The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California on December 16, 1946 · Page 11
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The Bakersfield Californian from Bakersfield, California · Page 11

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Bakersfield, California
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Monday, December 16, 1946
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Page 11
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. to Crimes, Says Expert ALBANY,. N.' T,, Dec. 16. — Lewis E. Lawes -former warden of New York state's famous Sing Sing -prison, has a one-word answer to the problems of curbing juvenile delinquency and rehabilitating criminals. ','Hope" is Lawes' word.' > "Give a man hope and you won't have a criminal. By the' same token, give a boy h'ope and you won't have tije, makings'of a criminal," he believes. "O£ course, it's up to us in the community to help," Lawes told businessmen and social workers here. ""If -we had less competition and more co-operation among our social agencies, we'd have less juvenile delinquency."' The ex-warden likes to point to the thousands of prisoners and parolees who turned out" a - "tremen- dous"-amoxsnt of war products, and the 150,000 "prisoners who saw combat service. "These men had., an incentive in war—patriotism. Give the prisoner - something worthwhile to do in peace, and rehabilitation follows. As for juvenile delinquency, the same principle applies. If a^boy has something worthwhile, and- something he enjoys doing, he won't be in trou ble," Lawes said. Home Not Enough, Says Woman Author BOSTON,, Dec. 16. . (UPJ—The American woman must be freed from social pressure which confines haf to the -home and prevents her from developing into a ma(;ure citizen, in the opinion of Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Vermont author. False" and inaccurate,' she' contends, are such time-worn phrases as "Tour home needs you—stay in in It," or "What better job have you got to do than to take care of your children?" ' For women to live only in the family, with, no outside- Interests, she says, is to exclude what produces mature character.' Modern Moonshiners Outsmart Revenuers LOUISVILLE, Ky., Dec. 13. (UP.) Moonshiners up, and down the Kentucky hollows' have figured out a new way to outsmart the "revenuers." United States Attorney David C. Walls says the old hands at making mountain dew take In a partner who hasn't been arrested, for a revenue violation. If the' still Is uncovered, j, tine man without a record takes the blame—and pleads "forgiveness. Walls says ,such a plea usually gels a. suspended sentence—that's why the government Is Insisting on sentences without suspension. Magnetic Plane to AicLOil Search . STATE COLLEGE,- Pa., Dec. 13. <UB)—Residents of central Pennsylvania soon will see a low-flying plane drop "bombs" on this mountainous region. However," the "bombs" will be merely magnetic ' detectors dropped from the belly of the plane and suspended on a cable of wires that are attached to various Instruments that fill the fuselage of the plane; The experiment Is part of a survey started by the V. S. Geological Surrey and Pennsylvania State College as well as known oil . reserves in to further the development of new Pennsylvanipv. TWO NEW CITIZENS HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 16. Cff>— Multi-chinned S. Z. Sakall, movie character actor known affectionately as '"Cuddles," and his wife, Boez- sike, are two of the newest United States citizens. • Tears glistened in both their eyes as Federal Judge ,J. F. T. O'Connor . read 'them the cath of allegiance. Born In Hungary, they came to this' country in 1939, after Saka.Il had made 105 European pictures. -* HONESTY LESSON HOT—These youngsters, who 'were allegedly burned with^a hot iron and beaten by their parents because-they t; took pennies from a piggy hank, were treated in a Los Angeles,." juvenile hall. Children by former marriages o£ JMary. Guzman and-'- ApoUnar Esparza of Los Angeles, they are (left to right)^ John and Paul Asparza and James Sabedra. " " ' -:/ •SAN- FRANCISCO, Dec. -16. Cffi)—"{ jThe' famed',San Frlancisco:Oaklanil Ibridge has,starte(l.its 'eleventh year | ^of-operation witki'traffic. experts~al-1 ir.gady. saying the'-gla nfestructure has | Ji'b'een/outgrown.; - J "'": '-, ' ^ \ """ ; -"When the' transbay 'bridge opened I 'November 12, 1S36, it_was_ hailed as-j. the , solution :to the*,. 'Oakland-San i Francisco-'traffic 'problem .for det>4 ades to "come, ,.( . -, -• 1 1 ~ -,-, -^ * , ,-"'But,in'-,10, years_,xnore' than 167,- 'oOO.OOp vehicles • crossed "the - stnre- ttirei with'-the present,daily.average 'of ''approximately.. 71,000 vehicles a day, ..three times the number han-j died, in 1936. „ A \ ~'\ \ " Q. H.'Purcell, chief state engineer when construction of the hridge be- gan.-rand now,' director- of • public works, is making a jstudy to build another crossing to-the east bay. A Joint army-navy board recently held hearings-to determine the advisability of"" building another transbay crossing.-' ^ Vt - - " " The" bridge" haslSbeen . a -financial Indianapolis Vets Solve Housing Problem on Do-lt-Yourself Basis •INDIANAPOLIS, Dec. 16. '(N.E.A.) Last winter, 100 Indianapolis veterans decided they could heat the housing shortage on their own. Today, they seem to be dping it. When they returned from the wars, they learned that there were no homes for them. They decided to build their own. Moving with speed and stealth, they picked up 153 lots in northeast Indianapolis for a song, a prayer and back taxes. It was rough, wild land. Nobody wanted It. 125 Lots In sin months, it has turned into the slickest real estate deal of the year in Jndianapolis. After paying $3000 'for the land and ?7500 in back taxes, the-veterans hired a surveyor and parcelled out the tract into lots at ?25 a lot. Each veteran could buy a maximum of two lots and could not resell for profit nor to anyone but another veteran. The last two Sundays in May, the veterans held a picnic on their land. After gathering up the paper plates, they fell to with axes and saws, clearing the land of scrub trees and brush. That saved them $500. Four Streets They assembled a construction crew" and cut through fo'ur streets. A new addition any realtor would be proud to hang a sign on arose out of the wilderness. They call it North Plaza addition and it's now worth many times the $10,000 it cost the veterans. The G. I. "Do-Tt-Tourself-Home- Builders, Unincorporated" got its start last winter, at a neighborhood gymnasium, while city hall politi-j cians were fumbling- with plans to i By BICK LEWIS erect barracks for homeless, y.eter- ans. " - ' , ~ r .-;One of the leaders of the-project, A. Wayne Murphy, /*wh*o teaches history in an Indianapolis high school, came into the deal shortly after he was discharged as a. ria.vy* lieutenant. ," * -'' He and Mrs. Murphy pitched ;in. He became treasurer, she secretary of the project. ^ Thfe group g'pt their surveys made cut-rate by a friendly surveyor'who was running for office. They had their abstracts made " en masse: by a sympathetic title company. The wives typed, 'the deeds. /Mrs. Murphy was sworri'as a notary and she notarized them.. The deeds cost 25 cents per lot, „. ~ a ~t.\ Then came the-big'night lastJune when the deeds were distributed and the new owners paid off. _, Selection of' Lots The first problem- was, the selection of the lots. Each drew a number from a hat. Low man took his pick of residential sites. • The next problem was financing the sewers. The boys decided to sell stock among themselves-and to local merchants who value their patronage. They have just about raked tlie cash to pay for the sewers ^fci all eight blocks of the new addition. Last step is building their houses. All homes must be at least four rooms with bath, can be any architectural style, .but have to conform to the city building code.. , ' They have another G. I. lined,up to contract the job. He~-~will work? on a cost plus, basis, employing the veterans themselves on the job whenever they have free time to work. Work 'done by the veterans will be deducted from the cost of the houses. £ Construction starts, .in January.' "' as. well" TIS transportation^ success, i The structure originally was financed for, $73,000,000, plus $6,00%,000 from the state highway fund for .approaches. ' In "its first decade, tolls amounting to $58,377,500 have been, col-1 lected. The' department of public ,works said that if revenue continues at, 1946 .levels, all outstanding bonds will be retired by 1952. IritisfkNewspapers |p Per Cent Bigger i LONDON] pec. 16. ~<UP.)-r-Most of Britain's .newspapers now are -50 per cent bigger than.' at" any time since the blitz, but they still-"are not j quite so large as a small-town | American daily. ,' j "Under the increased newsprint; ration' authorized in September " by i the government, four-page," one; penny papers were enabled to print i six-page editions three times aj week and eight-page" tabloids went | to 12 pages three times a week. - i WoBttUe PERSONAL MENTION MR. AXD WES. CLARENCE M, GA"BLE and daughter, Joan, have returned to their Fresno home after a visit in Delano with Mrs. Gable's mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Roth. They also visited Mrs. Gable's sisters, the Mesdames Herman Kanthack and P. J. Gilbert. FAYETTE A. MORLEY, former resident o£ Kernville, visited at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Bechtel in Kernville recently. Jlr. Morley 'has sold his property in Santa Cruz and has purchased a home in Sequel. He will visit relatives in Taft and Magunden before returning home. DR. AKD MRS. EDGAR A. TVEL- LEM of Canoga Park were recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. William Autio of Kernville for several days. Dr. Wollcm is a former Baptist minister now in evangelistic work. MRS. A. R. DAVIDSOX of Delano is entertaining her cousin, Sirs. Wil- Ham Van Atta of Lansing, Mich. MRS. DUNCAN MCLAREN of Hoi- lister is spending- several weeks' with her uncle,* Albert Hiett, and family of pelano and visiting with other relatives, Messrs, and Mesdames Robert H. Hiett,,OTr., George Hiett, Harry Hiett, and Chester Beck and their families. MRS. JOSIE HARTLEY of Wilberton, Okla., is enjoying an extended visit in the -Delano and Pond districts as the guest of her daughters, the Mesdames Ivan Asendorf and William Black, and tiieir "families, \ MR. AND MRS. CHARLES HATZ- IIAN and family of Delano"'recently had as their guests, William Hatzman, and Mrs. Rosemary Truckett, both of Taft. SYLVIA HARRIS of'rural Delano was a Thursday night guest of her grandmother, Mrs. Minnie, i TV. Smith of Delano. NORJIAN STREET of Fresno was a recent visitor in Delano. Shopping Guide Gay Yuletirf You'll find it in the YIUOW PAGES Dreading your Christinas shopping this year more than ever? Take this tip: make up your gift list, then use the Classified Directory of your Telephone Book to find the stores that handle the things you want. The IHlow Pages can save you hours _pf - weary crowd-bucking. Use them '„—and make Christmas shopping J easier. The Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company >•**»«*», t - ^ «j. *• ~ *F~ V v -^-^^ z2-> • oc*' 0 i,»i&\* w -««e8. 3> *^ _:<-«» s *•* - _ ,i ,, jfcrnB.WAK O'UAUTY 86 pwpf. 65% grain neu«ral spirits. Copr. 1946, Schenley Distillers Corp-i^YC"' ;- Installed;- Repaired '• ~: C. J. Baiimgardner , . Phone 2-3576 of 7-T048 ','.' 1302- WESHDRIVE t ,- , . ? ,K c no answer, caU after^B P..M,-,' **!• tSfte ^gfergft'tlb Caltfornfalt Monday, December 1 6, 1946 18 WORTHS TO ) SSO©,000 COLLECTION OF JUDDS f INC FURS •'••-. EVERY IMPORTANT FUR AND STYLE -j f -iMt 1 ' Jaw ' *~ ° 1. No Down Pafmefit Required 2. 18 Months to>Pay 3. Friees That Mean £?Sil Savifigi Befgre Ghristuias ONE SPECIAL GROUP Formerly Sals Price Canadian Wolf Jacket.... 149.95 69.95* Silver Fox Muff.™..; .-110.0Q 49.95* Blue Fox Jacket..,..!..; 198.95 98.95* South American Lamb™ 398.95 269.95* Muskrat Stroller „ 339.95 198.95* Russ, Weasel Coat...:......: 429.95 319.95* Russ. Squirrel Locke Coat 249.95 179.95* Russ. Ermine Coat. .1398.95 998.95* •Pins 20% Federal Tax ^ ' • ' ' All Other Purs - Scarfs • Capes • Stoles - -Specially Priced, SPECIALTY SHOPS IN CALIFORNIA . 1701 --18th Street Across Fran J»*dr« Hate! BEVERLT HILLS '«' GLENDALE * SANTA MONICA « WESTWOOB 'i ^ •v

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