Evening Star from Washington, District of Columbia on December 28, 1900 · Page 5
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Evening Star from Washington, District of Columbia · Page 5

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Friday, December 28, 1900
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FOR SALE -LOTS. FOlt SALE N. Ct'P ST. iltor M AND N. Y. AVE n.w.. Ci e hI. 5- feet flr . 'ly U.'"l: v11.3 de-iall for1P - 6-apartintw 110 : w% 11 1 I-Y 1 ne", ; see lwans: o.- I"t :I. q. 62-t L [I.w. Ilet. N tall. ani ist ; 'i3i(; ;'Arty wais; only $1.350. W. V. NA1- 121 nw 2'53T flit SA.Il tII :INE %PiE\1.,i; If QT. TWO tvtir ft-ni Other F or '.-nn, avo. car lines: N i!..; stiital' for fine lonie or apartieu t h< nw-: pri.e, $: per f,r. ;r $1.3S .5t. _de.-7-:3t - RE\. 11b 1111I \ PFIl)R >.- 7 131 14th-qt. FRlt S.\IE M ST. NEA\M N. 'Al'. SiP; Sl'ILNdit site for small flat: Lxl2o t-, allpy iarking; nw 11tle (-mpany's erile:te: iorete street; all inmprovements. 'rn.-. $1.3541. dtl.-:6 t H. It. Ploi-NTEN 4.t R t. n.w. FOR SALE-A7 A H.A(AIN-CORNEt WYOming aVe an' CelunmbPia ra01; A bie lIlatiOD JOHN SiHEFRMiN. no23-tf 6111 4th st BUSINESS PROPERTY. Tii DF;litAIHI.E TENAN'N. Th,- Sorl doir of The Evning Star Annex wrill b. r1-nie-1 I-, a desirabl. tenant. Size 54)X1-0 feet. st-:im hent, ewr light i, ndwmtor p-wer. Et. e1r serviee. AI-Iv at Tiw St:ar Oftice. o413-tf POTOMAC RIVER BOATS. E. S. It.\NItAI.i. f POTONIC RtIVlI:It LINE CO., OtiN... 1.1 W r %V111f. t l sth st. -S 11 . RRY RAND.\L, for 0-lwnial Bea.b. Curriiamnen. N,1m1 tii. I-%\er M:i.dbr. C.ntio s and tilher r.ver Ianiio,g. Sutm.,ys, ltsilays and Itirsdays at 7 a.m. Lwtutning n i tiday aiI Wednesday about 5:30 p.m. and ul FI.day aba lt 3 p.ui. 1 NiiD STATES MAIL i OUTE. WAStiNW'OON, 1). 4'.. TO t..Y.\0lINT, MD., atml iterm-diate landingo. Tie new seaur E iEt..E ANDALL, daily, except Sund.,.y. i:3 a.m. lIetiinag ab.ut 3 p.m. P-a-elger act-omma.datholns tlst-ciass. Freight received till the hur -i vail.ig. E. S R.kNDALL. Manager, 'phone 1765. GEO. 0. CAlIPINTEIt. Gene:al Ag.nt, Washingon, 'phinie loi. %-M. M. itEAtDON. Agent. Alexandria. 'phine GO. - se3-tf STEAMER WAKFFIE.10, FOlt P4)T4)MIA il\Elit LANIlNGS. Iaves Washingt-n. D11'. jTh st. Ferry Wharf), 3.nday. 7 in . for intertueL,ite landings to Colonial Beavh. Bushiwod. t,ck Pt., 4)Iton's, Nomini ('reek. Wednesday. 7 a.m., for intertm diate landing< to C,lnial iteach. ltushw-j. Itck Pint, Ot,n's, 14olini Cleek. Stne's. H.,wal and 0'brum's. Saturlay. 7 a.m.. f,r interimedoite landings to Colonial Itelcil. liushwood. Rock 1int. Colton's, Nomini Creek. jy11-14tf C. W. RIDLEY. General Manager. THE WEEMS STE.,MHOAT CO. PITO(At RIVER ROI'TE. WINTER SCIIEDV'IX. On and after Deceuber 2.5 ti. Str. POTOMAC will leave 7th mt. wharf every Thursday lit 4 p.m. for BaltimIre and River Landings. All river freight tmist ie piepall. Baltimore and Philadelph a freight solleited. Accommodati.ns for pais.1ngers strie:ly first-class. STEPHENSON & BItO., Agents. Telephone 745. de26-12if FOREIGN POSTAL SERVICE WASHINGTON. D). v.. PfOr 4OFrFiCE NOiCE. Should be read daily, as changes may occur at any tiie FOREIGN MAILS are forwarded to the ports of sailing daily, and the schedule of closings is arranged on the presumption of their uwinterrupted overland transit. .For tihe- week ending December 29, 19400. the last ionneeting closes will be made from this offlee as follows: riANSATI.ANTiC MAILS. FRIDAY.-jbi At -:15 P.M. for FRANCE, SWITZERLAND, ITALY. SPAIN. PORTUGAL, TURKEY. Ei;YPT, IIRITISH INDIA and LORENZf) MARQUEZ. per a.s. I a Normandie. from New Yoirk, via lavre. Mall for other parts of EUROPE must eic direid "Per a.s. La Normandie." (c) At 11:05 P.M. for EUROPE. per s.s. Campania. from New York. via Queenstown. 1c) At 11:05 P.M. for NETIERLANDS direct. per s.s. Amsterdarn, from New York. Mail must be directed "Per s.s. Amsterdam." ic) At ll:iP5 P.M. for ITALY, per a. Aller. from New York. via Naples. Mail must he directed "Per P.s. Aller." (e) At 11:05 '.M. for SCOTLAND, per 9.s. Aneboria, from New lork. Mail must be direvted '"Per s.s. Ancboria." PINTED MATTER. ETC.-This steamer takes printed matter. commercial papers and samples for GERMANY only. The same claos of mail matter for other parts of EUROPE will not be sent by this ship. unlea slpectally directed by her. MAILS FOR SOUTH AND CENTRAL AMERICA, WEST INDIES. ETC. FRIDAY-ic) At ]1:,15 P.M. for PORTO RICO, via san Juau. VENEZUELA and Cl'IACAO, per a.s. Caracas. from New York. Mall for SAVANILILA and CARTIIAI,ENA must be dir-et,-d "Per s.s. Caracas." tel At 11:05 P.M. f-r GRENADA and TRINIDAD. per s.e. Maraval. from New York. 4c0 At 11:05 P.M. for ST. TillNlA$. ST. Cto)IX, I.EEWARD and WINDWARD ISLANDS and I1.MERARA, tier s.s. Madiana frn New York. Mail for GItENADA and TRINIDAD must be direeted "Per s.s. Madiana.' 1ci At 11:05 P.M. for FuirtNE ISLAND. JAMAICA, SA\ANII.LA and CARTIIAGENA, per s.8 Altai, from New York. Mail for COSTA HICA must tw directed "Per s.s. Altai.' ie. At 11:05 P.M. for IIAITI. per s.a. Alis. from New York. ii At 11:115 iPM. for YUCAIAN. per P.s. Prima, frolm New York. via Progr.so. let At 11:05 P1.M fr MATANZAS. CAl14AIEN. NUEVITAS. 4;I%ARA and BARACOA per s.s 40linda. from New York. (Ordinary mali only, whiii must be dir-ttd "Per s.9. Oind.,' ii At 11:05 P.M. for PEINAMBfCO and SANTOS, per s.s. Grecian Princte, from New York. SINIPAY (December 30-tfP At 1'1:30 A.M. for N.%SSAI*. N.P.. per steamer from Miami, Fla. Mails for NEWFOU'NDLAND, by rail to North Sydne) and thence via steamer, close here daily, except Suiday. at 12:00 M., and on Sundays only at 11:30 A.M. 4d) ib Mails for MIQU'ELON. by rail to Boston and thence via steamer, close here daily at 3:15 P.M. id) CUBA MAILS close here via Port Tampa, Fla., Wednesdayi. Fridays and Sundays at 2:20 '.M. (f) Mails for MEXICO overland, 1ilesm speeially addressed for dispatch by steamers sailing from New York, close here daily at 10:30 A.M. and 14):00 P.M. (k) Mails for BELIZE. PUERTO CORTEZ and GUA'IEMAI.A, by rail to New Orleans and thence via steamer, close here daily at 10:00 P.M., the connecting closes for which being Mondays. Mails for COSTA RICA, by rail to New Orleans and thence via steamer. close here daily at 10:00 F.M., the cunnecting closes for which being Tuesdays. TRANSPACIFIC MAILS. Mails for AUSTRALIA tex-ept West Australia), NEW ZEALAND, HAWAII, FIJI and SAMOAN ISLANDS. via San Frantic,'v, close here daIly at 7:00 P.M. up to Deiember 214, inclusIve, for dispatch per s.. Siniima. (04 Mails for AI'STRtALIA (except West Australia, which gotes via Europie, amil New Zealandi, which goes via San Franeis"-o cliose here daily at 7:00 P.M. in toianuary 5, incliusive. for dispatch per a... Warrimn. t Mails for *CHINA. JAPAN, HAWAII and :PHII, IP1'NE ISI.A N iS. v ia Sli n Ira ncis.o, close here daily at 7:00 '.M P l u to .liinuary 3, inilusive, for dispatch per s.s. Peking. io, *Mails for i'ell N ti IINA are forwarded to New Yo.rk f.r'cnnection wsith Elirliean steamers. : P'illLIP'l'INE IllA N 1)5 inilliary maeil), dispatched io San I-ran ise' att all clo si's fur that ofice, to.~ onect withl goviernmuint transpo,rta, the sailings i-f whichl ar' irrt'gular. (but Registere-t mailis el.'' at 1:00 P.M., same day. Ic) Registered mails close at 8:00 P.M. same day' (di Rtigiatered mails cllse at 8:00 A.M. same day. qei Registered mall ise t10 ..peiu Saturday. (f) Registered maii lose t10 ..peiu b)Registered rnatlosea 2oIM.pviu sk)i Registered malls coea :0PM ieiu day. (ot egiterd milsclose at 1:00 P.M. previous de22 JOHN A. MERRITT. P'istmaster. OCEAN_TRAVEL NORTH GERMAN LLOYD FaSiT EXP'REsS SERVICE, CHERBOU RG, St)UTHAMPTON, IREMEN. E.W.d.Gr.Jan. 3, II0 am Tirave.....Feb. 12, 10) am TEra'e...... Jan, 15, noon Labn.....Feb. 26. 10 am 1ahn....,..Jan. 29, 10 am K.W.d.Gr.Mar. 5, 10 am OELRtI'HM & CO., NO. 5 BItOADWAY, N. Y. Apply to E. F. DROOP, tt25 Pa. ave., te7-ly________ Agent for Washington. American Line. FAST EXPitESS SERtViCE. NEW Y 'JRK-SOUTH'AMP~TON- LONDON. CALLING WiESTBOU;ND AT CHIERBtOURG. Sailing Wednesdays at 10 A.M. New York... ..an. 2 *Friesland. ...Jan. 28 Kgenaington... Jan. * Vtaderian.....Jan. 30 * Noordsand....Jan. 16 New York..eb. 6 *SAILING AT NOON. Red Star Line. NEW YORtK--ANTWERP'-PARl3. Evezy Wednesday at 12 noon. Westernlanid... Jan. 2 Noordand.....Jan. 16i KensIngton....,Jan. 9 Friesiand..Jan. 23 L.NTER.' ATION AL NAY IGATiON COMP'ANY, Piera 14A 15. N. R. Office 73 Bioadway. New Kork. PhiladelphIa uthlee, ',0J-3017 Walnt at, WASIHiNwTON OFFICE. 1306 F at. n.y., or 0. W. MOSS. Agent, 1411 G3 st. n.y.; (G. COLTON & CO. Agent, 913 Pas. awe. n.w. de12 FRENCH LINE. COMPAGNIE GENERALE TRANSATLANTIQUD, DIRECT LINE To HIAVRE-PARLIS (France.. Sailing ever Thursday at 10 a.m. Prona Pier No. 4.North River. foot Morton St. IGascogne..Jan. 8.L'Aquitaine ....,..Jan. 24 3Brtagne .....Jan. 10 La G ascogne.,....Jan. 81 LaChampagne..,.Janl. 1? Ia Bretagne....Feb. I General Agency. it2 Broadway. New York. 0. W. MOSS. 1411 0 ST. N.W. aul-156t-14 MEDICAL , Eclectic (painless) Treatment. Chief physieIan to the Eclectic H., R. Co,2 years' practice, oldet speelialiat in Washington, gnarantees a cure without pain, cutting or mercury. e.cial cases of every character treated success. fully. ConsnltatIon free. Hours, 9 to 5 and 7 to 1 evenings. 623 13th at. n.w. de10-26t*-10 Dr. Reed, Specialist, Treats muccesflully 4.atarrh, Kidney and Stomach Troubles. etc. CURE1,S special diseasef' with out the use of mercury, etc. Odice hours, 10) tc 3, 8 to 6; Sunday, 10 to 12. CONSULTATIOSl IrREE. 500 12TH ST. N.W. mhl3-8,tf Dr. Leatherman, ' gert specialist in the cure of all speeial die of man and woene. Onmaultation tree. 9. toI 12, 2 to 5: Tuea., Thus. an4 Sat T e 1?m m.w. Canna nmUamaa. EDUCATIONAL Geo. Lawrence l Le"on.tio El,wutininr. Pian.), Violin, Man.. Guitar. Pupils' conceria. jiat, drama. TRIAL TERM, $10. Open ev'gs. ni 26-30t* rtVoice, Violin, Piano. String Instruments. MT V EINON PLACE MUSIC STUDIO. 807 K ST. de4- 1'.'t". 4 O k f. jSchool for Grls and Young IAdies. 1759 Madison st., near Dupont Circle. de24-8t* Miss V. HETH,. A.M. Circulars. TANNER'S COLLEGE, c(ORNER OTH AND F. The best HOLIDAY GIFT is a course in Shorthand and Bisi..ess. It will always be valnable. We are In session during the Holidays. de2l-6tf WIM10IAUGHSIS CLASSES, 1420 N. Y. AVE.Frnch convers,ation on Bernhardt's play, L'AigI"n. "..gan n edneoday, Dec. 5. Mrs. E. C. MONTIS, __pt.de4-tl 1438 N STREET N.W. THE MISSES KERR'S HO11E SCHOOL. del-20 -. THE WASHRT SCHOL FOR BOYS, Wisc,nsiin ave. near cleveland Park. Receives day and Imoardlaig pupils of any age. Nine teachers. New builldiig. refectory, library. laboratory. Gymnasium, athletiv lid, g,lf links. Advisory bo-rd: Justice lireuNer. Seoy. Gage. Mr. C. C. ltiver, Col. Wright and tither prinminent Washington men. L. L. HtiPER. A.M.. Head 'Master. no20-10tf Wood's Commercial College (IiCORPtit.A I I -TED-SIXTEE\TH YEAR), 311 EAST CAPITOL STREET. Why is it the best patronized? Because it IIaS the beat teachers. Because the tuition is reasonable. ltecause modern methods are used. Becaus. positions are secured. Day and evening sessions. 'Phone 1738. or write, or better still, call. no16-tf Washington Heights School, 18S50 Wyoming ave., cor. 19th st. n.w. Certiticate admits to college. Principal. Miss FRANCES MARTIN. gv19-tf Ass't Prin., Miss C. PETTIGREW. French and English School for Girls. Suburb of Washington. Fien'i the language of the house. Mile. L. M. lIouligny. Prin.. Chevy Chase P. 0. Md. tuy22-312t,5 Holy Cross Academy, 1312 Mass. av. Academic and commnierial. Kindergarten for boys and girls opens Septembiner 17. au29-tf.4 The Olney School, 1216 18th St. and Connecticut avenue. Primary, Academic and Collegiate Departments. Miss Virginia Masin Dorsey, se3-tf alias Laura Lee Dorsey, Principals. Friends' Select School FOR BOYS AND GIRLS OF ALL AGES. HAS PREPAIRED STI,FNTS FOR 24 DIFFERENT CI.LEGES AND TECIiNICAL SCIlOOTS. CERTIFICATE .RVLG TO VASSAR, smiTH. WF.LLFSI.EY. DAItTmIol'TH AND SWARTIIMORE. LARGE GYMNASi'M AND PLAYGROVND. CIEMICAL AND PIIYSICAL LABORA TOitY. lah chii's cu.irse of Stidy is planned with reference In his needs and great attenltin is given to thor ughlness in essentials. MR. AND MICS. THOMAS W. S'8DWE.L. ocl-tf 1811 1 St. n.w. WASHINGTON DRAMATIC C41NSERVATORY. 1114 F ST. Culture for conversation and reading. Literary analysis. Dramati art. Fencing and physical culture. Study of Shakespcare: clubs coached; plays presented; elass and privat instrutction. Evening and lay classt-s. Send for prospeclue. M. AURELIA BARRINGTON, Directress. no3-52t* The Bliss ERectrica School, Offers both day and night coirseg In Eletrivity, complete in one year ElectricAl Iheory and ipratie; aIso Mehanlal Drawing. Stud.nts are fitted to take charge of electri- lighting and itwer plants. Send for catilogi.-. L4)UIS ). BLI%S:, Prinvilpal, 414 12th st. n.w. nol-52t.8 McDona0d=Elis Home and Day School FOlt GILTt.; AND YOI I ADIES. Eighteenth year opens oh-tober 1. 19100. CAlrner .\a-a--husetts avenue attid 17th street. omniplete and thorough courses of study in all depart am-ts. DR. E. R. LEWIS, Principal, sels-tf 13105 17TII STRFEIT. Mount Vernon Seminary, CORNER M AND ELEVENTH STREIKI'S N.W. Boarding and Day School FOIL YOUNG LADIIS AND LI'ITLE GIRIS. PIUIMARY, PREPARATORY AND COLLEGIATE DEP1ARTENIFTS.'l1IROIGH TILAINING IN ALL BRANCHES IN A(WOAtDAN'E WITH BEST MODl'tIN ME'H ODS SPA CI(OUS BUILDINGS RECENTLY ERECTED IPECIALLY FOR S('IIOOL PR11POSES. AMPLE PILAYGROI'NDS AND TENNIS COURT. TWENTY-SIXTH1 YEAlt OPENS 0'1'0BEit SE''ND FUR FURTHER INFORMATION APPLY TO Mrs. Elizabeth J. Somers, PRINCIPAL. Mrs. Adelia Cates Hensley, ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL. se26-28tI French, German, Spanish, etc. Method awarded two gold and two silver medals at the P'aria Exposition of 1900. B3ER LITZ ^bilI I" ""o*"'si ac"''ed in SCHOOL. P23 At. GONARlD, Principal, FEBl. 11. SIkIAL FRENCH COURSES; 36 LESsons; 12 weeks: easy. attractive method. Classes nov. all grades. Cars pass5 school gate. MLLE. V. PRUDI\II(ME, '7 I at. n.w. de19-4tt SCHOOL OF PIASSAGE. GOSTA FLORMAN, no2t-52t* 924 19th st. C A I It 0 KINDElIIGAIITEN AND PRIlM A RY School. formerly at the Cairo. FR ANCES NICOLL, SAlRA ALLINGTI IN. Principals. 14:12 N at. n.w. Coach call,, for childrmt se4-104t* SCHIOOL (OF French Language. PROF. C. G. RIV.OT OF PARtIS, de4-2(t* 1223 13th st.a n.. MRS. A. K. BENSON. Voice buildling, tone placing and the art of singing. Circular. Tuesday atd FrIday. Sanders & Stayman's. 1327 F at Rlesidence, 1242 Princeton st. de6-26t* MANDOL.IN. GUITAR AND B1ANJIO CORRECTLY TAI'GHT BY MISS I;ERTRUDE ELISE BUCKINGHlAM. STU'DIIO. 1522 (fl'1 ST. N.W. MT. PLEASANT MONDAYS AND THIUlTSDAYS.de3-tf W. F. DALES, l'H.D., 322 C ST. N.W., CLASSical teacher. Twelve years' successful expierienie in preparing pupilils for coillege. Excellent references Sp,ecialties, Greek. Latin and English. de3-26t*-4 Education for Real Life For Sons and Daughters, at SPENCERIAN BUSINESS COLLEGE, Academy of Music huilding. 9th and D n.w. Beautiful, spacIous halls. Entrance,.4A03 9th St. The thirty-sixth sc-holastic year. Day and night Sessions. The leading business men of Washington were educated in this institution,, and send their sons ord daughters and candidates for employment hears Raplid, legible, beautiful Writing. SpellIng, thorough English anid Correspondenc.e. Shorthand and Touch Typewriting. RlapId Calculations. Bookkeeping and Business Practice. Science of Wealth. Commercial Geography. Civics. Laws of Business. Ethics. Moral and Social Culture. Art of Expressio.n (Delsarte method). Vocal and Physical Culture. Nigh9t clases: Monday, Wednesday and Friday, For new catalogue or further information call at omlie or address Mrs. SARA A. SPENCER, Principal and Proprietor. ~EIERAPHY, I4HORITHAND. TYPEWRITING ~~lTHE DRIILLERY, 504 nith. nol0-s,tu.th,8 Columbia Conservatory OF MUSIC, 802 K ST. 14.W. PIANO. VIOLIN. V010D, MANDOLIN, GUlTAR. hc. nol-50t* EDWIN HART. PRINCIPAL. WASH. RIDING SCHOOL, 1105 11TH ST. N.W.Lessons given In riding a specialty. Saddle horses foi hire Also light hiring. Special attention paid to boarding. de18-18t* MISlS BALCH'S CIVIL. SERVICE INSTITUTE AND BUSINESS COLLEGE, 1340 Q St. n.w. Higher mathematics, stenography typewriting. ap3-4tf WP'. ROSE'S INDUSTRlIAL SCHOOL. Dressmaking, underwear and children's suits. A new department has been opened, in which ladies and young girls will be taught cutting, fitting and all kInds of sewing. For particulars apply to the SCHOOL. 2023 G st. n.w. - se12-tf riiss Katie V. Wilso'n '.--.----. 5a.... LEGAI. NOTICES. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE DISTRIOT of Columbia, holding a special term for (hans' Court business.-In re estate of William Anderson, deceased; No. 9808, Administration Docket 27.Application having been made to the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, holding or special term for Orphans' Court business, for probate of the last will and testament, and for letters testamentary on said estate by James O'R. Kuhn, it is ordered, this 20th day of December, 1900, that notice is hereby given to the unknown heirs and next of kin of said William Anderpon, and to all others concerned, to appear in said court on Monday, the 21st day of January,. A. 1). 1901, at 1 o'clock p.m.. fb show cause why such appHcation should not be granted. This notice shaH be published in the Washington Law Reporter and The Evening Star once in each of three successive weeks before the return day therein meirtioned-the first publication to be not less than thirty days before said return day. By the court: CHAS. C. COLE, Justice. Attest: LOUIS A. DENT. Register of Wills. GORDON & GOILDON, Attorneys for Applicant. de2l-law3t ESTATE OF THOMAS F. MAGUIRE. DEceased. No. 9292, docket 26.-The Washington ILan aqd Trust Co., administrator, has, with the approval of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, holding a special term for Orphans' Court business. appointed Friday, January 4, 1901. at 1 o'clock p.m., as the time, and said court oom as the place, for passing of claims and making payment and distribution under the court's direction and control; when and where all creditors ind persons entitled to distributive shares or lega!ies, or a residue, are notified to attend in person or by agent or attorney duly authorized, with their laims against the estate properly vouched: Prorided, this order be published once in each of thiee successive weeks before said day In the l ashington Law Reporter and The Evening Star. Signed lecember 13. 1900. Approved: CHAS. C. COLE, Justice. LOUIS A. DENT, Register of Wills. JOHN B. IARNEit, Attorney. de14-f,3t ESTATE OF WILLIAM WALL, DECEASED. No. 9113, docket 26.-Albert F. Fox, surviving xecutor. has, with the approval of the Supreme 3ourt of the District of Columbia. holding a speAial term for Orphans' Court business, appointed Friday, January 4, 1901. at 1 o'clock p.m., as the time, and said court room as the place, for passing f claims and making payment and distribution inder the court's direction and control; when and where all creditors and persons entitled to distributlve shares or le-acies, or a residue, are notiled to attend in peison or by agent or attorney luly authorized, with their claims against the esate properly vouched: Provided, this order be uilshed once in each of three successive weeks )efore said day in the Washington Law Reporter und The Evening Star. Signed December 13. 11IK. kLBERT F. FOX. Surviving Executor. Approved: AHAS. C. COLE, Justice. E. H. THOMAS, Attorney. LOUIS A. DENT, Register of Wills. del4-f,3t OFFICIAL NOTICES. STATE OF AldKANSAS, EXFAtTIVE OFFICE.DanI. W. Jones, Governor; Arthur Neill. Private iecretary-Little Itock. Ark., Dec. 24, 1900.-lb,n. Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.: Dear Sir: I have the honsor to, state that boy mistake the anme of W. MJ. (;oodwin was certified to you as ne of the Presidntial Electors for this state, whereas the name of W. S. Goodwin should have been certified to yon instead. I inclose four copies )f the corrected certiticate, in lieu of the ones ilready sent. Very respectfully, DANL. W. IONES, Goveruor. It STATE OF WEST VrTW;NIA, TO WIT: I, eorge W. Atkinson. govcrn,r of the said state, mrsuant to the act of the legislature thereof, in aneh case made and pr.vided, do hereby certify hat It. B. McMechen of the cunty of Marshall eceived 119.798 vtes. .J. It. Iwls of the county if Kanawha received 119.810 votes. 0. W. 0. lardman of ihe- county of Tyler received 119,b03 tes. N. 4;. Kelmn of the county if Randolph re-ev 119.a29 votes, Charles t. eury of the ounly of Fayotte reveive,l 119.',21 votes, Taylor 1. M,Clure of the county if Wayne received 119,417 votes, and were thly alointed by this state. it an election held therein on the sixth day of (ovem,er, Us). electors of l'resillent and Vice 'resident of the 'nied State%. G iven under my )and niol the great se:il of th s:id state of West 'irginia this 21;lh day of December, 11900. (Seal.) ;. W. ATKINS.ON. Ily 1e Governor: WM. M. 0. )AWSPN. Set-etary of State. it (OFFICE (iF Ti'F ASSETSSIR, 1iSTRICT OF Coluiitnia, Washingtonl, Dec. 2(o, 1900.- -Notice is hereby given that in accordance wilth the acts of 13ongress approvei Jun. 23. 1873: June 10, 1879; June 17. 1890; August 11, 1894; July 8. 1898, and June 2, 194o0, water inalns have been laid (n the following streets aid roads, and that a water main tax has been levied upon all lots or land abutting ulpn said respective streets and roads, as follon s: A-alnst the following l.ts and parcels uf land on :Wd street northeast, between L and M streets, city of Washington, D. C.: Sq. 748, p'rt of lot 1, Margaret andl B. W. Kennelly, owners. $47.5, being the south 38 feet front on 3d stroet northeast, by the full depth thereof; sq. 748, ub. 72, Charles Walter, owner, $21.54). Against tile following lots and parcels of land on Philadelp'hia street, between 8th street and Brightwood avenue l7th street. Petworib, plat 14. county of WashIngton, 1). C.: Block 26, sub. 17, Horare S. Cilmmings, W. Ii. Saunders and 0. W. F. Swaitz-Il, triust, iwners, $81.25; block 26. j,art of sub. '21, Joseph E. Wasbington, owner, $23.75, being t.e west 1) feet front on Phila<elphia street oy file full dep>th of saidi sublot 21; block 26. sub. '2, Joseph E. Waxingtou, owner, $42.50; block 26. sub. 23, Horace S. (uminings, W. H. Saunl:-ri anl G. W. F. Swartzell, trust, owners, $18.75; block 26, suo. 23, llorace S. Cunimiigs, W. II. Saunders and G. W. F. Swartzell, trust, owners, 555; block 27, stb. 24. Theodore D. Trapier. own- 1 Dr, $60.08; block 27, sub. 24, Theodore D. Trapier, 3wner. $1.65; block 27, sub. 25, Edwin W. Davis and Emma (). Toepper, owners, $60.78; block 27, sub. 26, Horace S. Cummings, W. H. Saunders and 0. W. F. Swartzell, trust, owners, $56.25; bloc'k 27, sub. 27. Horace S. Cummings, W. H. Saunders and (. W. F. Swnrtzell, trust, owners, $5.25; block 27, sub. 28. William H. Terrell, 3wner, $43.75. Against the following lots and parcels of latd oti Sheridan street, between Brown street and Piney Branch road, S. P. Brown's subdivision, plat 9. county of Washington, D. I'.: Part of lot 20, Elizabeth 0. Dole, owner. $62.50. beginning at the southwest corner of said lot 20. thence east wardly with Sheridan street 102 feet to Btrown street, thence northwardly 50 feet. thence westwardly 102 feet. thence sourhwardly 50 feet to beginning; part of lot 20. Elizabeth 0. Dole, owner, $2.S0, beginning at the southwest corner of said lot 20, thence eastwardly with Sheridan street 102 feet to Brown street, thence northwardly 50 feet, thence westwardly 102 feet. thence southwardly 5u feet to beginning. Against the following lots and parcels of land on Prviience street between 13th and 15th streets, addition to Brookland and MeCeney's subdivision plat 18. and Brookiand plat 19, county of Washington. Di. C.: Block -29, lot 1, Mary E. C4oon, owner, $602.50; block 29, lot 2, iPatrick Burke, owner. $6.5o; block 29, lot 3 Catherine L. Sheehan, wner, $62.50: block 29. jot 4, Albert B. -O'Meara, rswner, $62.50; block 29, lot 5, John C. White. iwner, $62.50; block 29, lot 6. Jo,hn A. Mlassie, awnter, $62.50; block 29. lot 7, Blernard A. Clark. ,wner, $62.50; block 29. lot 8, Bernard A. Clark, owner, $62.50; b,lock 29. lot 9. Bernard A. C'lark, wner, $62.50; blo.ck 29. lot 144. lleritard A. ('lark. awner. $62.50; bilock 29. lot 11. Enntua (. Mannittg, owner, 5612.5'0: block 29, lot 12. Enima G. Manning, owner. $62.50; block 30. lot 13, ETa M. Pitts, owner, $t..50; bl.jck 30, lot 14. Mary H. Wickes, owner, $62.5,0; block 30. lot 15, Kate 0. Diollowvay, owner, $612.50: lock 30, lot 16, Grace bee Parker, owtner, $62.50: b.lo'k 30, lot 17. Jluliet D)onttelly, owner, $62.50; block 30, lot l8 Carrie Elarrison, ownier, $62.S>.; block 30. lot 19, Everard Bierer, fr., owner, $62.50; block 30. lot 20. IDverard Bierer, jr., owner, $62.50; block 30, lot 21, Everard Btierer, Jr., owner, $612.50; block 30, lot 22, Everard Blerer, jr., owner. $02.50; block S0, lot 23, Cutroline Mytinger, owner, $62.50; block 30, lot 24. Caroline Mytinger, owner, $62.50; block 38, part, Esllen S. Mutssey, owner, $62.50. Leighton and P'airo (trustees) sub., beginning at the southwest corner of said block and westwardly line of said block, northetly 150 feet, thence easterly 50 feet, thence southerly 150 feet, thence westerly 50 feet to be'ginn.ing; block 86, part, Edwin C. Ford, owner, $62.50, Leighton and Pairo (trustees) sub., beginning at a point in the southerly line of said block, So feet west of southeasterly corner of said block, thence westerly with said southerly line So feet, thence northerly 150 feet, thence easterly 50 feet. thence so.utherly 150 feet to beginning; block 36t, pasrt. Ernest B. Swingle, owner, $62.50. Leighton and l'ailm (tustees) sttb., beginning at a point in the southerly line of said block 100 feet westerly of son;theast corner of said block, thence westerly 50 feet. thence northerly 150 feet, thence easterly 50. feet, th-nee southerly 150 feet to begning; block 36. part. Josiah M. Swingle, owner, $52.31, Leighton and Pairo (trustees) sub., beginning at a I ,int itn southerly line of said block 50' feet easterly of southwest corner, thence northerly 150 feet. easterly 41.85 feet, southerly 150 feet. thence westerly 41.85 feet to beginning; block 36. part. IIerman Theodore Holm, nter, $62.50, Leighton and Puiro (trustees) sub., begintiipg at sotheast corner of said block, thence westerly 50 feet, thence tiorthealy at right angles to south line 1540 feet, thetnce easterly 50 feet. thence southerly 150 feet to beginintg; block 37, part of lot 3. Betty W. Jamtieson, owner, $62.50. Leighton and Pairo (trusteces sub., beginnIng at the northwest corner, thence easterly 50 feet, thence southerly 100 feet. thence uwesterly 50 feet, thence northerly 100 feet to beginning; block 37. part of lot 3, Katherine A. Walsh, owreer, $60. Leighton and Pairo, (trustees) sub., beginning at a point in the north line of said lot So feet easterly of northwes4t corner, thenee easterly with said north line 48 feet, thence southerly 100 feet, thence westerly 48 feet, thence northerly 100 feet to beginnitig, containing 4.800 sq. feet; block 37, part of lot 3, Martha A. Richards, owner, $00, Leighton and P'airo (trnstees) sub., beginning at a point on the north line of said lot 98 feet easterly of the northwest corner, thence easterly 48 feet, thence southerly 100 feet, thence westerl 48 feet, thence northerly 100 feet to beginn.ing; block 37, part of lot 3, Hiram J. Penrod, owner, $5, Ieighton and Pairo (trustees) sub., beginning at a pint 92 feet west of the northeast corner of said lt 8, thence west 4 feet, thence south 100 feet, thence east 4 feet, thence north 100 feet to beginkg; block 87, part of lot 3, Amnanda Penrod, owner, $115, Leighton and Pairo (trustees) sub., beginning for the samne at a point in the south line of Providence street 150 feet east of the northwest corner of said lot 8, thence running eastwardly with the said south line of Providence street to the northeast corner of said lot 8, thence southwardly to the southeast corner of said lot 3, thence westerly along the south line of said lot 3 to a point 150 feet east of the West line of said lot, thence north 100 feet to the place of beginning; block 44, lot 4, Brookland addition, Firman R. Horner, owner, $59.06: block 44, lot 5, Brookland addition, Viriai Dlox, owner. $62.50; block 44, lot 0, Brookaddition, Margaret M. Pennybacker, owner, 875; block 44, lot 0, Brookland addition, Margaret M. Pennybacker, owner, $48.75; block 52. alL, Brookland addition, Theodore Holm, owner, 81.50; part of lot 1, McCeney's sub. Th1eodore flolm, owner, $222.50. beginning at tile southwest corner of said lot, thenee easterly 84 feet, thencee northerly 135 feat, thence easterly 54 feet, thence southerly 135 feet, thence easterly 94 feet. thence not~ry 270 feet, thence westerly 232 feet, then~ southerly 270 feet to beginning; part of lot 1, McCeney's sub., ,Toseph Krause. owner, $67.50beginning 84 feet east of the southwest corner o lot 1. thence easterly with.eaid south line of said lot No. 1, 54 feet, thence northerly 185 feet, tmanee westerly 54 fest. thens 'southerly 185 feet te i&tainm iehnt OFFICIAL OTICES. STATE OF NEW YOR , BY THEODORE Roosevelt, Governor.-1, 1HEODORE ROOSEVELT, governor of the state of New York, do bereby certify that .11he statement containing the canvass and certificate of ascertainment by the botrd of state canvassers of the state of New York as to electors .f Pres t and Vice President hereto annexed,- and cerved by the secretary of state of said stRle, under his seal of office, contains a true and correct list setting forth the names of electors of Preideat and Vice President, elected in the said Cate, at -the general election held in said state on the T%eeday after the first Monday In Novembdr (Novenber sixth). In the year nineteen hundred, parsant to the Oonstitutimn and laws of the United States and of the state of New York. to wit: Edward H. Butler Francis B. Mitchell 8mbel j. Underhill, Samuel Rowland, Michael Dady, -marles H. Russell. John Kissel, Henry Facer Joseph Simonson, William E. Billings, Herna' . Katz. Frank TiIford, Samuel S. Koenig, Arthtir P. Sturges, James Yereance, Emanuel W. Bl6bmingdale, William Sherer, Frank V. Millard, Olrence Lexow, John N. Cordits, Peter McCarthy, Samuel L. Munson, William S. C. Wiley. likwal Newton, William T. O'Neil. David M. Anderson, Robert MacKinnon, William G. Phelps, Ransum B, True, Robert Bushby, Franklin D. Sherwood, Charles F. Prentice, George Eastman, Christian Klinck, George Urban, Jr., Herbert C. Rich. And further that the statement of canvass and certificate of ascertainment, eertified by the secretary of state of said state, as aforesaid, correctly sets forth the canvass or ascertainment under the laws of said state of New York, of the number of votes given or cast for each rson for whose election any and all votes have ben given or cast at said election as aforesaid. In testimony whereof the great seal of the state is hereimto affixed. Witness my hand at the city of Albany, the fifteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred. THEODORE ROOSEVFLT. JOHN T. McDONOUGH, Secretary of State. State of New York, se.: Statement of the whole number of votes cast for all the candidates for the office of elector of President and Vice President at a general election held in said state November 6, 1900. The whole number of votes given for the office of elector of President and Vice President was fifty-five million eight hundred and two thousand three hundred and sixty-nine. of which Edward H. Butler, received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and ninety-two. Francis B. Mitchell received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and fifty-three. Samuel J. Underhill received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and forty-two, Samuel Rowland received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and forty-one, Michael J. Dady received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and seventeen, Charles H. Russell received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and twentyone, John Kissel received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and twenty-three. Henry C. Fischer received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and thirty-four, Joseph Simonotam received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and twenty-three, William E. Billings received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and twenty-one, Herman J. Katz received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and twenty-one, Frank Tilford received eight hundred and twentyone thousand nine hundred and twenty-four, Samnel S. Koenig received eight hundred and twentyone thousand nine hundred and fourteen, Arthur P. Sturges received eight hundred and twentyone thousand nine hundred and nineteen, James Yereance reeelved eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and eleven. Emanuel W. Bloomingdale received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and ten, William Sherer received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and six, Frank V. Millard received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and seven. Clarence Lexow received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and ten, John N. Cordts received eight hundred and twenty-me thousand nine hundred and thirtyfive, Peter 'MeCarthy received eight hundred and twenty-two thousand and thirteen, Samuel . Munson received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and one, William S. C. Wiley receivetl eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and fourteen. Rtoval N-wton received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand niir hundred and fourteen, William T. IWNeil received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four. David M. Anderson received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and fifteen, Robert MacKinnon received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand eight hundred and ninety-three, Wdlim G. Phelps received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, Ransom B. True received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and two, Robert Bubby received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, Franklin D. Sherwood received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred and one, Charles F. Prentiee received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand eight hundred and ninetyeight, George Eastman received eight hundred and twenty-one thousand nine hundred, Christian Klinck recolved eight hundred and twenty-one thousand eight hundred and ninety-six. George Urban, Jr.. received eight hundred and twenty-one thouand eight hundred and ninety-four, Herbert C. Rich reveived eight hundred and twenty-one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six, Frederick Cook received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and eighty-six, Robert C. Titus received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand four hundred and sixty-two, Israel J. Merritt received six hunded and seventy-eight thousand four hundred and ten. Edwin Kempton received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand four hundred and twenty-five, F&tward Kaufmann received six hundred anti seventy-eight thousand three himdred and ninety-nine. Henry George, Jr., received six hundred anti seventy-eight thousand four hundred and seve, William J. Seaton received six hundred aid seventy-elght thousand three hundred and ninety, Rud& - arles Bacher received six hund-ed and seve-ry-eight thousand three hundred and eighty-one, John E. Walsh received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and eighty-six. Samuel Kahn received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and eightyfive, Michael If. Whalen received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and seventyeight, Richard Fitzpatric-k received six hundred 1 and seventy-eigit thousand three hundred and seventy-eight, Michael F. Lyons received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and eighty-three, Henry Ha-liemeister received six bundred atid seventy-eight thousand three hundred and seventy-four, -John J. Harrington received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred antd eighty-five. Charles Frederick Neething receOved six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and seventy-seven, John McQuade received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and eighty, John Brishen Walker received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and seventy-nine, Edward Stocker received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and sixty-eight, John C. Hoornbeek recelied six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and fifty-two, Thomas H. Campion re-eivi six hundred and seveni-4ght thouand two hundred and eighty-one. William H. Keeier received six hundrmo and aeventy-e-ight thotadd three hundred and eiehty-three, Robert Wempie received six hutndred and seventy-eight thousand three hiund-red enl sixty-four. Charles Oscar Merireedy received six httndred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and sixty-four, Htenry Et. Barnard received six hundred 'and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and sixty-nine, Lawrence Clancy received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and fifty-two, Abram B. Weaver received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and sixty-nine, Thomas Keery received six hundred atnd seventy-eight thouisand three hundred and sixty-six, George Wells Saliahu ry received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and sixty-two. James M. Milne received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundired aitd sixty, liosee Ht. Rockwell received six hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and fifty-eight, James J. Mahoney received six hundred and seventy-sight thousand three hundred and sixty, James E. Oonley received ix hundred and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and sixty, William Simon received six hundird and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and sixty-nine, John McClure WViley received six huntired and seventy-eight thousand three hundred and fifty-two, Daniel F. Toomey reeived six hundred and seveny-eight thousand three hundred and forty-five, Franels E. Baldwin received twentytwo thousand and forty-three, William W. Smith received twenty-two thousand and seventy-seven Henry M. Randall received twenty-two thusand and sixty-seven. Isaac K. Funk received twentytwo thousand and sixty-aix, Benjamin Reynolds received twenty-two thousand and seveaty-one, Robert T. Stokes received twenty-two thousand sad sixty-seven, Edward A. Swesey, fr. received twenty-two thousand and sixty-four, 1Nilliam E. Brown received twenty-two thousand and seventyone, Rtobert Scott received twenty-two thousand and sixty-four, Charles W. McLellan received twenty-two thousand and sixty-seven, Timothy N. Holden received twenty-two thousand and sixtyfour, George Gethbin received twenty-two thousand and sixty-eight, Emory Cummings received twenty-two thousand and seventy, John McKee received twenty-two thousand and seventy two, Oharl.%E. Latimer received twenty-two thousand and se-venty-one. Jeremiah T. Brooks received twenty-two thousand and seventy-five, Albert T. Hull received twenty-two thousand and sixty-tine, Clarence M. Lyon reeived twventy-two thousand and seventyone, James C. Rider received twenty-two thousand and seventy, Mitchell Dowtiing received twentytwo thousand and seventy-one,,Nathsniel B. Powers received twenty-iwo, t,housgqd and seventy-five, Levi Dedrick received twenty-two thousand and seventy-six. Spencer Billitigton redeved twentytwo thousand and -sevent3'-four William HI. Place received twenty-two thi~ ad itand seventy. Jonathan E. Hong received twent' .two thousand and seventy-five, Frederick B. a vendorf received twenty-two thousand andi sevAity-four, William C. Gray received twenty-two thoqmand and seventythree. Edward H. Millerreelgdtwenty-two thousand and sixty-nine, A ury received twentytwo thousand and sixt -Eve, ~lhn W. Barrus reeeived twenty-two thoud ad sixty-two, Casper 0. Decker reeived twenrZ o thousand and sixtyseven, William E. BOb egeived twenty-two thousand and sixty-six,? Iejaiin C. Montgomery received twenty-two ththaa 'nd sixty-eight, Edwin Puxey received 'w~ytt thousand and sixty-aix, Joseph H. Shi r eved tirenty-two thousand and sixty-four, ~JhUNcholson received twenty-two thousand -am Uxt-sevenm, Charles H. Matchett received tweleh thosmnd eight hundred and sixty-nie, Carl - received twelve thousand sight bundrel a. -sevsn, Julius Halpera received twelve thousand sight hundred and fiftyseven, Valentine 8. W.,i qsved twelve thousand sight hundred fftysi, teter E. Bum'rowes received twelve p4e igh hundred and fifty-four, Arthur .K. Maynard reeved twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty- e, Alfred R. Pettitt received twelve thouanda igt hundred and fifty-five, Thomas Penderguat vd twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty , Frans W. Gasteiger received twelve thousand ei t hundred and fifty-five, William WolBinik ved twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, Henry 0. Vitallus received twelve thousanda eight hundred and fifty-four, Henry, 0. IJackson received twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, James W, Furneide received, twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty-three, Anthony J. Oesebger~ received twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, Henry Lua received twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty-two, Herman Quade received twelve thousand eight hundred and fift-three, Hans Hadrich recalved twelve theundeight hundred and fiftysix, Frank Herronaun received twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, William Winkelman received twelve thousand eight hundred sand fiftyfour, Riehard Kitchelt received twelve thousanda e b hudred and fifty-feur, William ULpet retwel ensin,d sgt ndreSd ffy foswr Willia Neumans vsteetwlve thousand -a4'i mn fyfs,ts OFFICIAL NOTICES4 elved twelve thousand eit hundred and ft two Amenso H. Buttfi received twelve thoi sand eight hunred and Afty-two. Charles Willian son received twelve thousand t hudred at fifty-six, Charles H. Wheeler twelve thoi sand eight hundred and fity-four, Charles S. WI son received twelve thousand eight hundred am fifty-two, Jacob ThisseD received twelve thousam eight hundred and fifty-three, George 0. Jone r celved twelve thousand eight hundred and fift: four, Joseph G. Doll received twelve thousa eight hundred and Afty-ave, George L. Washban received twelve thousand eight hundred and fiftj give. Herman Reich received twelve thousand elr hundred and fifty-five. Julius Gerber -recelve twelve thousand eight hundred and fifty-si Adolph Jablinowski received twelve thousand elgit hundred and fifty-six. Charles W. House receive twelve thouaand six hundred and twenty-two, Ma Forker received twelve thousand six hundred an twenty-one, Christian Bakke received twelve thaW sand six hundred and eighteen, Charles Vollmi received twelve thousand six hundred and tweIv4 James Byrne received twelve thousand six hundre and seventeen, Archie Jarrold received twell thousand six hundred and thirteen. Obarles F. I Walsh received twelve thousand six hundred as ten, Peter Fiebiger received twelve thousand at hundred and eight, John Kelly received twel% thousand six hundred and eight. Richard Goul received twelve thousand @&x hundred and al Ephrim Siff received twelve thousand six hundrv and eleven, John McElroy received twelve tht sand six hundred and eight, Richard Hunter n ceived twelve thousand six hundred and ni< Charles Keveney received twelve thousand si hundred and five, Charles C. Crawford receive twelve thousand six hundred and ten. Frederick ( Fulling received twelve thousand six hundred an eight. Leon R. Pilout received twelve thousan six hundred and four. Magnus Svenson receive twelve thousand six hundred and six. George Abe son received twelve thousand six hundred and fiv Owen Oarraher received twelve thousand six hut dred and six, Mathew Steel received twelve thoi sand six hundred and seven, Albert W. Brower n ceived twelve thousand six hirdred and four, lQ mund Bullent received twelve thousand six hut dred and three, Christian Mahr received twelw thousand six hundred and one, Christian Rossbac received twelve thousand six hundred and tw4 James A. Trainor received twelve thoiisand fiv hundred and ninety-eight, George E. Coffin receive twelve thousand six hundred and one, Frank DanI hoff received twelve thousand six hundred an two, James S. White received twelve thousand at hundred and two, John H. Morris received twelp thousand six hundred and two, Elmer Harrison i ceived twelve thousand six hundred and thre4 Robert Will received twelve thousand six hundre( Charlee A. Ruby received twelve thousand five hal dred and ninety-nine. Charles Nelson receive twelve thousand five hundred and ninety-nin James W. Sharpe received twelve thousand at hundred and three. Robert Johnson received twelv thousand six hundred and four. Blank. satterin Ind defective votes, eighty thousand seven hundre and fifty-three. State of New York. Office oi th Secretary of State, as.: I hereby certify that ti foregoing is a correct statement of the number c votAe cast for all the candidates for the office elector of President and Vice President at the get eral election held November 6, 1900. as shown b the canvass of the state board of canvassers, o file in this office. Given under my hand and set of office this fifteenth day of December, 190( (Seal.) JOHN T. McDONOUGH. Secretary < State. State of New York, as.: We, the secretar of state, comptroller, treasurer and state engine" and surveyor of the said stawe, having formed board of state canvassers, and having canvasse and estimated the whole number of votes cast ft all the candidates for the office of elector of Pres dent and Vice President, at the general electi. held in the said state, on the sixth day of Noven ber. 1900, according to the certified statements < he said votcs, received by the secretary of state, al fled in his office in the manner directed by law, d lereby determine, declare and certify that Edwar Fl. Butler, eancis B. Mitchell, Samuel J. Underhil Samuel Rowland, Michael J. Dady, Charles F Russell, John Kissel, Henry C. Fischer, Josep Simouson, William E. Billings. Herman J. Kati Frank Tilford, Samuel S. Koenig, Arthur I Sturges, James Yereance. Emanuel W. Blooming dale. William Sherer, Frank V. Millard, Clarenc Lexow, John N. Ordts. Peter .Ic)arthy, Samut L. Muns,n, William 13. C. Wiley. Royal Newtot William T. O'Neil. David M. Anderson. R,)bert Ma innon. William G. Phelps, Ransom B. True, Rohei 3ushby. Franklin D. Sherwood, Charles F. Prentict George Eastman. Christian Klinck. George Urbar Jr.. Herbert C. Rich, were, by the greatest numbe of votes given at tbe said election, respectivel elected elector of President and Vice President c the United States. Given under our hands at th office of the secretary of rtate of said state, In th :ity of Albany the twelfth day of December, in tb rear of our Lord oneIthousandninehundred. JOHN'I McDONOUGH. Secretary of State; THEO. F GILMAN. Comptroller: JNO. P. JAECKEL, Tree urer: EDWAlD A. BOND, State Engineer an Surveyor. State of New York, Office of The Secre tary of State. ss.: I certify that I have compare the foregoing with an original certificate filed I this office, and that the same Is a correct trnE script therefrom, and of the whole of such orig Inal. Given under my hand and seal of office. a the city of Albony, this 13th day of Decembei 1900. i8eal.) JOHN T. McDONOUGH, Secretar of State. it WINTER RESORTS. ATLAV%Ift: CITI. f. J. HOTEL DENNOS ATLANTIC CirY'S FAMOUS HOSTELRIE, a now undergoing additions and improvements nd will reopen about January 19. remaining ope hereafter throughout the year. Under new mai igement. WALTER J. BUZBY, Proprietor. de20-26t.10 Successor to Joe. H. Borton. Hotel Traymore, .tiantie City, N. J. Remains open throughout the entire year. Dining room inelosed in glass. Over fifty privat aths attached to suites; salt and fresh water lath n the house. Fver" modern luxury and a ppoint nent. D. S. WHITE, Jr., sel -130t.10 Owner and Proprietor. The Climate at ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., luring the winter months is most equable an tealthy. HADDON HALL, he popular beach front hostelry. Is always oper ;olf links. Hot and cold sea water baths. nol-lotf LEEDS & L[PPLNCOTT. HOTEL LURAY, ATLANTIC CITY. N. J. Open Pavilion and Heated Sun Parlor directl: iver boardwalk. Porches on a level with an otned to boardwalk Sea and fresh private baths. Golf privileges. oc29-10tf JOSIAH WHITE & SON. SEASIDE HOUSE, Atlantic City, N. 3. Ipen all the year. EIvery modern improvement JapaeIty, 300. Golf links. Soc4-78t-6 CHAS. EVANS & SON. THE PENNHURST, lichigan ave.. second house from beach. Ope1 untire year. Elevator .to street level. A spiecla ate for the winter season. Booklet mailed. oc4-156t-5 . JAMES HOOD. MISCELLANEOUS. Lakewood, N. J0. SEASON OF 1900. LAUREL HOUSE AND LAUREL=IN =THE=PllNES: [Juder the Management of DAVID B. PLUMER LAUREL HOUSE, A. J. MURPHY, Assistant Manager. LAUREL-IN-THE-PINES, HORACE PORTER, Associate Manager. de22-20tf P1LNEHURST, North Carolina. Three fine hotels. including the Carolina. th argest in the state. Fifty furnished cottages. Direct connectIon from New York and Boston. i'ULL GOLF COURSE. FINEST IN THE SOUTH Address Resident Manager. Pinehurat, N. C. de12-26t,14 MANICURE. 'ARIS-MARIBOROUGHI PARLOluS-LONDON-. Are hooking engagements for HairdressIng season latest "Coifure;" Complexion and Hand Special lets. 821 Vermont ave., opposIte Arlington Hotel 'Phone '776 de-26t* ACCOUNTANTS. 300KS5 OPENED, STRAIGHTENED OUT ANE balanced by an expert accountant; charges resonable. Address GEO. D. ASHTON, West Ruc National Bank. de20-26t* 3. E. BATEi, Public Accountant and Auditor, Eoom 110, WashIngton Loan and Trust buaildig del-tf 9th and F sts. n.y. Telephone No.0. LADIES' GOODS. E. HIOROAN,. LADEB TAHLOR AND FURIR S00 K IT. N.W. eeS4w,t,u-Sin ). PECK, PRACTICAL FURRIER.-STYLTSR 000 larettes mad from worn furs. Remodeling t present styes at low prIces. Plush garmenti steamed aid made like new. Muflk relined. o1l P st. n.y.. 2id floor, opposIte Masonic Temple. as17-ti Plaiting. a' [NIFE AND ACOORDION PL1 GDOND WITH eu d . ikng e yard. At OPPENHEI UNDERTA KERR. W. R. Speare, Undertaker & Embalmer, 0403 F I'E NORTHWEST. Eserythhlr strk.tiy firat-olas sad est the inet saa iusable terms. Tlaphes= call. 80. g.3-0W J HOWGATE A FREE MAN d Sentenoe of Former Weather Bureau Chief in Penitentiary Expires, a STORY OF ROMANCE AD CRIE t Disclosures Which Created a Sen sation in the Capital City. FLIGHT, RECAPTURE, TRIAL d Capt. Henry W. Howgate. formerly chief of the weather bureau in this city. will tomorrow step forth from the penitentiary at Albany, N. Y., a free nnui. Tius is ended for all time the most interesting criminal and romantic episode perhaps the national capital has ever known. (aptain Howgate, now an old man, was sentenced to imprisonmont in I89, for a period of eight years. The sentence terminates Saturday by reason of good conduct on the part of the prisoner. The belief is that hi. confinement has not bcen very much in the nature of a hardship, for during the entire period e he has been assigned to duty as the librarian of the penitentiary. The supposition is that Captain Howgate will return to this city and make his home with his devoted daughter, Miss Ida Howgate. It will be readily recalled that Captain Howgate was arrested about twenty years ago for the embezz!ement of large sums of money from the government, and for forgery. The disclosure of the crime created a sensation In official and social circles. a In substance the accusation against the L officer set forth that in 1876 he was as' signed to duty in the signal service office and subsequently became the disbursing officer of the bureau, which grew rapidly in y proportion until at length the weather bua reau was organized. Large amounts of money were appropriated for the bureau and this was disbursed by Captain HowV gate. He performed such duty until Sepr tember, 1880, when he was relieved. The a monthly accunts of the Western Union I Telegraph Company, which were in printed r form, each being chargeable to a particu~ lar appropriation, went to Captain Howgate for payment, and It was f charged that certain of the voucha ers were made out by Captain 5 Howgate for fictitious services. To one of these. It was claimed, a signature had been forged, that the defendant had committed i the forgery and thereby had fraudulently obtained 311,800. The Arraignment. & At the time of the discoverey of his embezzlements Capt. Howgate was not In- the city, but was located in Michigan, and was brought here by a special agent of the Department of Justice. He was arraigned ber fore a United States cbmmissioner tinder a r charge of embezzlement, supposed to amount to $40.000, and bail was accepted in ? that sum. The day he was released How3 gate left the city, and the government filed suit to recover $101.257. the amount having been Increased by subsequent developments. I The grand jury, October 21, 1881, reported - an Indictment for embezzlement, and subI sequently several others for the same offense, as well as additional ones for forgery. When Howgate left here after the first arraignment it was supposed he had gone for good, but he suddenly appeared, whereupon r he was rearrested and committed to jail. For several years prior to the discovery of the embezzlements, so It was charged. Capt. Howgate had led a double domestic life . in Washington. Only a short distaice from the home that contained his wife and the daughter who has clung to him so determinedly during his troubles, he supported a woman. Nettle Burrill, In luxurious style. After the arrest Mrs. Howgate and her daughter took possession of the handsome home. 617 13th street. built for Nettle Burrill, the latter being driven therefrom. When the trouble had overwhelmed the captain Nettle Burrill set to work to secure his release. The impression at the time was that Miss Howgate had been no small factor in the escape of her father. But this has never been established. The almost unanimous* opinion was that Nettle Burrill formulated the plans and arranged the avenues of departure so that pursuit would be hopeless. News of the Escape. One evening during the year 1882 the Interesting news spread through the city that Captain Howgate had escaped. He had been in the District jail under.the immediate eye of Warden Crocker and the atithority of United States Marshal Henry The case against the man had proceeded to the extent of the filing of an indictment and his arraignment thereunder. While at the jail the former weather bureau chief was treated with more consideration than are ordinary malefactors. His cell was comfortably furnished and he ate from his own expensive chinaware and silver. The rules of the jail were relaxed to the extent of allowing Captain Howgate to visit his residence on 13th street in order that he might bathe in his own bath room. On the occasion of these visits he was, of course, always accompanied by a deputy United States marshal. Expressing a desire to go to his home, I Captain Howgate entered a carriage Thursday, April 18, 1882, and, in charge of Depu.ty Marshal Dewing and a bailiff, was driven to the 13th street home. After chat.ting a short time with his daughter, he asked her for a change of underclothing. and she proceeded to another room to procure the garments. Upon the return of Miss Howgate to the sitting room from that errand the captain excused himself and ostensibly departed for the bath room, the officers remaining in the sitting room. Miss Howgaste sang for the men in uniform and entertained them so pleasantly that an hour glided by before they requested the young lady to call her fa,ther. She' was gone a long time, and then came back pale and excited. She reported that she could not find her father. The officers searched 'the house from top to bottom and then rushed out and gave the alarm. Escaped the Back Way. By this time Captain Howgate had a start of two hours. He escaped by going out of the rear of the house when he was supposed to go to the bath room, and, proceeding into a blind alley in the rear, turned into a passage running out to G street, where a carriage containing the woman in the case, Nettle Burrill, was awaiting him. A search was Immediately made, but Captain Howgate was not apprehended, although it was notorious that communication was readi.ly established with him when his friends found it necessary for months after his departure. Nettie Burrill returned to Washington two or three days af-ter the escape and was shadowed by detectives, but found no difficulty In eluding them whenever she cared to do so. It was generally believed that Captain Howgate went down the river Immediately upon h.is escape and took up his residence in St. Mary's. It Is stated that he was seen in that locality as late as 1887. He then went to New- Orleans and remained there until he had reason to believe that the secret service officials had located him. He thereupon departed westward and wasr seer at one or two places on the Pacific coast. At the time he was arrested he had been in New York ciety for about two years. Capt. Howgate Rearrested. As the result of the search which occupied the attention of the United States secret service for more than thirteen years, Capt. Howgate was taken into custody in New York city Thursday, Septembher 27, 1804, on the charges of forgery and embesslement of large sums of money during the years 1878 and 1879. Ex-Chief Drurgmond of the secret service, after having searched over nearly the whole country for Howgate, received information that the fugitive was a dealer in old books in New Y~ork city. With a great deal of trouble the fact was disclosed that the man wanted was conducting a book store in the basement of 80 4th avenue, under the name of Harvey Williams. A warrant was secured, which was served by Ex-Chief Drummond in per-. son. .He met Ho'wgate coming -out of a store at 4th avenue and 10th street and said "Hoaw are you, Capt. Howgate?" The fz4gitive Me startled, but quickly yegalning his composure asked Mr. Drummap'a what the 4atter wanted. Upon beig haid, Capt. answerede "AR. rigt., back to Washington. He. was placed on trial in Criminal Court No. 1 Monday. January :8, 114C, after a lapse of more than fifteen years from the time of committing his wrong-doings. Justice McCornas. now a United Siates senator from Marylanl. pres.ded at he tr al. The detendant was ca.lled upon to answcr two of ten indietments growing onut of his offen-ws. In one of the two he wias charged with having embezzled the :zum of 311,A00 mn Octol-er, 18''U, while in the .:hvr it was set forth that "at the same timn Captain Howgate forged the name of Treasurer Roswwell H. Rochester of the Western t nion Telegraph Company for an alleged bill of telegraphie tolls amounting to $1I.SAN. ''The two caseq were consolidated. Mr. Arthur A. Birnoy. then United States attorney for the Dstrict of Columbia, ani Mr. William Meyer Lewin as special assistant attorney. appeared for the governm.nt. while MosTs. A. S. Worthington and Jere M. Wilson reprtsented the defenda'i:. The trial was in progress for more than four weeks. The jury remained in cotsultation for several days. Finally a verdict of not guilty was returned the morning of Sunday. February 24. Additional Indictments and Convietion. United Stat-s Attoriey Birney did not cease his efforts. howcver, for two addltional indictm.nts. one for forgery and the other for violation of sectIon 5421 of the Revised Statutes of the :nited States, were reported against iowgate by the grand jury April 1. lN95. The causes were consolidated and the trial was started June 10, 1.195. leven days lattr a verdict of "guilty, with a recmminiendation of mercy,' was recorded. Justice McConis, July 2. 18I% overruled motions for it new trial and in arrest of judgment and sentenced Captain Howgate to imprisonment iII the Albany penitentiary for four years in each of the two cases, or eight years in all. An appeal to the Court of Appeals was taken, the captain, pending the same, being released on bail in the sum of $15,000. The Court of Appeals affirmed the judment of Criminal Court No. 1. The warrant of removal to the penitentiary was issued November 20. 1sw-p. It was returned executed December 6. ANNOTATED EDITORIALS FROM THE STAR. Inartintle Adwertising. 1 rom the Ashlanl ti's.) Telegram. Speaking in deprecation of the custom of plastering the laidscipe over with unsightly, inartitic and %ulgar advertisng placards, the Wash,ngtui Star truthfully says that the newspaper columns offer today far better facilit.es for the announcement of trade opportunities and new and old commodities than ever before. Tnere are more readers, the art of advertising has developed to a fine point and the readers have been trained to read and study the trade notices. There are more newspapers, too, and the merchant or the manufacturer with a communication to make to the publie is not compelled to resort to unubual methods. Success does not necessarily follow those methods. it does follow the consistent empik,yment of printer's ink. This is quite apart from the consideration of the public which is inv,lved in the obtrus ion of trade announcements on the street corners, the lamp posts, the waste boxes. the fences. the sky. the very pavement. It is not difficult to foresee the time when an aroused public opinii wil demand the enactment of laws to restrict adlvertisements to their proper sphere and to prevent the disfigurement of the landscape and the municipal utdaties. The President and Cabinet. From the OsNego tN. I.) Times. The Washington Star tind.) has this to say of the PtesAdent's action in asking the cabinet members to remain with him during h,s second term, action thoruughly characteristic of the man and altogether justified by the situation: "The cabinet aA it stands is one of the most harmonious and effective ever organized. It is notable in its aggregated strength a.nd its individual componetits. it is a wtiking cabinet, every memser capable of atteiinoing in person to the details of h.s depai tmental duties. It is entirely in harmony with tile admin.stration's policies. It is calcuiated to strengthen the Pres,dent's position both at home and abroad, and to aivance hi purposes in all d.rections. It enjoys the coairfence of the public service and of the country at large." -Mr. Hay. From the Wilmington (Del.) Every Evening. A curious piece of intelligence was placed the other day in a political article primted by the repub.ican Washing,on Star: "If Mr. hay remains in the cao.net it Is believed tnat our foreign relations will present questions of greatest moment within the next two Years." Why should the character of the foreign questions to arlse depend upon Mr.. Hay - continuation in the State Department? Will he raise them? Bryanism and Clevelandism. From the Buffalo Cornniercial. The Washington Star states the case exactly when it says that C.evelandism and Bryanism are radically anaginistic. "As Bryanism drove Cleveland,sm out of the party, Clevelandism, if readmitted, would as certainly drive Bryan-m out. Bryanbam still means something, and must sci be reckoned with." The President's Crown. Prom the liuscatine tiowa) Journal. The Washington Star observes that th* anti-imperialists are disappointed In not discovering that Mr. Mclvimey has ordered himself a crown for the 4th of next MarcD. But he doesn't need any oter crown, aS his htead is all rignt with its old crown. Addick. as a Trainer. From the Wilmington tDel.) Star. The Washington Star facetiously and fe. licitously remarks that Mr. Addicks hopes he will soon have the Delaware legislature trained so that it will come up and eat out of his hand. The Murder of Auditor Morris. From the Cleveland Leader. It is revolting, but nevertheless true, aczording to the dispatches from Washington, that some of the clerks in the depart-, ments at Washington commend the brutal murder of Auditor Frank H. Morris of the War Department. These are persons who share the belief that Mr. Morris was oppressive because he exacted an honest day's work from the clerks under his supervision. That was the only complaint that was made against him, and that was the reason why he was stricken down bY an assassin. Mr. Morris was truly a martyr to the cause of honesty in the public service, and his death ought to lead to a shaking tip in the departments which will serve to teach1 the indolent government employes that something is expected from them besideS the mere occupying of their office chairs and the drawing of their salaries on the regular pay days. Tis is a good tIme to institute a wholesome reform. When Mr. Morris assumed the position of aWditor for the Navy Deaartment he found the' business of his department two years anid a half behind. Within a period of ten months, or therebhouts. he had brought all the business up 0 date, and he won by hIs industry and the txercise of rare executive abIlIty the oomnendation ol' the officials of the treasury. If the administration desires to proS4 'rom the fruits of Mr. Morris' labors, aD ixecutive order shoul be issued, enforcing n all the departments the same sort et lisciplineO that was maintained in the dirisions over which Mr. Morris had super. rision. Let It be understood that hereafter ivery clerk or other offBcial in the goverantent's employ must give an honest day's work for the compenation be reosiveg. L'hat seems little to ask when it is remmered that the clerks in the departmebts ire required to work but six and a halt tours a day, and are entitled yearly to a nonth's vacation with pay. and an annuat ick leave of thirty days with sy-ndivery clerk is sick thirty days a year, en what may. Men drawing good saaig mnder such conditions have little ause to :omplain, and much less cause to exul4 >ver the murder of a superior who cmselled them to give honest seriee to the roverntment. Dig Ca=al Sehemme in New York. A barge canal, costing AO,000,000 fq. owing very closely the present Dioes he Erie canal, except that while be large cIties it may not biseet ths hat state Enar Bond of Nev Yil ill recommnend to the legislasases en'. ibout February 12. It is probaWeis 7 ilectricity will be recommended flor m >ower. Lieut. Goev. Timothy L. edrf sla. in Albany last night. Is be recommendations will be rel ;he leislaor. He asserted the weryvihr of the esna A&tesg g ss the

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