The Daily News Leader from Staunton, Virginia on August 28, 2016 · Page B1
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The Daily News Leader from Staunton, Virginia · Page B1

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Staunton, Virginia
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Sunday, August 28, 2016
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Page B1
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SUNDAY,AUGUST28,2016•THE NEWS LEADER•WWW.NEWSLEADER.COM PAGE1,SECTIONB LOCAL & STATE NEWS DIRECTOR: WILLIAM RAMSEY, WRAMSEY@NEWSLEADER.COM, @WMRAMSEY ON TWITTER MIKE TRIPP/THE NEWS LEADER The view from Black Rock Summit in the Shenandoah National Forest along the Skyline Drive. If you have a wide-format photo of the area you’d like to share in Valley View, contact staff photographer Mike Tripp at mtripp@newsleader.com. VALLEY VIEW STAUNTON — Judi Patterson had a number of questions about the storage problems and electrical issues at the Augusta County Courthouse which is why she and a dozen other people went on a c ourthouse tour Saturday. “I moved back to the area after being gone for about 40 years,” Patterson said. “I have a real concern about this piece of history being sidelined and taken out of the city of Staunton.” Patterson, who lives in Staunton, said it is obvious there is a storage problem at the courthouse, but she wanted to know what viable options had been looked at before moving the courthouse to Verona. “I think they need to look at more practical things,” she said. “I’m looking at this building next door that is for sale and to me, that would be a far less expen- s ive way to store our records right next t o our precious buildings.” C ounty officials said they were happy with the number of people interested in touring the courthouse on Saturday. “It’s been a good day,” said Carolyn Bragg, Augusta County Board of Supervisors chairwoman. “We really did not know what to e xpect. We had people that came out looking for information like renovation versus the cost of staying.” More than 50 people participated in the tours, according to a sheriff deputy monitoring courthouse security. The free tours were given to the public to provide information b efore a referendum vote in November. Dozens tour Augusta Co. courthouse TRACI MOYER TMOYER@NEWSLEADER.COM TRACI MOYER/THE NEWS LEADER Augusta County Circuit Court Clerk Carol M. Brydge leads a small group of people through the Augusta County Courthouse on Saturday. Free tours were given to the public on Saturday. “We had people that came out looking for information...” CAROLYN BRAGG AUGUSTA CO. BOARD OF SUPERVISORS CHAIRWOMAN SeeTour, Page3B TRACI MOYER/THE NEWS LEADER Nils Westergard, 24, of Richmond takes a break from the heat while painting a mural. His work was one of several featured at the Virginia Street Arts Festival in Waynesboro on Saturday. Live music, food and living graffiti were among the activities. Faces and facades Aside from crab grass and foxtail, the lawn and garden weeding season is winding down with the daily high temps. Whew! A“professional weeder” of dead wood, of a sort, has been mowing through the stacks at Martha Stackhouse G rafton Library this summer. Currently, Paula Kiser, an instruction and electronic resources librarian at Mary Baldwin U, is in speed weeder mode, culling the shelves in the Qs, Rs, Ss, Ts,… Come the Z s the job gets much tougher and slower. The root of the challenge stretches deep- e r in that section, and the consequences of her thoughts and actions stretch further. Thinning a library’s old books is like p ulling up Taraxacum officinale. That’s a v ery common weed that has medicinal, culinary, and aesthetic purposes, though mostly we think of it a pain in the grass. As weeds go, it’s a dandy. The work of pulling “piss-en-lit”, one of Taraxacum’s many nicknames, can be exhausting, physically and emotionally. Any gardener, and a librarian culling away, can tell you that. K iser — who, incidentally, is a founder of the Rocktown Rollers, Harrisonburg’s roller derby team — has been making tough calls about what books to pull. Weeded tomes get shipped to Better World Books, which sends them for reading in other lands. She sometimes strug- g les over which are the appropriate titles to keep for future research at the former college and “new” university in town. She’s been in the library science pro- f ession since earning a master’s in science information systems from the Univ ersity of Tennessee in 2012. Kiser also holds a masters in arts and history from JMU, where she plied her trade in the library for four years before coming to B aldwin in 2015. T he mother of a 4-year-old son, Kiser spent her own childhood in New Jersey, Santiago (four formative years), and No- Va (for high school). The weeder of the Grafton stacks has aclear passion for her profession. Here is what she has to say: (Library science) is like a calling. It’s the perfect combination of helping peo- p le to find the answers to their questions, and improving accessibility to information. It’s helping people connect to the information that they need in the way that they need it. There’s this extreme sense of satisfaction, of a job well done: getting a re- s earch question when someone doesn’t even know where to start, and, by the end, you’ve explained to them how to ask the right type of question. It’s not just you telling them the an- s wer. You’ve worked with them in a way so t hat they learned how they can take those skills and apply them to other questions and problems in the future. Achapter about the Grim Weeder Bruce Dorries SeeWeeder, Page3B RICHMOND — Virginia Republicans will choose their 2017 nominees for governor and other statewide offices in a primary instead of a convention, the party’s governing body de- c ided Saturday in an about-face that infuriated some grass-roots activists. The decision was made in a 41-to-40 vote after a passionate, hour-long debate. The switch to the primary was v iewed as a betrayal by some grassroots activists because the party had r ecommended making its 2017 picks by convention just over a year ago. State-run primaries are held in GOP opts for primary in Va. over c onvention LAURA VOZZELLA WASHINGTON POST SeePrimary, Page3B

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