The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 18, 1947 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, June 18, 1947
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Page 6
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PAGE TtfM BL*thKViL,LE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS Missing from Home More Than 60 Hours, Girl Singer Returns BTOW73, Vt., June 18. (UP) — Ressmarie Von Trapp, 18-year-old soprano member of the famous 'Trapp Family Singers", »as found safe yesterday after being missing from her home here for more than 60 hours. A family spokesman said the gtrl "wandered out of the woods and knocked at the door of a neighboring farmhouse. Indications were that she was little the worse for three nights spent in the forest. Word of the girl's safety readied her home here as sheriff's deputies searched • woodcrt Mt. Mansfield's trails and prepared to drag the little river. It .was toward this area that the girl fled from her ehftlct-likc home Saturday night, during a severe mountain storm llinl sent nit Army B-29 hurtling into htiwks mountain about 80 miles South of here, killing 12 men. Her brother and sisters c.illfti for her to come back but she ignored their entreaties us slip ran downhill in the rain toward the camp about a half-mile from the house. : Rosemnvle's unexplained flight Into tile ulglit occurred while her mother was in Boston, it came only two weeks after the death o[ her lather, Baron Georg yon Trapp, World War I commander of an Austrian u-boat fleet who Heel to the United Slates with his Inmily to escape Nazi persecution prior to World War II. The mother, Baroness Maria Augusta Von Trapp, leader or the singing family, was notified of the disappearance and flew home, ar- riving Sunday noon. The family js en relied tin- area nlone Sunday but finally called on Sheriff Potter tor aid. One of 10 children, the girl was described as 5 feet, 8 inches !al). weighing about 130 pounds, witli light brown hair braided in peasant fashion around her head. She \vr_c dark dunKaives, an Army finld juc- kel and fki boots. The Inniily established n homo here because of the area's similarity to thrir native Austria, Their house looks down from the mountniu on quaint Sluwc village which is dominated by the slender thrust of 'the spire of the white community church. Since coming to the United States the family lias participated In 750 concerts across the tuition. Directing tlip singers is the Kev. FtanjfViis- ner, a Catholic priest who has lived with the family many yrars by SP' 1 - cial dispensation of the Archbishop of Siil/burg, Austria. The mother was mystified by the girl's acl. A,UhouBh India is only a little more than one-half as large as the United Slates, it contains throe times as many jjeople. PRESCRIPTIONS Fresh Stock Guaranteed Best Prices Kirby Drug Stores Flowers for the President WEDNESDAY; JUNE 1H, 1947 Reil and white carnations vftio presented to President Tuimai'b, j- year-old Linda Williams during the President's visit to the Canaili-m resort city. An unidentified man aids Linda; others unidentified Mr Truman continued on his trip to Wnsiifnglon after a short visit ("FA Telcphoto.) -'•'-^•(S)—''AH^- ».a^gj^ia!igi!!!i. B > MATEEL HOWE FARNHAM f* TIIK STOIIY ]lmve nnntln.r i AhdUt .Mrrt. 'i'olllvcr' lihat Alinn>,rllo xhnl NrlMOn nturlM cnllln; tllvern i, Kn ln. l.'l,,r •lip l» KUJ"»T to J, Snrii nn*l Flnrn !iri-t-l. tlilK time <T'M lillln. Florit » foiilrftr. AnlT TPLORA had licr second baby 13 i months after the birth of Gloria Louise. To.'have two babies by two different husbands in a little more than ' a year certainly is something of an achievement. Otsego .professed to find it somehow slightly indelicate, but that was because the Tollivers were now [firmly established as Olsego's un- 'official but always original and enterprising entertainment bureau. h for the months before Snm's first child was born the ToIIiver family lived as quietly and circumspectly as deacons. Amy and 'Aniiabelle went to work daily. Mrs.. Toll!ver did, her housework and went nowhere except to church and across the street to sit ,wilh Flora when she was alone. Sam bad closed all of Mrs. Tol- 1 liver's accounts, and she now paid - lor everything in cash. Mr. Tol- livcr had not been heard from since Flora's wedding. .> Nelson made a habit ot calling regularly at the. Tollivers' on Tues- 'day anil Friday evenings from 3 :o'clock to 10, but ns he seemed to avoid seeing Annabelle alone ant " never took her out without including Amy, SaiVi began to breathe easier. After aft, as Sam said to Father, Nelson was a creature of habit. It had now become a hat for him to call on the Tollivers and probably it meant nothing a all. • There is no doubt Nelson en joyed these evenings. lie was al ways greeted with affectionate smiles and bright looks. The oil leather rocker, shabby but jm "jiensely comfortable, was drawr p by the firo, ready for him. Al- vays al the Tollivers' (here .was a rpfusioii of food, especially de- .CLOUS npplcs or winter pears, ickory nuts or black walnuts, aisins and -rigs, maple sugar, oughnuls that melted in your louth, sparkling cider, corn opped on the hearlh and heavily tillered, or cake or ice cronm left ver from dinner. Nelson began o put on weigh!, and no wonder. * * * 7LORA was not very well the *" next few months. She was a ood deal bored, 1 thought, a little csenlful of her heavy figure, and nearly as good company as vhcu she was carrying Gloria -onise. She spent a good deal of ime at her molher's, and I was ften invited for lunch or the af- ernoon. Flora always brought ver the baby, and Weyman nearly ilwnys came along to carry a cov- ired dish, a luscious T-bonc steak, 'reamed sweelbreaVls or oysters, a >an of broiled chickens. \Vcym; Complained to Leah a good deal ibout the slre;im of food that lowed from his kitchen to the Tol- ivors'. He said Mr. Bam \vas .hreateniiig to skin him nlive if lie Aid not keep flown the hills. Wcy- nan, however, took Die blame am lid not give Flora away. I began to clrc.id those luncheons or afternoons at Mrs. ToUivcr's and went as seldom as I decent), could. Mrs. Tolliver rarely s;m anything attcr greeting me excep to urge me to eat more. ! seemed to have soured on world. That was perhaps natural She had expected nil her trouble to be solved, once Flora wns safel marrigd to Sam. Instead, Mrs. Tot liver now had to dust and care fo an It-room house alone, thoug the girls helped with the cookin and washing up. Nelson, nfle arousing high hopes, seemed t have settled clown iis a chaiv-sille Flora now spoke bitterly of th pittance Sam allowed her. Sat had given her $200 for clothes fo le new baby. As Annabelle was oo busy to help her, Flora had make the little dresses and ndpi-thiHgs herself or buy them cady-madc. Flora had an ntnple ' ipply of baby things that had donged to Gloria Louise, but wanted her latest baby to ave an outfit lhal would knock Jlsego's eye out. She wanted ew maternity dresses for her- elf. A hundred a month could e slrelched only so far when MC ordered nil one's best things om the most exclusive — which neans (he most expensive — New P ork shops. second baby was born January, safely but with onsidcrnblc pain and effort. It .';is another girl, and Flora named er Theodora after Sam's mother. 'licodora was a good child and a \vect child, but homely and un- Itraclive. She looked like Sam nd his mother and nol al all like ^lora. In the next three and a uilf years Flora had two more -hiklron by Sam, another girl, lit- le Amy, and at last n boy, Sam ruiiior. They all looked like Sam. They were all homely and utterly Ji seemed incrcd- cotild be Flora's Free Delivery Call PICKARD'S GROCERY Phone 2043 1044 Chickasawba without charm. Me Hint they children. contrast Gloria Louise grew 1101-0 ;md more beautiful. Because in 1917 and Ifllfi prnc- .ically all the women in Otsc- .;o, young, old, nnd in between, were working like beavers for the Red Cross or the Y. M. C. A. or the c.*mlccn for soldiers at the niilroacl station, or else knitting or home, there was little time for gossip. Accordingly, OB long ns the wnr lasted, Olsego pniciicully forgot the Tollivers. 1, of course, wns an exception; I lived too close to the Tollivers to forget them, I still snw Flora once or twice a-week. Arid there was always Amy; I never forgot to keep n wary eye on Amy. Father, however, now so seldom invited Amy to the house, seemed so content with my companionship, that I often reproached myself for imagining that such a man would demean himself by marrying a Tolliver. (To Ue Continued) v/d: Be Sure! INSURE With the FIRST NATIONAt INSURANCE AGENCY inS North Second DIAL 2311 For Complete Protection CHAS. RITTNEK- BILL WILSON .f4/Av«r-- •\fj^] COPR. 1«7 nV KCA SrRi/ICE. INC. T. M. R£C. U, S u, s. PAT, OFF. 6-;a "The next time your father buys you a birthday present. —-••.-."::: ' m B°' n g to hel P him pick it out!" FRECKLES & HIS FRIENDS By MERRILL BLOSSER Yes, Yes—Go Oi\! ONE NIGHT , ON A SAFARI, L WAS AWAKENED BY W , HEAD GUM-BEARER/ ' BlG TROU5LE , BWANA. * HE SAYS . POINTING IMTO THE JUNSLg,' THEN t .MESSAGES ACROSS MANY,MAW MILES / IN THOSE DAYS TOAT JUST ONE THING ---WAR ' Club 61 Blythevllle, Arkansas — — ftlghway 61 North Dine and Dance Couples and Parties Only Open 6 Nights Weekly Owned By W. A. (Red) Bickerstaff and George Ford For Reservations Telephone 944 ••••••€•••••••••••••••••••••••••«•••••••*••••••• GATEWOOD GROCER | Phone 975 Ark.-Mo. State Line on the left at the Arch fi Ft. Pt 5th 7 Crown 1.35 2.65 4.15 Culvert 1.35 2.65 4.15 Schenley 1.35 2.65 4.15 Cream of Kentucky 1.35 2.65 4.15 Three Feathers 1.35 2.65 4.15 Hill & Hill 1.40 2.75 4.40 Old Taylor 4.35 6-90 Four Roses 2.85 4.50 57o Beer per Case $3.35 GAS, reg 17.9c;.:...... Ethyl 19.9c All Brands CIGARETTES - .--$1.35 On. Buy 'em Here! Chamblin Sales Company S«les — Studebaker — Service "First J!y Far With a Postwar Car" Don't take chances with your car or truck, wluitcvr." make you drive. Come in now and have them put uito top-notch shape by our FACTORY-TRAINED MECHANICS. Expert painting and body work. ^We cany a complete llns nf Stiide- bnker parts and accessories. WE BUY GOOD LATE MODEL CARS SEVERAL NOW <~>N" HAND — PRICED RIGHT. •--»-•---«-----------«---•-.»»---«-..»-«•-___, Studebaker builds cars and trucks that can take 1t, in passenger cars, The Champion, Commanfler and Land Cruiser. !{; Ton, 1 Ton, i',i Ton and Ihe Incomparable 2 Ton Studcbnker Truck. CHAMBLIN SALES COMPANY Your Stiirtebaker Dealer "First by Far With a Postwar Car" Will Cliamblin —KK & Ash St., Tlionc 21S3— Lev Cliaiubl'n V/ASR TTTRR8 Our Boarding House with Maj. Hooplc DRKT rr, "Twees/ 1Y\= ARe FULL OF A\S Lfwl Nf\M.e,D£FErvSbi[<i& PICKPOCKETS/ BURSLftRS, ArtD MUROERER9/ rtE CAtsiT Uf*JE E^OU&UTIWETO ",TUDV ^W CpiSE ~— AM 1 I300.VVE-D TO Lp\N!SlitSU INTrtE BAST1U.E FOR A FEW •tUE CASE Aeftl^ 15 AS PLMM AS T VOO \\IO LPiVWER. WHO COULD PQLL VOU -THOUGH THE: ENE OF friis fJE^DLS COULD M f\ vie A LIVE SELLM6 OAR5 TO M?»XB CAMEL t)R\\!&RS .' - , v=ULD IT 'WIS65 IS P£SSlNMSTlC Out Our Way By J.R.Williams DOM'T IE A B1RTH- TAKJN31MG? WITH THOSE CHAPS LL TH^TT 'J'hink Hard, iMiirmadulte '"BUT, GEMTLEWiENV SUKEl-S I MEE- WOEK. WltL KTONE FOE- ^ FEVJ p.EC<LES5 SEfVtg IN Mi fOUrH...WHEM I SUCCUWSED to THE >,SH LURE Or COtMWECIW. Ml! BY AED RYDER HtttAl BUEINS WT petlOD SPECIMKEP IM 6*&ij PICTURES,! USING <SlM6 IVM ^£SOET^^E^iT OF WHlWEEING idfMJT WCCELS. I CMl'T FEOtt ANOTHEIi AFTER. WE WM»T TO KNOW, tAE.KOONTZ.IS WKIV.T BftBY IW I92Z, SDH WUPMNTED PICTURE THM'S ViOW FPkWOUS £.5 Too BY KlKiAK ALLKY OOP Interruption I'M OC SES\1CE, L=TTIN' lOJ LIVE A FEW SECONDS LO\GE3... BUT WHEN YOU COME DCV.N, THAT'S ALL, B3OTMEB.' VIC FLINT The Skellon By V. T. HAMLIN Sonnie was in a spot she couldn't out of. But she gave it a try. IT'S MY HAT/ WEAR IT WHEN i GO RIDI THATS FUNMY. THE INITIALS IN IT ARE ' BE YOURS, COULO THEY "} BY MICHAKT. O'MAI.T.RY and HAUMI LANE NOT /.'IDtfK ANV- ( BOOV, GENTS. BELIEVE \l IT OR HOT. [ WAS JUST i\ l«v.iTm/r fORABD5.' BOUTS AND HER BUDDIES Family Matter By FRED HARMANi <5O I f\

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