The Times from Shreveport, Louisiana on April 10, 1938 · Page 18
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The Times from Shreveport, Louisiana · Page 18

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Shreveport, Louisiana
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Sunday, April 10, 1938
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Page 18
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THE SHREVEPORT TIMES SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 1938 BOLT BOYS PACE MUNY EIGHTEEN GOLFERS BROTHERS TIE FOR MEDAL IN ANNUAL MEET AH Favorites Squeeze Into Championship Kouiid New Heavyweight Mat Champ ion Classed With Old Title Holder Casey Rated Belter Than Any Crown Bearer Since Gotch The Bolt brothers, Tommy ana J. B., two of the Mmiy's outstanding shounakers, showed the way to star-studded field of local golfers to tie for medal honors In the third annual spring Invitation tournament at the Lakeside Park Golf c!ut by posting par rounds of 68. J. B. Bolt, the first of the two sterling nlbllc wlelders to post his score, rounded the turn In 34, and returned la the same figures, while Tommy, probably the finest amateur ever produced at the municipal ciub, was out In 33 and same back in 35 to assure himself a shot at the medal award. Seventy-four players posted scores with Professional Frank Cook to make up five flights of 18 players each. Match play opens Sunday when all first round battles must be completed or contestants will be forced to default. Edwin McClure, former Louisiana State champion, and Capt. H. C. Win-berry, winner of the Labor day title two years ago, finished in second place with identical cards of 72, while Kermit Slstrunk, young Muny star, who paced the qualifiers until Saturday's play, wound up in third place with a 73. No casualties marked the qualifying test with every local star making the championship bracket. Several outstanding matches are scheduled for the opening round when Fred Odom and Winberry meet In perhaps the mast spirited battle on the card. Tom , Bolt will meet Arthur Burroughs in the upper half and J. B. Bolt takes on Austin Robinson In the lower division. Bill Jones and Kermit Slstrunk will meet to see who takes on the winner of the Odom - Winberry match, while Vance Llddell, the city champion from Broadmoor, will play Lieut. J. H. Payne from Barksdale for t;-,e right to play either Tom Bolt or Burroughs. Scores of 80 or better made the title flight without a play-off for the championship race. First round pairings In the championship flight are as follows: Tommy Bolt vs. Arthur Burroughs Vance Llddell vs. Lieut. J. H. Payne H. C. Winberry vs. Fred Odom. Kermit Slstrunk vs. Bill Jones. xJ. B. Bolt vs. Austin Robinson. H. W. Blackburn vs. Red Garrison Ed McClure vs. Lloyd Hendrlck. Hervey Parvino vs. T. L. Morris. First round pairings are as follows: First Flight L. 8. Schull vs. John Spataro Floyd Mulkey vs. C. E. McDermott; Jack Bradfleld vs. Roy Wilson; Phil Barnett vs. Bryant Heirs; J. A. Gulce vs. E. W. Bankston; Dan Dodez vs. Al Stolen Frank Mepna vs. Bill Coker; Cecil Bass vs. Ed Nelson. Second Flight John Hardin vs. Bruce Llddell; Norman Fox vs. John Taylor; M. S. Garrison vs. H. W. Maddox; Fulton Spence vs. M. D. Evans: Ed Ware vs. T. L. Adams; Bill Price vs. S. J. Crump; Harry Balcom vs. George Cooper; Crawford Womack vs. Cecil Pigot. Third Flight. Clyde Alen vs. M. W. Carlson; Cornell Winn vs. Hugh Morris; Bill Washburn vs. Dan Dunn; J. B. Jackson vs. Red Evans; 8am Fulco vs. Joe McMeel; O. R. Butler vs. M. P. Atkins; John Wakeman vs. Felix White; C. L. Davis vs. Bill Grabill. Fourth Flight. D. L. Dickey vs. Bye; Jack Comegys vs. W. F. Peyton; J. S. Reily vs. Bye; Glenn Smith vs. Bye: Pierce Knighton vs. Bye; Eddie Laborde vs. Conly Gibson; R. H. Nelson vs. Bye; Frank Lavere vs. Bye. Qualifying scores are as ofllows: Tom Bolt, 68, J. B. Bolt, 68, Edwin McClure , 72 H. C. Winberry, 72, Kermit 8istrunk, 73. Hcrvcy Parvino, 76, Vance Llddell, 76, H. W. Blackburn, 76, J. H. Payne, 77, Red Garrison, 79, Bill Jones. 79, T. L, Morris, 79, Fred Odom, 80, Austin Robinson, 80, L. L. Hendrlck, 80, L. S. Schull, 81, Arthur Burroughs, 81, J. A. Gulce, 81. Frand Megna, 82, Jack Bradfield, 82, Cecil Bass. 82. Phil Barnett, 82, Dan Dodez, 83, Floyd Mulkey, 83, Ed Bankston, 84, Al Staetr, 84, Ed Nelson, 84, Bryant Heirs, 84, Roy Wilson, 85, Bill Coker, 85, John Spataro, 86, E. Hardin, 86. Ed Ware, 86, George Cooper, 86, Fulton Spence, 87, M. S. Garrison. 87, Crawford Womack, 88, Bill Price, 88, Norman Fox. 89, 8. J. Crump. 89. John Taylor, 89, Cecil Plgott. 89, M. D. Evans, 89. H. W. Maddox, 90, Harry Balcom 61, Sam Fulco, 92. Clyde Allen, 92, Bruce Llddell, 92. T. L. Adams, 92, John Wakeman, 93, J. B. Jackson, 93, Bill Washburn, 93, O. R. Butler, 84, C. L. Davis, 94, Cornell Winn, 95, Dan Dunn, 96, Red Evans, 96, M. W. Atkins, 96, Hugh Morris, 96, Bill Grabul, 96, Felix White, 97, M. W. Carlson, 97, Joe McMeel, 97, Pierce Knighton, 99, R. H. Nelson, 99, D. S. Dickey, 99, J. S. Reily, 101, Glen Smith, 102, Frank Lavere, 102, Eddie Laborde, 103, Jack Comers, 104, W. f. Peyton, 107, and Conley Gibson, 119. Six of the Canadian-American league's eight clubs are located in the United States. Steve "Crusher" Casey, the recently crowned heavyweight wrestling champion, comes to Shreveport for an engagement Monday night classed as the greatest tltleholder since the days of Frank Gotch. Eastern critics of the grappling art rate Casey superior to Ed Lewis when the strangle-hold expert was at his best, and many old-timers say that the big young Irishman Is even greater than Ootch or George Hack- enschmldt, the Russian Lion. Casey, who is fast as a bantam, has the strength once possessed by Hack-enschmldt, but not musclcbound as was the famous Russian. He Is credited with the endurance of Tom Jenkins, who won fame for long matches in which he engaged, and Iibb the ring generalship of the Immortal Gotch. Casey is aggressive and has a fighting Irish heart. Casey hails from Sneem, County Kerry, Ireland, and has six brothers and three sisters and every member of his family Is built along gigantic lines The "Crusher" has been wrestling several years. He won over 200 bouts in Europe before deciding to Invade America. He came to this country after learning of Danno C'Mahoncy's success. He has not been defeated In 100 bouts In the United States and won the championship from Louis Thesz, 44 days after the young Hungarian had dethroned Everett Marshall, who defeat ed Alt Baba for the title in Columbus, Ohio, June 26, 1936. Casey will be making his first ap pearance in the soutnwest in nis match in Shreveport. His opponent will be the Masked Marvel, a young giant, under management of Count Pietro Rossi. The Marvel, since sign ing with Rossi, has kept his Identity hid behind a heavy black disguise. Ho stands better than six feet tall and weighs around 240 pounds. So far no opponent has successfully pinned the Meryl's shoulders twice in one evening In bouts here, .tossl readily accepted the match for the championship, after declining to accept other foes of lesser importance. An old wrestling rivalry will be revived in the semi-final when Alabama Billy Lee and Juan Humbcrto of Mexico, clash for the best two falls out of three, one-hour time 'tmlt. Lee and Humberto have been campaigning in the southwest for some time and getting In each other's way Both are anxious for main bouts here. Lee will probably rule favorite. He has displayed better wrestling form In recent matches here than the Mexican. Sol Slagle, the "rubber man," and Angelo Clstoldl, the fiery Italian, will clash In a one-fall contest that will usher In Monday night'a program. Promoter Julius Slgel says there will be no Increase In admission price for the championship program. (Continued From I'retntlnt rse.) I.ongvlrw before (lie game with the Glnnls was finished, however, was not to (he best Interest of organized baseball. The fans are Interested In the feud between the squads only from the fighting spirit it Injects into the contests. When they pay their money they expect to see a contest rompleled a winner dei'Mfd unless the elements Interfere. Many persons had traveled honri to tee the exhibition at I.ongvlew and Vltt should have taken this Into consideration. Judge Keneaaw I.andin, always eager to rush forth as a protector or the national pastime, In his position as baseball commissioner, has not lifted a finger, so far as we know, to reprimand the Cleveland club for quitting. A report came out of Longview that the sponsors of the game had held up the Indians' share of the Rate receipts. If this Is correct, the game sponsors have acted wisely. The Cleveland club did not complete its contract. We hope the Indians' pay check will go to some worthy charity. Cleveland protested after a putout by Jules Bolters In a crowd was permitted to go for a two-base hit. The team managers had previously agreed that a hit Into the crowd would be a two-bagger. This ruling was to protect both teams. Bolters knew when he charged Into the crowd for the put-out he was entering Into a restricted zone. SHORT SPORT JABS Bobby Rels, Boston's pltchcr-lnficlier-outfieldcr. has a peculiar record left over from last year. He pitched in four games but didn't win or lose, but his earned run average was a low 1.80 . . , After campaigning for some time as a light-heavyweight, Lou Broulllard has returned to the middleweight division. He la a former champion middleweight and also welterweight ... In three complete games, Baltimore Oriole pitchers didn't allow Nashville to score a run . . . Atley Donald, Yankee pitching recruit, threw the discus at college, while Joe Beggs claims tossing the Javelin helped him to become a winning pitcher . . . Sid Cohen, the pitcher Washington sold to Baltimore, can throw overhand, side-arm or submarine style and does so regularly. 1 TRAINING CAMP NOTES (Continued From Preerdinc Fast.) latest acquisition, played at short stop. New Iberia, La., April 9 (JP). With seven New Iberia errors making It all the easier, the St. Louis Cardinals toyed with their Evangeline league "Farmhands," winning pretty much as pleased; 12 to 3. Enos Slaughter, Johnny Mize and recruit Pitcher Howard Krlst banged out home runs. Rocky Mount, X. c., April 9 (). Taking Paul Derringer for 10 hits which netted seven runs, the Red Sox defeated the Cincinnati Reds 11 to 2 here today. Jim Bagby, who pitched four ln-lngs, retired 10 men in order before Lang and Campbell singled. The Reds, getting seven hits, made one run off Johnny Marcum and the other off lefthander Archie McKaln. Fort Worth, Texas, April 9 (VP). Led by Bill Brubaker and Johnny Rizzo, the Pittsburgh Pirates cele brated their release from a two day period of forced Idleness today by thumping the Chicago White Sox, 13 to 8, In an exhibition game. The Bucs nade 25 hits off three Sox hurlers for a total of 38 bases. Brubaker and Rizzo contributed four apiece, while Arky Vaughn added a home run to his collection of three. Arrow - I I SHIRTS For a Smart EASTER An amazing collection of really fine shirts by two of America's outstanding shirtmak-ers. Here you will find only the newest . . . the smartest in fine shirts for Spring and Easter wear. - $2.00 to $3.50 The MALLORY New EASTER NECKWEAR, $1.00 to $3.50 S T O WA WAY Memphis, Tenn.. April 9 (P). After spotting the Memphis Chicks three runs in the third Inning, the New York Giants rallied In the last four frames today to defeat their Southern Association rivales to 3 in an ex hibition game. Cliff Melton, who pitched the full route, gave up only eight hits but the Chicks bunched four of them, Including Reese's triple, in the third. Carmen Barth, middleweight, who recently lost to Freddie Steele, was a member of the 1838 Olympic team. FISHERMEN ATTENTION! All lulling Points on Highway 1 Mop at TED'S PLACE i MILK ON COl'SHATTA KOAU tor RrrakfaKt and Lunelle for Your Party Vft Serve SIl.EX Brewed Coffee Kavannah, Ga., April 9 (P). De feated 6-2 In their special feature with the Savannah Indiana today, the Boston Bees could blame most of It onto John Nlggerling, their temporary pitching "gift" to the Indians, and Charlies Marsella, who Joined the Warriors after the Stegel crew discarded him. Nlggerllng's knuckle-balling for Savannah limited the hits of his erstwhile mates to eight, while Marsella's hittln" accounted for four of his team's tallies with a single and a home run. John Scalzi, new Manhattan assistant football coach, had a year with the Brooklyn pros In football and a season with the Boston Bees in baseball after leaving Georgetown. Annistor., Ala., had no more than gotten into the Southeastern league ''hen Its park burned to the ground. CITY READY TO SUPPORT LOCAL FLAG CHASERS (Continued I rom I'rrredins Pairl Workouts are scheduled at the local park Monday and Tuesday. Business Manager Walter Morris announced that box seats and re served seat tickets will go on sale Monday morning at the Morris-Dick son drug store In the Slattery build ing. General admission tickets will not be put on sale until probably Tuesday. . Shreveport will enjoy a half-linllflay Wednesday for the opening of the baseball season. A street parade, headed by S. 3. Flores, ihlef of the fire department, will serve to advertise tne first game. The parade will start at one p. in., and will be through the business district. Hlirpveport players, headed by Manager Jon-nurd, and the Di-aumont team, with Al Vincent as leader, will ride In automobiles, The game Is slated to start at 3:30 o'clock. LOOK r'OK (Jl)OIJ WEATHER Dallas, Texas, April 9 (). Shy weathermen over the Texas League, busy recording snow, sleet and rain the past few days, got about as far out on the limb as honest weathermen venture today and opined spring weather would prevail for Wednes day's opening of the loop's golden Jubilee year. One new club, one brand new manager, two slightly "soiled" skippers, and scores of strange faces appeared In the lineup for start of the fiftieth J car. Only five managers who started the '37 race were back for more. They included Homer Peel, Port Worth; Zach Taylor, San Antonio; Al Vincent, Beaumont; Bruce Connatser, Tulsa, and Jim Keesey, Oklahoma City. Red-thatched Ray Brubaker arrived Just In time to get In on the tallend of Dallas' losing streak last year and Ira Smith came back to Houston after a brief fling with u St. Louis Cards. Peel's Fort Worth Panthers, Texas and Dixie champions, were back with almost the same lineup, with the giarlng exception behind the plate where Vera Mackle has filled a spot considered weak last season. Tagged as a team not to be trifled with Is' Houston, peppered with newcomers and strengthened by a St. Louis management that wants o bring in a Texas League pennant. None are counting too heavily, how ever, on Paul (Daffy) Dean, the major leaguer with the sore arm, to come through. Oklahoma City, full season winner last year, comes back with a slightly altered lineup which, If anything will make them more potent than ever. San Antonio and Beaumont sgaln are experimenting with youngsters while Dallas has a rebuilt model featuring some fast aging gents auch as Phil Todt, first base; Bob Penner, catcher; Fred Fussell and Sal Gllatto, pitchers. Tulsa, Its Infield troubles about straightened out, can go -I its hurlers come around In better form than shown In spring games. . LOCAL NEGRO TEAM, LITTLE ROCK CLUB PLAYS HERE TODAY 3hreveport Tigers, local negro professional team, will usher in its 1938 campaign Sunday afternoon at Palace Park with a double header. The Tigers,-who formerly played at the local Dixie league grounds, will take on the Black Travelers of Little Rock In two games this afternoon, with starting time set for 2:30 o'clock. The Tigers plan to play games each Sunday during the sum-met' at Palace park against leading negro professional clubs of the southwest. At least five new players have been added to the Shreveport club. The team has been In training for about two weeks. Several members of the Tigers played with another local team Monday that defeated the Homestead Grays, of the negro national league. Candid Camera Fans to 'Shoot' Sailboat Races (Continued From Preceding Taxe.) changes In the rigging has aoaea much speed. It did not participate In the Initial event last week. Skippers in the snipe group will In clude Elliott, Embry, Tooke and Sum ner. The MOtn entries inciuucs diii Morris, Charles Barney, Dale Hendrlck, E. E. Parker, Mrs. O. H. Berry-man, Romer Dudley, H. Stacey and M. McKlnnon. New Grid Conference May Be Formed In Texas Dallas, Texas, April S (JP).-Charles Munves, grid coach at Terrell prep school, said tonight a new football conference may be organized In Texas and be, ready to play a regular schec ule by next fall. Representatives from .seven schools In north and central Texas will meo', tomorrow morning at Terrell prep to discuss the organization of a private school conference, Munves said. Munves said schools to be repre sented at the meeting are Westminster college, Texas Military college, Decatur Baptist, Wichita Falls college, Denton Demonstration school and Terrell prep. INDIANS HAVE HURLING, PLUS HITTING POWER New York racing men believe the state will have pri-mutul betting In 1939. Progress on legalising machine betting is reported as satisfactory. COLLEGE BASEBALL At Baton Rouge Louisiana vs. Mississippi State, double-header, cancelled, cold. Dutch Ruether, former big league pitching star, is working for the Cubs again. He will scout on the Pacific Coast this year. (Continued From Precrdlns Pase.t and make it tougher for everybody. National League CHICAGO The Cubs look grand. Team should have won the pennant last year. Grimm can count on better pitching and better balance, and a fine man to have around in Tony Lazzcrl. ST. LOUIS Cardinals are improving weak spots and will get better day's work out of the pitching staff this year. Picked up some pretty fair country hitters out of the chain stores, too. , PITTSBURGH Better all around, especially pitching, with younger hurlers ready to click. This Johnny Rlzzo la a pretty good outfielder and hitter they say. NEW YORK The Giants should have finished fourth last year, and can't expect to have all the luck, Hubbell Is getting along in years. How about Castleman? How about Whitehead, who had his appendix snatched. CINCINNATI Another ball club with a smart manager. Pitching la better than It seemed last year. Dei-lnlte Improvements in infield and outfield. BOSTON Good pitching but the hitting still is off. Casey Stengel knows baseball well enough to, but he can't hypnotize swingers Into hitters. BROOKLYN Pitching under par. Improvement at other points not enough. Notre Dame has bright baseball prospects with nine of 13 1937 letter-men back on the diamond under Coach Jake Kline. Navy's golf team this year will meet Virginia, Princeton, Georgetown, Washington and Lee and Penn. , . . Americas Finest Lightweight Hat! .pT-v Jk- 1 ' I L-,( t 4 " J JLjl , -V : m:a i:- I'll 0 A S V"X '" f ""'HI m f (Al , fey : -"I . fu?? i V ' lit-' I ; 4 1 f , i ; KA'i' I -'J s 1 I if -A fl - V: IP IS a v. It's a Spring o h I f color j I I 5? armony in men s (GsaltoaM-allflim Smultts J25 '-6. Color here . . . Color there . . . Color everywhere! Easter-time is truly a season of color . . . and man is more color-conscious than ever in the past. You'll find in Selber Bros, outstanding collection of Gabardines such interesting shades as: Carolina Blue, Breaker luBe, Cloud Grey, Silver Grey, Forest Green, Erin Green, Desert Tan and Copper. Every suit handsomely styled for Easter wear and through Summer. THE STUDENT GABARDINE Extremely popular stylet in the new "Iridescent" shades of Green and Blue. Single and double-breasted models, also sports back models. THE AVON DALE GABARDINE A finer cloth than is usually seen in suits at this price, plus tailoring of character. Single and double-breasted, including smart sports back models. THE SANTA ANITA GABARDINE Stressing again the importance of Gabardine for Spring. The Santa Anita suits include shaded herringbones and blended stripes on regular diagonal weave. $g05O $ 37 50 The "Stowaway" Hat is the lightweight hat with a different pitch and poise from the common run. It has a sportsmanlike air all its own. In every spring color. do' 9 1 1 Individual ShopsMEN aWOMEN CHILDREN PARK IRtE AT HODGES' WHILE SHOPPING HERE 3 Other Fine Clothing LONGWORTH WORSTED $38.50 The EAGLE DRAPE ....$42.50 HICKEY-FREEMAN $55 4 I 4 '9 A I 1 I 1 I 1 I I J I s . YU !r amount office "i vtf a Se IbC pros- Uli s lnlivi,!unlShoiHMEN.V()MEN.(llllDnEN P.IRK I'REK AT HODGES' WHILE SHOPPING HERE A new one is being erected.

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