The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California on December 17, 1946 · Page 8
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The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California · Page 8

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Bakersfield, California
Issue Date:
Tuesday, December 17, 1946
Page:
Page 8
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^_ -, „"! fc: ',- , " i ^i ,*** *~ ~ V < ' *i .. <F >• V JPSCfV"! '"•: $'# ' ^i>« j ,"'.'>-' •-/ -" - < p .yt -fjrj'tx Jf. .~&"&'r I .' * ' ' , l^t^fe^plcjfeiJQiaae- -i •]•*,.-•% •^.i^gp^a^*?^-*^''""'*";'"-«•*"" > •!-:" ^" i - ; *Pli?| l T;'-iS?- : I«i -'-,- "IT- i. - - .si.ij;fH>>.B&' ;i S?-S- 1 ._V5^c*iL<L.i-L. M_-l—/• ir- ^»_, „„' i ATx>rPs-*i-flme.a;ainea.si _ ^ practical 'ftias raised the __ ~___.,—«j-,-°—r-- — *k8 smaller ~ -"*" eterfentaiyiBchpofcjn -JKern Bounty t t _ ' '- tb 5 '^ig^fich*oql"feffii;ienbyv, / Superm-' ^ ." -, jten^nt) of Jschoola" Jje^B. 1 Hart de, ^ ^ J^UB* n}nxu*ux»<iiji c^l$d: sup6rvisors r . 'wo,rfiJ4?oin^fii4v?'iI^''^ t « n ^ e i lt ' B of * /fice^-^tk:one;,p^rmanenOy"as signed to°'tne-del'|mrtfegions ot-eastern-^Kern • county/ ,^JT6e'tsi>perv!sor8,~ under two directors/"must''yislt each of the assigMfiljschobls- at "least four times a'yeaiC '»*>-'.," "-"v ' t -"K5by"f;RogerB, : supervispr r of the ^'easf^Ksm legfon, is excepted, iow:. ever.'j sJnca: her task is confined to the 'de&ertjjsehoojs'-which receive in^ div!d,ual attention. Each of the" other supervisors foiirs "ihe : desert region. . a, Rogers |or a two-week peripd,<on' ? aifotatton. plan, "and . t established ^quartera furnished by the county,* „ e^ other" supervisors are Helen Dooley,; - special . arts; ^ Harold "Tominy" Hart,;Physical education, science and general; Katrine James, special music; Russell Kenney, mathematics and : general; Glenda Liddell, social study: and general; Elcy Me- Govern, language, arts and general; J. Ray'MesBinger, agriculture and general, and Nina Jarstead, audiovisual education and 'general. ': The two directors, whose main lunc'tion jte to co-ordinate the work ot the supervisors, are Dr. Oren' Keesler, 5 audio-visual education, and Dr. , Edward Nix, secondary school co-ordinator.~ The majority of the education, program is under the supervision of Dr. Fred Zaunon, county 1 director -of education. Doctor Nix has the job of aiding students in""the secondary schools - before they_a.dyance to high school. His primary function is to give the youth an- insight into the high school program. He also aids in developing high school guidance programs, except', those In the ^ern County Union High. School district. , As co-ordinator of the Audio-visual aid program, "; Doctor Keesler also works with ithe-sraaller high" schools throughout the county; and provides, ther^BChools^with^fioUjid movies^ 'film slides ana-other'edueational material . -AH of the ^educatioa"> supervisory 3Ir.' Hart notied^ ia-^e. their mas ter's degree,'>wMi''tsvo exceptipiis and,' all 'have rqualifled 'for- Iheitf^pps The joV entail8Ja^,certain 5-anfeun •of initiativefandjg^large amonnt^o travel, Mr.,-Harfc- f emphasized;- • SJach .suffervisor is-charged -v^ath" tfie'« sponsibtltfy 'of ^aiding" the'"-teachen .throughout-the- county and ^trai to the- sehool*during the yrai; on specially-prep^rea, schedule.' .^^ Some of the 'ideas',that' teachers use to, jnake%theh-- > wprk morei;e£ ficierit- ar«(-Jx>]rrowed by, the ,super_ visors- occasionally r to" 'aid.>another instructor" whi) Is-" confronted „ -wifl a similar\problenu% Mr," Hart sale that' many *of "4he- ideaa suggested by ' the teaching' staff- sdmetimes lead to the : making 'dj.a better super visor. > rf l _ ' " " " To Improve learning '"The, prfanaiTf objective of super vision is to ^improve- the learning situation. A friendly co-operative relationship between the teacher ant supervisor makes this possible," he declared. Before the school year starts, the supervisors report to work on-Au gust 15 and conduct a series ' of workshops-foe instructors until'mid September. On 1 Saturday mornings there is a -supervision conference wherein problems of common infer est are considered. - A unique addition to the county education system la the agriculture program, which gives the rural student experience in everyday prob lems that occur in the average farmer's life. Under the tutelage of Mr. Messinger,^ the agriculture program, «is the parent of the Junior Farmer Club," an organization that reaches "those children who are too young for membership in either Future Farmers of America or the 4-H Club. Mr. Messinger explained that agriculture is not Isolated, but is ah integrated, purposeful part of the school program. New. Editor Named for Kernels of Kern Donald Dauwalder, assistant director of the county welfare department, has been named editor of the Kern County Employes Association's official, publication, Kernels of Kern, it was announced 'today. He will replace Mrs. Margaret Stanley of the county chamber of commerce whose resignation will become effective January 1. The - board of directors of the association, also voted to publish the paper monthly instead of the previous schedule of once every three months. Mr. Dauwalder will be assisted by Earl Henry. Members of the Kernel of Kern publication board are 'Alton•• "Wilson, chairman; Mr." Bauwalder, Mr. Henry, Mrs. .-- Edith Lovelace, Herbert * Evans, —1. Edna-Murphy^and Mrs.- Stanley. „=., ROUNDTABLE T _ Bakersfield District Scoutmasters _ will hold a roundtable meeting December 30 at Scout headquarters, 1836 Nineteenth street. - Marriage Licenses Granted to 13 Pairs Marriage licenses were issued at the county clerk's office to the following 13 couples: Charlie Glenn Marlow, 28, Arvfn, Dorothy Mae "Winters, "21, Bakers field; Claude Earl Ellison, 22, Leola Manning, 18,' Bakersfield; Clarence G-. Wilson, 68, Alice ZeZhna Price, 63, Taft; Raymond Olen Peters, 22, Ruth Martha Andrews', 18, Arvln; Norman Morton Sprague, 25, Jacqueline May Hager, 17, Taft;-John ~ Bates, 52, Lydia E. Miller, 47, Taft; Kenneth Blair Simpson, 20, Marion Jean Williams, 21, Bakersfield; Henry Elmer Curry, 22, Harriet Louise Kunz, 24, Bakersfield; Sill S. Congdon, 19, Nornia Henryetta Friedle, 18, Bakersfield; Ernest Slocum Ferguson, 22, San JUateo, "Edith Marie Curtis,' 16, Oildaler Robert B. McArthur, 21, Ersel A. McClain, 17, Bakersfield; Albert Edward Durney, 27, Bakersfield, Helen Dorts Tucker, 28, Calabasas; Miguel N. Canales, 37, Los Angeles, Lupe Moreno, 30, Bakersfeild. BUY NOW! SHOP tARLYI 20TH AT CHESTER E-X-P-A-NSION Never before . . , $ueh .quality at such a low price! New beauty and added protection for your watch. .Perfect, gift! Plu* FedarsI Tax fire-proof—Snow-white >H©FLAM1 COTTON.. decorated • " Cftristma$ TUll BALLS ^^ 9 u-incn Size - 41* m CeUophane WREATHS 2S4 C 11-Inch Size Assorted Patterns—CHRISTMAS j? „ Box of 21 . CHRSSTMAS CARDS.. Wrappings WitH a Memo to Mr. S. Glaus: CLASSIC COATS In gabardine or serge rate high on a lady's ij(st pf desirable ^thingar-^o'-Wear-; J n 3?, restei | Santa^'will find them in abundance at Weill's. 7They*re s lnj;Wack, brown, smoke'artd aqua .".;.^with new shoulder and sleeve deteil^VrfIangeitt|ealment-V. .with or without hand-picked lapels . . . self, fabric or novelty buttons. These" are the. coats gals wear everywhere, with everything. We"lhave them in sizes JO through 20. See them soon, Santa. * *-. * ' $39.50 to $59.50 We ill's FASHIONS — MAIN FLOOR Christmas PURESILK HOSIERY Give her a 'gift tot -*prized,'i- pure-silk, three)flirea4 Jiose, -a. gift sBe'U 1 treasurer<And'you • can do it on a budget>NOJT'at Weill's. "Sizes 8% through II, at a special -reduced-price, formerly §258 and $3^5. Now" $1.95 HOSIERY—MAIN Christmas Cheers are In order for these ADAM Hats', drastically reduced in price, just in time for Christinas giving. It isn't often that yon find such nationally-known headgear offered at these low prices. We have them in several styles, both conservative and sports models, and you're sore to find your size. Drop IB today and see for yourself! i HATS THATS| SOLD I] RECENT-LY For $ 10 W , NOW ONE PRICE S 1315 Nineteenth Street SHOPS FOB TOYS at WESLL'S That's ,J>ecause he finds there so/ many ideas about what to give good 3 little boys and girls on Christmas morning. He strokes his beard and marvels at what the toy-builders have wrought for_your particular cherubs'. Drop in today z»nd get an advance peek at what the lolly old gentleman has to offer. BLACKBOARDS, Easle- type, wooden frame, well-constructed blackboards, loads of fun and educational, too, From §3.95 JUNIOR POOL TABLES Fits on a table top, making it easy to tuck away when not in use. Two cues, six pockets and marbles for balls. $5.00 Gi'KOSPHERE' TOPS, Gaily colored tops, designed to spin at any angle. A fascinating toy. $1.00 ROLLER SKATES, Roll Fast . . > Union and Brownie skates, all steel, ball-bearing. From §3.95 TINKER TOYS, Those .famous build-it-yourself Bets, in all sizes. 35c to $2.15 PLAIWEITER DESKS Just like Daddy's desk at the office. Blackboard tops add pleasure Scat attached. $5.95 CHEMISTRY SETS for young Paslcurs. Famous Gilbert kits, all sizes, from No. 2 through No, 15. From $1.60 to $23.65 DOLLS —. Dolls by America's finest builders. Baby dolls, character dolls, dolls to gladden the heart of any little girl. From $2.95 SCOOTERS — Chip-resistant, all-steel red scooters, an action gift for active boys. From | $3.95 WOOD TRAINS—.Just right for toddlers, wood trains with four cars. $3.95 WINDUP TRAINS — Engine, caboose, two cars and a track, all of -steel $4.95 WAGONS—Heavy wag. ons, with aluminum bodies. $16.95 Also at Our HOUSEHOLD STORE 1309 Nineteenth Street Cohama Designer Platina Here we sew again COHAMA in 6 wonderfully, subtle Designer .Colors Eicli, muted in tone, Colaama Designer Colors for Fall gain even greater elegance from the luxurious texture of "5 r. il." It's a lustrous teiir-lli] ijuality rayon crepe faille favored by famous designers and home sewers for its fluid drape. Seam-tested 41/11 indies wide. AKo black, other staple %-t FABRICS—MAIN FLOOR Dohama "Fabrics are featured in HARPER'S BAZAAR, 3TOGUE,

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