The Delta Democrat-Times from Greenville, Mississippi on July 17, 1960 · Page 17
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The Delta Democrat-Times from Greenville, Mississippi · Page 17

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Greenville, Mississippi
Issue Date:
Sunday, July 17, 1960
Page:
Page 17
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Leland Trio Tells Of THp To The West '.GLAND = Tfifer 15o9 gfsdu riles of Greenville liigh School KOldry Club TliUfsdfty tfir IOJF watk motor \Ato the Rocky Mountain told Ih* ab«tl( I cation states'. Introduced Ky C. A. Tale, Bolj Main described the (rip wiille Kit ton Walts find Jimmy Patterson pointed dill spots on a hiap the Hires had visited, They (ravell- ed nt a iflM sedan delivery truak aild Slept oft sleeping bags atld nihllfpsa^ Ift the t)atk of \i, They got homo with 52 between them. In Texas they got ''raw 1 steaks, visited 6 SaW mill and the Alnmo and got in a big game of Itecp away at a Cttmlry Club LOS ANOELB8 fAP) sU llCfo ftrG Working oft i ports two! neat- Sail Ait|e!o. In New We rriaehlr»sifnllir te ths big Medico (h«y walked through (wart-lung device u**d ntw in operations Which odllld Carlsbad Cavern?! and a mart horseback fidinj trip through ihe e»Ve vlcllfiis of sivert ihotil, tillfiS of Indian PUetilKi it] M(JSS Verde Park. The GafdeH (A (hfe Q«ls, UK Air Force Aesdehiy add two la- Zy days in Colorado Springs were included a itop in chayemw, r«im bow (rout and toll of masciulldes In Yellowstone 1 Park and a b£ar raid 611 (heir tamp lee box, Jackson Hole and Grand TcWn Park were other stops. A snowball fight was included. In the Black Hills of South Dakota thoy got into » buffalo ***** ANNUAL HALF PRICE SALE ORANGE FLOWER SKIN FRESHENER /or Art Or norm) ikln, A 406), ( F a f n n l lotion Ihftt ltnt, tt- finrl, m o i l l U H i « l . . , l o jive you · ()«ial freih completion. 2Z 01. Ri!*. UM, now J u j l TEXTURE LOTION (or i l o r m k l or «llx Ikta. I*»«nd«r.llntfd, «ir r«- treihm«nl...r«m«r«i txtttt e l l . . . t t l m u l t « i . , . Ifirel ikin roiy, rtdUhtl Si 01. Ret. |(.OI), now Jnst KM. D O R O T H Y G R A Y Booth-Daves Drug Slore 842 Washington ED 2-0504 New Heart-Lung Machine Tested 'The dovico Is desists! ts tak« /er in an an grgency tits Milan of both the heart Mid lungs. 1 v'otopefs My It wdlllo 1 b« useful f6f Victim* of he»H attacks, tie* tfifl IhOOt, rlSir-dfOWfltng or ·*- Vere burns. Present heart · lUhg machines are too big (a UsS outside 1 of hospitals, A prototype" of tho deVic* i» under development at tlis Veterans Administration center here drouth » MJ,oM grant awarded Ust week to ths UCLA Mtdfcml School by the U, S. Public Health Service. In (he model now being tested on the end of » plastic tub* Is rijerted Into an artery, to pump blood through the body while »n-| other lube. Inserted into a vein,! drains blood back to tlw machine! 'or oxygenftlion. stampede. Last extended stop on their trip Was Mount Nebe State Park in Arkansas whore they got Involved in a Fourth of July square dance. The group agreed that: Texas had the prettiest girls. New Mexico the belt roadi, Colorado the best scenery, South Dakota had nothing much, Nebraska nothing at all, Kansas w» a big wheai field, Arkansas had the worst roads and Mississippi was home, Jittal Clearance ENTIRE STOCK OF ... DRESSES * BLOUSES SKIRTS * JEWELRY AND SPORTSWEAR PRICE ALL SALES CASH AND FINAL!! OF OUR ENTIRE STOCK Women's Summer Shoes At A Great Saving To Yoi! Choose From Deiiso Debs - Accents Rhythm Steps All Wlilt* And White Combination! Pastel Green, Bone, Grey Pearl SUMMER FLATS and ITALIAN SANDALS SD.9.) Values Now Reduced To ALL SALES CASH AND FINAL THOMAS f H O P P I N O CENTER' ' SHOE DEPARTMENT Icjf mil, bn5 Cleveland builder kbj« lURtllig Wit a tl6Us6 every 21 dyS laSi wlhlef; juil ai 3 did ihe sunirner before; Robert Brown covered hit LAKE WASHINGTON SCENE - An ancient cypress makes a graceful illhoodla that may have graced tho shores of Laki So !· Its Present Lake Washington s Past Full Of Beauty, Sport And Rich Soil Washington when civilization reached its banks In 1827. (Staff Photo) an unloaded ox wagon, drawn by ne yoka cf oxen, was driven en irely across and back to its start ng point, Linden Plantation. By HARRY MARSH There have been great changes since civilization first came to the Delta but tho Delta's birthplace, the Lake Washington area and land west ot it to the Mississippi River, still has the same attractions it did back in 1827 wher Washington Count)' was created by the new State of llissisi- The first settlers came to Lake Washington because its broad waters and dense forests offered an abundance of game and fowl and breathtaking natural b e a u t y . They still do. Fishermen come from as far away as Texas to . ply its waters, operating from Roy's Store or a dozen other interesting stores and boat docks stretching from Glen Allan north ward. || The first settlers also found jldeep, rich Delta soil and bountiful harvests still come from its shore* every year. Worth The Time '; Located 20 miles couth ! Greenville, Lake Washington | worth a lot of time to sportsmen and to people interested in Delta history and beauty. A leisurely || motor trip to see Erwin Planta: lion House, the ruins of St. | John's Episcopal Church and reenfield Cemetery, S t e i ns tore -- the most typical of old me plantation area stores stil! round picturesque Glen Allan M shimmering lake and its beau- ful border of cypress trees is a ay well spent. Visitors will get something ol ic thrill that the first settler did Just exactly who was the first settler? It may have been Junus Ward. It may have been : rederick G. Turnbull. It ma; i«ve been William B. Prince. Or t may have been someone else ilany of their stories were toi' 50 years ago to the Washington County Historical Society a n d printed in tha Greenville Democrat and Greenville Times. Here, from the Papers of the Vashington County Historical So- iety, are some of the events if 130 yean ago on Laka Wash- ngton. Junhis Ward's Story When Junitts Ward rode his Krse down General Andrew Jacfc- ·»n's trail from Kentucky to New Means, ho paused on the banks of the Yazco River where Indians told him "o( the marvelous and and abundance of game in the regions toward the sunset, along the banks of the big river." Ward had an adventurous spir- t and on that day sometime be- 'ore 1827, he turned his horse westward and guided by three In- at a low place. By bayou he poled his way into Lake Washington, staked a claim, cleared some land, put up puncheon cabins and went home for more help, his wifa and t w o small boys. R e t u r n i n g , they lived in two log rooms chinked with mud with a hall between and porches front and back. This was the beginning of Linden, described by Mrs. Gracia T. Walton to the Historical Society in 1910, as one of the most Iwspifablc homes in the state of Mississippi. "The great abundance of game, fish, water fowl, deer and bear gave a sufficiency of table delicacies," said Mrs. Walton. The bear were nuisances destroying provisions in their search for food. Mrs. Walton said other earlier dians traveled to the northwest settlers were William Eley, Wil- shore of Lake Washington n e a r ' what is now Erwin Plantation. S. M. Spencer in 1910 told t h e Washington County Historical Society that Ward was the first white man to settle on Lake Washington. He traveled home and loaded a latboat with provisions and equipment. Then he floated down the river and landed at a bend of the river five miles from his destina- .ion which he named Kentucky Bend. His provisions and equipment were taken by hand barrow from the bank of the river to the bank of the lake where he built a log cabin and Heured patents from the government for a part of tiie new-! ly-created Washington County, Mississippi. I Turnbull's Story Late in 1828 a young Jefferson County planter named Frederick G.| Turnbull and four slaves made a flatboat and poled it along tho near-flooding river until it ran out liam Drumgool, W. B. Prince, Albert Metcalfe, Jonathan McCaleb, Andrew and Ambrose Knox. Turnbull's tremendous tracts of land was parcelled into plantations -- Linden, Glen Allan, Wildwood, Richland, Otterbourne, the Alps and one bought by Albert Dunbar of Natchez. "Everybody's home was on the bank of the lake and in passing from one place to another either bateaux or skiffs were used, there was a great deal of entertaining." said Mrs. Walton. A last frigid note. In 1828 I,ake Washington froze from bank to bank. Tho thickness aixl strength of the ice was such that WORK Reft erne Sundjiy, July 17, 'QO 17 building isltes with a gtani, 1,200 ptxind, wam-alr-lnfhted nylon shelter 1 , 106 feet long hnd iO feet Wide. Your favorite wash fogs deserve Sanitotte Dry C/edn/ng at Greenville Steam Laundry Why risk their smartness with home laundering? Sanl. tone gelt out all that ground-in dirt, all those itubbom spots. Colors stay bright, white keeps Its sparkle- Ihrough cleaning after cleaning. Style-Set*, our exclusive Sanitone finish, reitorej "body," protects original shape and fit, Dlwover how our nationally advertised Sanitone dry Cleaning laves you money, because It preserve* imartneis, makes clothes last longer. Call on us -Judge for yourself, 24 H O U R S E R V I C E | GreenvilieSteam LAUNDRY - DRY GLEANERS 229 SOUTH WALNUT TELEPHONE ED 2-5483 Branch Office Thomas Shopping Center LOW COST i"("C i|'S : ijiM 1 ) ''., ,, _ ,. |CONyENIENTTERM$ DTi ^ | INSURANCE INCLUDED f PROMPT ACTION I CREPIT'BUILD : UP If you're cfwsBB jwr ur, m us for fliin-fjctJ befwiyoy buy] Commercial National Bank Main Oflici -- Wail Highway Branch -- I Drivt In Facility -- Jutl Of) Wo%Wn,)}»n fed*ret D»p«tJl Iftitrranc* Carp. Don't Miss-** OUR STOREWIDE SUMMER C L E A R A N C E ..... 50% as you save up Don't Miss* Fall selections in Sportswear and Casual Clothes -- irgest selection in the Delta. E N T I R E STOCK Women's Summer D R E S S E S OFF N O W Entire Stock Women's Summer $ SKIRTS one low price 95 Entire Stock Women's Summer *) 5 BLOUSES £m for ENTIRE STOCK WOMEN'S SUMMER HATS 3 GROUPS $-1 00 $000 $0 00 L O U D O SHOPPE Highway SI E»s1

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