The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 5, 1949 · Page 2
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Wednesday, October 5, 1949
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PAOB ,rwo •LTTHEVILLE (ARK.) COTIRXEK WEWB WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER », 1»4» U.S. Goes in Red By $1,000,000 - U. S. if That Much Won* o«This Y«ar , Than ini Oefober '48 WASHINGTON, Oct. 5. W)-Tlie government finished the first quar- fer of ThVflscal year tl.758.214.00fl WOIM off than at the same point Hew Wave of CommunistrLed Labor Violence Threatens to Upset Atlantic Pact Notions a year ago. The figures are for the three monihi ended Sept. 30. Government Kirtlneu run* on the basis of a Iia- cil yet" rt™Ur* July 1. Fiscal 19«. ended with a tl,811,440,000 budget deficit for the year. • • • . • Th» Treasury reported today the government went WWW* gover the hole during the first three month.. ol fiscal 1950. Las year I VnVil, 893.000 ahead lor the first quarter. With the final fiscal 1950 budget •- By-Leon DenneB NEA' Special Correspondent ,. LONDON (NBA) — As delegates representing forty-three million or- Banlzed workers in Asia, Africa, Europe and America met here to lay the foundation for a new anti- Comrnunlst world labor federation, the struggle for the soul of European labor cached a new .climax. The bitter conflict between the Communist-led World Federation of Trade unions and Its new rival, which Includes the American' Federation of Labor, the Congress of Industrial Organizations and the British Trade Union Congrws,- ha* been further Intensified by the recent Vatican decision to excommunicate Communists. The East-West truce achieved last June by the Four-Power foreign ministers already is little more than uld be only guesswork on the urn 'ever:^imates on! the year- deficl ranged from a conser- u official to end ec vative »2 000 000,000 figure offered tlons. "" " , Giuseppe Viltorlo, leader of the Italian confederation of Labor, recently admitted that, In the Milan region atone, his union has lost over aOfl.OOO members, "»"-'•"••- »~<«— lion, according Vitorlo's Fcderf to official estimates, has suffered ^decrease In membership from 7.000.000 to a little over 3000,000. At the same, time, the Christ Inn and Socialist Unions, startin? ifo'm scratch only sever»l months ngo, already claim 2,000,000 members. - '' • • • * Official)' unwonted, P»Jmiro' To- Kllaltl Italian Communist chieftain calls the aVtlcan's edict "an attempt U> re-enact the Dark' A?es" which will have little effect on Italian labor. Unofficially, however, .the Italian Politburo is desperately „»»:,» ...c.u, *, - seeking ways to check the massi exo- de.id letter. European labor bs das both Iron) the Pavly »n<S the threatened by a new wave of.un- rest and violence which may well up.iel the precarious political balance in the coalition-governed : Atlantic Pact countries. A .survey made by this correspondent reveals that the Pope's ?W~?; , h-one inistration .top of '7,000.000,000, or more, forecast by Senator Byrd (D-Va). •Russians, May Be Host to UN Council in '53 Russia Nations . NEW. YORK, Oct. 5. W - The New York Times said yesterday soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Y. Vishlnsky has suggested play host to the United general assembly In 1953. 8 The Times »W the suggestion was made at a dinner party Friday ,t' Soviet delegation headquarters here, after Brig, Oen. Carlos P. Romulo. president of the current session, had asked Vishlnsky whether the. 1950 assembly could convene in Moscow, . Vishlnsky pondered « moment, the Times said, then suggested 1955. The Times added: __ _ "Secretary General Trygve Lie, sitting close *>y, heprd the reply that so many delegates ha\e hope* to hear from the aloof Russians and he quickly cut in to ask Mr Vishlnsky whv not earlier than 1955 "Again R. VishlnsSty pondered^ and finally he said 1953 was all All week the delegales ha\e been talking about, temporarily shitting the scene of operations out of trie D 3. It has been suggested that the 1MO MMion be held in Paris, Mexico City, Idinburg, or some other city yet to be entered in the'still- unotfidal bidding. . The Moscow juggestlon is certain to plunge th« delegates Into dls- cmsions on the whole subject of rotating the annual assembly »es- . «Ion» from time to time. KIJZN'ETSOFF: S(rik« will "deepen the already deep capitalist eco• ' nomlo crisis." • •Excommunication' Edict" already has resulted in a mass exodus of Catholic members from Oomm'unlst- domlnated ' trade union organiza- Red Labor Federation. According to some Cominform sources, -TogliatU has -been under fire In Moscow Jor severe! week* and his days as leader of the Italian communists may be numbered The Kremlin was particularly dto- pleased with his Mluve to prevent .he Italian Parliament (rom ratifying tlie Atlantic Pact. Even'in France, where organized labor Is tadlticmaly anti-clerical (he Vatican's edict Is being felt The Communist-led COT which year ago claimed a membership o over 5.000,000, no* claims, only 2. 500.000. * * * Just how Vat Vatican edict wi aflect the Kremlin's foreign pollc- is difficult to predict. The men o the Politburo are apparently con vlnced that the long-awaited an long-predicted economic crisis 1 the "capitalist countries" is here and that now is the time to strue. This was the main theme of a speech delivered tn Milan belore « group of top Party functionaries by Vajsili Kuzuetsoff. leader of the Soviet traie unions. He also stressed the fac: that "irreconcilable economic deferences between the Amercan Imperialists and the British imperialists will further aggravate the crjiis." . The recent dock strike whfcn practically paralyzed the .Port of VJTU. It U regarded here as mer«- •.» rehearsal for bigger and better rikes in order,' »s kiunetsoff 'wid, ,o deepen 'the already d«p c»pl- VITTOKMV. Hl> Italian Labor Federation hai been hurt by the Pop«'» edict: talist economic crisis." '../ . For the moment, It Is believed here, the WFTU will concentrate on such key Industries as Shipping'and coal mining. Both industries are vital to the Marshall.Plan. A Union of Seamen and Dockers, headed by Harry Bridges, pro-Communist head of the West Coast International Longshoremen's Un.on, was recently organized in Marseilles under the WFTU. A similar "trade secretariat" for the coal mining and steel Industries Is now being formed in Paris by Louis Salllaiit. Secretary-Oener- President May Ask Step Up in A-BombOutput KASHVIIJj;, Term., Oct. S—W— President Truman will ask Congress o double the nation's atom bomb production progr»m u «n ituwer Russia'a possession of that weapon, the Nashville Tennessean reported yesterday. Mr. Truman, at the 'request of the Atomic Energy Commission will ask for emergency funds before Congresa adjourns, the paper >ald In a copyrighted Washington dispatch. - • • •, • The ABO, the article, said, wants the president to ask Congress to double Its 1950 appropriation of $378,000.000 and to okay »30,000,000 to »60,000,00fl for construction during the present fiscal year. (Senator Hickenlooper (B-Iowa) said last week In Washington that appropriations for the nation's atomic weapon program allowed In advance for Russian developments (The program from the start, he added, had been based on the assumption that Russia • sooner or later would produce atomic bombs (HIckenloop?r declared tn . the same statement that It was too early to say whether additional money will be needed for the atomic program here. «(Congress already has voted bout M.000.000,000. (Shortly before Hickenlooper's statement, chairman McMahon of the Senate-House Atomic Committee expressed the posslbilty that Appropriation for Dam At Dardanclle WASHINGTON, Oct. J. (AP) _ Whether there it a chance that money will be appropriated this •ear to start the proposed W.OOO,- 000 Dardanelle, dam WM uncertain yesterday. The house has refused to approve a Senate-amended bill including $i,. 100,000 for the Dardanelle Dam. The bill now is In the hand* of a Joint conference committe, On the house floor Monday, Rep. Tackett of Arkansas asked Bouse Appropriations Committee chaii- man Cannon (D-Mo) about pro*- pecU of the Dradanelle appropriation. Cannon replied that he couldn't discuss the matter on the floor. Unusual Gift* Distinctive Curtains See Them at th« Linen & Curtain Shop 3 i 1M So. Flrtt . Phone »* Congress would be called on for additional funds, in the wake of Russia's claim that the Soviet government now has the bomb.) London was, according to reliable information, fomented and In part financed by Moscow through the al of the WFTU, and This' "secretariat" will devote i excluslvelyto the Ruhr and the industrial regions of northern France and Belgium. • / Meanwhile, the n«w anti-Communist Labor Federation, according to Irving Brown and Michael .Ross, APL and CIO representatives on the Preparatory Commission, will be ready to enter the world labor arena next November. ',, •'• ' Oklahoman's Offer Brings "Thank You", But the Strike Goes On -NOWATA. Okla., Oct. 5. (AP) — Charles A. Whitford's offer to the struck Missouri-Pacific Railroad to KuznetsbH.'Provide'crews to operate trains be- Vtself •! tween Coffeyville, Kis.. and Clare- Senators Suggest Bomb Production Funds Will Be Available, If Needed Denver How Has Law Against Jail Breakers DENVER, Oct. S—W—It's (ainst the law now to'break out of jail or run from the custody of a policeman iri Denver. , , Until Monday night' there was no punishment for breaking away from officers. City Council adopted an ordinance providing a penalty of 90 days in Jail and a $300 fine or both for the .offense." > By Jack Bell WASHINGTON. Oct. 5. (/P^-Tlie Atomic Energy Commission can get more funds from Congress if it can show'where It can step: up the production of A-bombs, senators said yesterday. ^ ';, '..'; '..- Amid -.reports that the AEG may ask for'all addition to the $1,090,-' 120,000 In cash and contract authority already voted It this year by Congress, Senator Ferguson • (R- Mich.) said he thinks lawmakers will consider any Justified boost. "The Atomic Energy Commission has received Just about everything it has asked," said Ferguson, member of the Senate Appropriations Committee. "It seems doubtful that they could spend any more money wisely, but if they can Congress probably would grnnt it." The AKC hiis discussed with the Senate-House Atomic Energy Commission the possible expansion o some of Its' present facilities, committee members said. Thus far, however, AEG officials have not out lined any specific request for more money. that weapon. Chairman McMahon (D-Conn.) AEC Is using all ol the uranium It .Iready has pointed out that the an obtain. Some other members are said to feel, however, that an mprovement In . methods" might iring about hlghpj production of A-bomb.s. In the current year, which ends June 30, the commission received 1109,000,000 In cash and 1100,000,000 contract authority for weapons, production. Congress allowed S101,109,000 In cash and $146,283,000 In contract authority for mining and producing fissionable materials. It set up S52,- 500,000 In cash and $67,000,000 In CQjillact authority for building re- ncTors^-atorhlc piles—from which improvements In the bomb and other atomic developments could be expected-to come. For physical research Congress voted $11,159,000 in cash and. $35,862,000 in contract authority. The Nashville Tenne.ssean reported yesterday that President Truman will ask Congress to double the A-bomb production program as an answer to Russia's possession of Slaying in 1916 Brings Indictment 33 Years Later • BBCKLEY, W.Va:, Oct. 5. <A*>^- Thirly-three years ago Fletcher'Fmt was shot and killed during an?argument in Terry W. Va.i Yesterday, Doan Young, 62, was Indicted,'by the Raleigh County Grand 'jury on a murder 'charge growing.out of the old shooting, i.'-Young was arrested 'Iri White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., last summer on an- a.uault charge.. Police said an investigation showed he had been sought for rnore than three decades for the Fox killing. ESCAPED FIRE—Baby sitter Sue Broylcs, 15, led five children from a burning home and fainted. She was revived and shows them a damaged couch. Left to right are; Martha Broyles, 1, Golctle Broyles, Sue holding Nelson Meats, 10 months,' Josephine Menrs, 7, Roland Mears. Parents of the children were at church when fire started from neater, at San Diego. Calif. (AP Wivepho'to). more, Okla., got a "thank you" but rejection from the line. Whltford. dairy products dealer and former state senator, had told the road he could round up volunteer crews and make it possible for Nowata shippers to get their freight to points connecting with other •'allroads. Yesterday he received Ttord from J. C. Halpin, Coffeyville dlvbioi superintendent, that the offer was appreciated. However, Kalplh told him, It would be Impossible to operate with volunteer crews because, 'railroad workers on connecting lines would efuse to transfer or receive freight from a line "operated by strikebreakers." .. ,: faces Rape Charge .^LITTLE ROCK, Oct. 5. (ifI— A 27- year-old man was charged Tuesday with raping an elght-yeai-old frlrl In' NorthUttle Rock Monday night'. Prosecutor Edwin Dunaway, who filed the charge, said he would ask Circuit Judge Gus Fulk to commit Ocie Potter of near England, Ark., to state hospital for a mental observation. Murray and Fairless Half-Mile Apart and On Pension Ploy, Too PITTSBURGH, Oct. 5— Wl—Philip Murray antl Benjamin F. Fairies were a half mile apart yesterday. . That's . actual distance. There's j also the gap between them on ! pensions. . - : Willie the steel strike rolls on, ; aides report both President Murray of the CIO United Steelworkers and President Fairless of the U.S. Steel Corporation calmly working at their desks on routine duties. Murray's office is iii the Commonwealth Building on Fourth Avenue; Fairless is in the Koppers Building on Seventh Avenue. Murray hns the bearing of a wartime general with a carefully prepared battle plan who orders it into effect and then sits back to watch his strategy being carried out. Fairless the executive is occupied with the same business routine that took his time .before the strike. No negotiation or mediation sessions are scheduled. Both are letting nature take its course tounrd the present.. . The Moslem University at Al- Azhar,. in Cairo, Egypt, was established in 910 A.D. SUXC. . . womtn who tak« Cardul know how ilmpl* function&l monthly periodic pains and nervoujneu CAA b« soothed and calmed. Cardul hu been woman's ally Tor 67 year* Today Cardul 1* bettered by accurate LABORATORY CONTROL. Modern research provides i •" check on every bottle of Cardul. That's win- million* of women prefer Cardul. It acts two -waya: (l) taVe as directed , to re luce pain due to ipasmi of functional organ; also *ld» lit SOOTHING nervout ..... tom» upset by sympathetfc r»- Rttlor\: (2) taken regularly H functional monthly dlalre^a. Buy Cardnt by nama from your dnjr- fist, today. Hillbilly Jamboree & Dance •LEGION ARENA SAT. OCT. 8 with SKIP SKIPPER and All the Boys —featuring—• . • Miss Sally Carter and Cicero Carter Those Who Like to Square Dane* Are Cordially Invited! Adm. Adults 75c - Children 25c This Adm. Includes Both Show & Dance A modern, m*di. col Iy. i«undtr*<ri- manl Dial «*(• rwri fMitUft - Sign of Fast Starts and Long Mileage... THSBE'S we SIGN 1 BELIEVE •INI YSS.SIB, I KEEPW EYS PEELED tOK T»W PWLUP3 tt Sli-W.' I DO PLENTY Of LOW4 DISTANCE DRIVING AMO 1 KNOW THE OIFFEREMC* IN GASOLINES.' rrs COWTWX.THAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE, RIGHT PHILLIPS £414 CONTROLLED FOR COOLER WtATHERTO GIVE SO(J E«V ANO PUNTV OFA11LESTDTHE TANKFUL! IT MEAN* PHILLIPS 66 15 BLEMKED WITH MORE OFTHfHrsHVOOriLITV ELEMENTS THAT GIVB FAST PICK-UP AND SMOOTH POWER! vouU. FCFL THE WHAT5 ALL THIS BUSINESS ABOUT BEST <?OAD TO MADISON KKK3WVOOR KOAW.'TWWK* ~->t. F0STHEHELP; <3ETDOWU FROM TME*?e, •moMAs, OR FAN-BELT TO VOL)/ (iayle's swallowd a fcotty j»ii! When her two-year-old daughter swallowed a bobby pin late one evening, Mrs. Chenoweth rushed to the telephone—and this series of caBs followed. She says that she wouldn't even try to guess what these calls were really worth to her. But she can teli you what lier actual cost was— las than 2c each! Mrs. Chenoweth knows the cost because she kept an accurate'.record of all her telephone conversations, then checked it against her monthly bill. 1 never realized before," she reports, "how much the telephone helps me run our house, keep in touch with otir friends and meet emergencies,. It's » real bargain!" To Mrs: Chenoweth's verdict, may "we add: We're doing our best to make your telephone service a real bargain today . : . and to keep it growing in value every year. Southwestern Bell Telephone Company. Who* •(>• giv»« w much f«r to fiffU? Called Gayle's doctor. Bui he isn't home! Got mir family doctor. Cayle's not c/toJv'ing, jo .. no reai danger! OUR ; tO TELEPHO Nunn Provision Co. Mn George OiBnowBlf 4454 S. Complon Aveni Si. louii 11, Miuouri In England It's the Chemist Shop In France It's the Apothecary Shop In Blytheville It's BARNEY'S DRUG STORE For Expert Prescription Service Yoo t« high-levtl ptrformirvce from your c«r nfl Vcun/whcn TOO relj on Phillips 66 Gasoline. It's (**- Irtl/tJ [o give TOO the volatility needed for «sy surting, Huick wtrm-up »nd smooili power, in winter, summer, spring or fall. Yes, ii's smict to stop where you sec the "Sign of the Sixty-Six." **fc for PHILLIPS 66 GASOLINE Home from X-ratf. Called my husband* Gayle's fine} diyh's doctor called. Bring her in for'X-ray tn the morning. \ for an X-ray The phone rang the rest of the Jatj-the family and friends colling to ask about Gayie. A/y .ftrffr-in-fait) Dad \fij ricffi/ifcrtr Mif attttt Soybean Sacks new 10 oz. FALL SEEDS Alfalfa, Rye, 'Wheat, Oats & Velth BLYTHEVILLE SOYBEAN CORP. 1800 W. Main St. Phone 8515 - 857 STABBS Service Refrigeration and OIL STOVE REPAIR Phones 2559-554 Blylheville Willys Sales Co. 410 E. Alain IF YOU LIKE THE BEST TRY NU-WA LAUNDRY-CLEANERS 4UOUJ . DEFOLIATE . .'by, AIRPLANE Perfect coverage. Defoliant available at competitive prices. SCRAPE AGRICULTURAL SERVICE 2 Miles Smith of Hlylheville Phone I3S8

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