The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 15, 1949 · Page 13
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 13

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, September 15, 1949
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Page 13
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1949 New Sauce Ideas Help Vegetables Cabbage Glorified By Nutrition Bureau And Tasty Recipes Cabbage is on the list of ptentl- Juls. And the Bureau of Human Nutrition and Home Economics Is rlRht on iu toes with • new batch of sauce Ideas to (jlorlfy our old faithful friend, a head of cabbage. For a vegetable salad In which cabbage appears, you can use may- onnai.se, French dressing, sweet cream with horseradish «nd lemon juice, or sour cream. These are all fine, for example, t.ith a salad of chopped cabbafe, cucumbers cut into thin- slices, chopped red radishes, young Rreen onion tops, or slivers' of carrots. Here's an uncnokrd sour cream wlad HrrssL-f sjjgested for cab- a(je—or cucumbers or lettuce: Use ',< clip of sour cream, whipped; 1 tablespoon of s'l.eur; '/. teaspoon of salt; a little pepper: 1 lable- spoon lemon juice; 2 tabu-spoons vinegar. Mix the si'gar, salt and popper in a bowl. Arid the lemon juice and vinegar; then stir this mixture gradually into the whipped cream. A vinegar dre^inc a(< •& ze st to a sweel-sour cabb:n;e slaw made with shredded cabbage, a bit of grated onion and celery salt. Make the dressing with sugar, vinegar, salt, pepper and thick sweet or sour crenm. A peanut butler sauce is a ta^ty teammate for cooked cabbage or onions or cauliflower. To make about 1 C'up. use 1 tablespoon table fat, Vi cup of peanut butter, 2 teaspoons flo;:r, Vi teaspoon salt, pepper, 1 cup of milk. Melt fat over boiling water. Blend In peanut butter. Add flour and seasonings and stir until smooth. Stir in the cold milk slowly. Cook over boiling water until thickened, stirring constantly. Remember the rich flavor imparted to cabbage by a white sauce or a cheese sauce. For tire cheese sauce, use 4 tablespoons of fat. 4 tablespoons of flour, 2 cups of milk H teaspoon salt, % pound of cheese, shaved thin (2 cups). Melt the fat, blend In the flour. Add cold milk and salt. Heat and stir until thickened. Add the cheese. Stir until 1» melts. Try This Heft One-Dish Meal Topped With Watercress Biscuits Hot Coffee Replacing Summer Beverages Now Now that hot coffee Is again replacing icy summer beverages, It's time to brush up on the rules for making good coffee. ,; The first rule is to start with a really clean coffee pot. Those made of porcelain enamel are especially easy to keep sparkling because they have a shiny glass finish which re- itsta stains. Regular soap and water washings will keep enameled oof- fe« makers fresh and clean. Accumulated stains can be removed easily by soaking the coffee pot in water to which a little household bleach has been added. Equally Important i* accurate measurement of both coffee and water. The recommended proportions are two level measuring spoons of coffee to three-fourths of a standard measuring cup of water. If this result* In i brew that It a bit too •trong, reduce the amount of oof- Jee slightly. Consistent timing U Important, . Find the time that makes coffee to suit the family tastes and itick to It to get uniform results. Serve the coffee as soon as pos- ilbla after brewing. If It must be kept warm for any length of time, the non-porous glas.1 surface of the i porcelain enameled coffee maker ] will in no way affect Ihe flavor of the coffee. ELYTKEVn.LE (ARK.)' COURIER NEWS Portable Oven Thermometer Hits Baking Failures If cakes come out of (he oven pale and flabby, coarse In texlure or better, and If i <| 0 ia Bc t to sine It, I quit." Corwln ?aid: "Okay, 'you quit." The driimmcr said: "I quit." Corwm said: "Start »'alkti)B." The drummer slailcd u-alkiu» and he didn't stop walking mull lie walked)into the hearts of America withU famous recording of "Bcxeme Muclio." The drummer's name, of course, ivns Andy Russell. MEAL IN 1VSELF—This succulent com slew imkcs a wonderful one-dish iuneheoii. Looking for a hefty one-dish about 23 cups of milk and stir meal for hungry children? Com i until dough formes. Knead lightly stew Is one succulent answer. To half a dozen times on lightly give the stew an extra appeal, serve watercress bi5ciiit.s with n. Corn Slew f4 servings) Three tables|Mor.s butter, U cup thinly sliced onion, U cup finely diced green pepper,' 2 taolespooiib flour, 2 cups chicken hroih, one 3- ounce can chopped n:oi!t-d 'mushrooms, 'A teaspoo.i kitchen bouquet, 1 2.3 cups canned whole kernel corn or cooked fre-sli corn off the cob, 1 cup diced fresh t-jmato, lightly floured hoard. Roll out about Vi- inch thick and cut with Hi-inch culler. Hake in very hot oven 1425 degrees F.> until lightly browned and done, aljoitt 12 jmnuies. Holl/wood Continued from page 8 ',; teaspoon salt, '.» teaspoon pep- j "Hescine Mucho." per, fi, teaspoon chili powder. He c-lKtmed the right to prevent Melt butter in saucepan over moderate heat. Arid onion and green pepper. Let cook about 2 minutes stir In flour. Add chicken broth, contents of can of mushrooms and kitchen bouquet. Cook stirring constantly, until soup comes to a boil. Add corn, tomato cut in li-inch cubes, salt, pepper and chili powder. Cover and bring to boil. Let simmer over low heat for 15 minutes. Serve in Individual heated soup dishes, w'ith hot buttered watercress biscuits. Watercress Biscuits (Makes about 24 biscuits) To make the watercress biscuits, simply chop the leaves from a bunch of watercress very fine. Add this to 2 cups of biscuit mix. Add MOMOG6A//ZE0.' Haze! from singing the number In Hie snow. "it's impossible," said Corwin "Tradition or no tradition, law or no law, Miss Dawn is the star of this show an<| if she wants to sing ;Besen 1B Muclio'. or anything else.: its hers and no drummer is going to stop her." The spunky little drummer said: 'Mr. Corwin. I can sing that song just as well as .she can, or crtsp crisp crisp crisp crisp c-r sp crisp crisp crisp crisp orisp crisp crisp crisp CPI.-JD o-'sp cr =P crisp cr>——" crisp crir sp crisp crisp c op ori s , crisp sp cri, crisp sp cr crisp sp cr: crisp sports" r^.^,. orisp crisp crisp crisp crla'p'cr sp crisp orisr^ isp crisp orisp cris.- -r'— -•^, ., ; ^crisps crisp «ri» v ci-^p .-(.*• nap « r sp criap crisp crisp tVfc, crisp oriap crisp crisp crisp crisp or ap crisp crtsp crisp crisp crisp --l=n ,.,-(=„ ,,-i = » „,.(.„ „„(,,„ „£, '** )cn> TO MAKI •000 CO? FEE! WHEN TOM STAKT WITH for a meal that's a money-saver serve Mayrose frankfurl quails St LouiB Independent Packing Company •>»C«M O. H,«. burned around the edees, chance* are the oven temperatures Is to blame. If the oven has no thermostat, the difficulty probably lies In attempting to guess the proper temperatures. In ovens with Ihennas- tallc controls, it may be that the controls need checking and re-setting. In either ca.sc, a jwrcnble oven thermometer Ls an excellent guide to accurate baking temperatures. In using the oven without a control, a glance at the thermometer Indicates when the oven heat should be raised or lowered to keep a constant temperature. The thermometer Is also useful in testing the acuracy of the oven with thmnostutlc controls. Choose air oven thermometer that take.5 up a minimum of spnce and daren't interfere with lite arrangement of baking pans. One that Is especially handy U m*d< of sturdy black enameled metal with shiny chrome trim. It has a round, clock- like face printed with black, easy- to-read figures. Small and compact this thermometer Is designed to stand on, or hang from, tile oven racks. To use, hang or stand the thermometer on the oven rack on which the food Is to be baked. Turn tlie heat on high lo preheat the oven to the desired temperature, Then lower the heat to keep the temperature constant. It will be necessary to peek at the thermometer during Die baking period to bo certain that the heat Is correctly adjusted. However, a thermometer and a little careful attention will be a sure cure for baking failures caused by incorrect temperatures. PAGE THIRTEEN SUBSTITUTE FOR MEAT MACARONI-SPAGHETTI PURE EGQ NOODLES Emu Bite Meaw TMtt SLICED BACOI ** for » * yaw CHOICE MEATS FREE SAMPLES Mayrose Keady-To-Kal PICNIC HAMS ib. 48c Come in and get n free ttample" of May rose 1'icnic Hams from a representative of the Independent 1'kg. Co. iUayrose Cello Pack WIENERS Fresh, Delicious PORK LIVER Wilson's Certified CHUCK ROAST Top Quality BOILED HAM ,, Lb Ib 49< 39 C 49 C SUGAR •-- 10ibbag89c Winrergarden STRAWBERRIES-16 oz P kg29c Duke's MAYONNAISE P t. 33c Sour Pitted CHERRIES No. 2 can 25c All Good, in halves PEACHES---- No.21can22c Pride cream style ' CORN - - - - - 2 NO. 1 cans 25C Popular brands CIGARETTES----- C fn $1.89 The Pause That Refreshes COCA-COLA case 89c All popular flavors JELLO 3 Chewing gum special GUM Polled MEAT A man's lohacco PA Mar-Gold OLEO Ib. 23c California ORANGES Michigan CELERY Bartlett PEARS Tokay GRAPES Fancy CARROTS No. 1 Washed POTATOES Vine Ripened CANTALOUPE -* 5 £ 39< 10< 15< lOc .2ft, 47< - lOc Rush's Whole BEANS Pure LARD BEER 12 Citns r ,,19 5 Victor FLOUR.. 25 iiT ,,,53 Kolgcr's COFFEE Shredded COCONUT Crushed P'APPLE American SARDINES 2 19 lieaiify Sonp CAMAY f.aundrv soap P&G .... Liberty Cash Grocery's RECIPE OF THE WEEK Western Meat •<*» nraailcnili Ocli>k,r 1, 1949 . KraunJ h».j ( 2 ttblckpo**^ *i** «r Mix tSoroughl^ tli* beef, o*ti, 1 t_. inir, the pcppor and milk. Shap* m._ 8 ball). Roll in mixture of flour, p«p- riicn. find remaining !/ t t**»p. *«[t. Brown on all lictc* in ihortening. Add onion; cook jlowiy J m i n . Siir in mia- turft of brtrbccu« Muct »nd •*«(•*. Cover; »Iinmer 45 in in.; turn m»«t b.illi now and then. Add drainW corn; h«ivc thorongrilr. S*rv« Ke*. \]aVe» -1 s«rving», ^Venl, lamb or I««n pork aJ*« •*« ho used. **Corn liquid can rtplact p«« of tit* V. p .lt<r for added flavor. Ynn rr/r AW^I Per Milk . can!3c Beef ...... !b. 49c Kolkd Oars ... pkg. 17c \Vltolo Kernel Corn .... can 23<

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