83 60 105 67 84 61 104 75 | 54 82 | 115| 75 77 54 114 83 75 63 107 75 81 401 123 66| 911 52 1151 711 541 81 I 117 781 104] 76| 102 j 78] l62| 77| 101J 681 64| lllj 107] 36| 58 140} 113 66] 111| 82 81| 98] 991 80| 74| 94| 791 72 1 521 75| 931 97| 64] 100| 109| 140| 801 1171 107) 761 1 227 227 224 233 215] 231 224 219 161! 138 166 120 154] 132 162| 119 218 223 225] 219] 226 218 226 219 221 222 235| 215| 2281 218 236 209| 180| 267! 215 231 224! 159 1221 159 122 158 1221 161 122 156| 124 163 120 153 121 157 122| 129 152! 129 1491 1481 2221 1261 97 125] 98] 124] 89] 137 88] 134 99] 124 98| 124 100| 124 .1001 121 -97 123 106 120 3,866 4,440 3,994 4,233 3,759 4,402 3,836 4,191 3,941 4,175 3,930 4,135 3,896 4,151 •3,899 4,186 3,836 4,211 3,902 4,347 100 123 121 105| 123 75 150] 105! 118! 3,764 4,352 3,781 4,443 3 ,676 4,501 4,t»12 4,197 4,102 4,024 224| 153! 1111 3,971 218| 125| 112) 4,116 On The Lighter Side By DICK WEST United Press International ' WASHINGTON (UPI) The American., electoral • system offers many advantages over .the Russian method of : filling government, offices. Not the least of .these, in'my opinion, is this: ..Under the American system, you'are not suddenly confronted with • a lot of new, names ' to learn to spell. In this* country you have two or three months between the nominating conventions and the election in which' to familiarize yourself with the names of the candidates. If you use time wisely, you can generally master, the spelling of such names as J-o-h-n- s-o-n or Goldwater during that period. If not, you have another two or three .months between the election . and the inauguration for orthographic concentration on the winner. . Spelling Assured Thus by the time he takes office, everyone can spell the name of the U.S. president This is a great improvement oyer the Soviet system, In Russia, you go to bed with one man as premier-or party leader and you wake t up with another man as premier or party - leader. (•> don't mean , you literally £o to bed with them. I just mean that changes. of that magnitude can occur overnight) . These abrupt switches cause PROMOTION FAILS tremendous hardships, particu- flwAUKEGAN, IU. (UPI)—(Fed- 1.1-1.. ' — .1 TT.J1.J Pi.t— I , . ^ , 1 w n-*u larly in the United States. Based on my own experience, I. would estimate- that it takes the average American 1 an average of 4V6 years to learn to spell the average Russian name. Two New Namat. It was only this year, for instance,, that .1" felt confidence enough. to write N-i-k-i-t-a Kb r u s h c h e v without looking it up. And then, out of the blue, they .throw, at us not one but two new names almost as anagrammatically 'perilous as Khrushchev.. ' ' I dread to think how. long it will take me to "solo" with the names of the new first secretary of ( the. Communist party and the new .chairman of the council of ministers. It is a good bet, however, that before I learned to spell LeonidllyichBrezh- n ev and AlekseiNiko- layevich Kesygin, they will themselves have been deposed. Those names look so trouble some I'll probably never get around to tackling some of the other aspects of the Kremlin shakeup, such as the ouster of M-I-k-h-a-i-1 K-h arraalov as radio-television chairman in favor of N-i-k-o-l-a-i M e s y a t- s-e-v. Don't get me wrong. I'm not advocating a return to pre- Khrushchev policies or anything like that. But sometimes I sort of long for the good old days of J-o-e S-t-a-l-i-n. Quirks (Reg. U. S. Pat. Off.) HIT BY TRUCK OKLAHOMA CITY (UPI) — Asked how he felt about the election results, Oklahoma Republican Chairman William Burkett replied: t "Not too good: Bat did anybody get the number of that truck?" eral agents arrested Mrs. Catherine J*arnell, 37, Wednesday on charges' she impersonated a woman Air Force officer. Agents said the woman had been -posing as a lieutenant and was tripped up when she promoted herself to captain. PLAY BURNED OUT LEAMINGTON, England (UPI)—The Loft Theater was destroyed hy fire Wednesday, disrupting plans of an amateur group rehearsing Christopher Fry's "The Lady's Not for Burning." I wish to thank the voters who supported me in my attempt at re-election as Coroner. My congratulations go to Chester Mitchell, and I wish him success during his term of office. Phfiip v .Nichois v..

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,100+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free