The Daily Messenger from Canandaigua, New York on January 8, 1948 · Page 3
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The Daily Messenger from Canandaigua, New York · Page 3

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Thursday, January 8, 1948
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*":':·;··:{ ONTARIO 'GAI4JW1W' 1JM Founded IMS --HOMT t MQGM. Consolidated IMS THE DAILY AOSSENOEB Founded 1M7 Established in 1797. Vol. 151. No. 6. 7 The Weather Considerable etoodinew, not so void in welt and South por- ;/Friday Marshall Asks CANANDAIGUA, N. Y., THURSDAY, JANUARYfc194$ Single Copy, Five Cento City Okays Slightly Higher Budget -- *. _--, ^^- ^^ 1948- Expenses Set at $212,000 In Canandaigua Increased Salaries 'Chief Reason for Slight Increase Over Last Year The common council, meeting at city hall last night, adopted a budget of $212,209,52 for 1948. This is $6,123.06 more than for 1947. However, because of several items of increased revenue, the total general tax revenue of 593,439.41 required for this year will be only 51,448.53 in excess of last year. The new budget was adopted with virtually no changes as proposed by the budget committee, the members of which were Alderman George W. Urstadt, chairman, and Alderman Clifford N. Strait and Herbert N. Hicks. The council agreed to the rein- clusion in the police department appropriation the $1,075 purchase of equipment item to be used in the obtaining of a new police patrol car. This item was dropped from the original budget recommendation, but Alderman Urstadt advised its reinclusion at the meeting of the council, Dec. 29, at which he made the committee's initial report. Biggest factor of increase in virtually every department was made in connection with wages and salaries. Cost-pf-Living Boosts City officials ana department heads paid on an annual salary basis will receive a blanket cosf- of-living increase of-$240 for 1948. City employees paid at-an hourly wage rate, will receive a boost of 10 per cent over the 10 per cent that was authorized-for-last vear 1947. " - "--" However, the total increase in all appropriations resulting from this factor alone is only partially shown in the increase of the budget's grand total. This was made possible by the cutting of appropriations for'vari- ous items in several of the departments, by a surplus carry-over from 1947 of $12,249.86, and by a conservatively estimated $3,000 expected to result from the sale of city property. This property, which includes several plots of land and several unused houses, was acquired by the city when it bid for itself on them during the 1946 sale for unpaid taxes. Several items of equipment, the purchase of which was recommended by the board of health and public safety in its budget recommendations, but which were deleted by the council, were included in a special resolution adopted by the city after the end of budget deliberations. The resolution provides for the purchase of these items with funds drawn on the general reserve fund. To be purchased immediately, having already been delivered to the city, are a new street flusher and a truck for the department of public works, costing $8,600 and 53,200 respectively. Also provided for are a new traffic signal for the Main street-West avenue intersection, $1,000; SOU ieel of ciiain link fence for use at Red Jacket park, $8,505;. and a new boiler fos each of the two fire houses, $1,200. Ex-King Arrives in Switzerland I '! Former King Mihai I of Romania drives away from the railroad station at Lausanne, Switzerland, following: his arrival by special train after abdicating the throne. His mother, former Queen Helen, sits behind him. (Picture received in New York by radio from Paris) American Killed By Reds, Chinese Say TSINGTAO, China, UP)---Slaying of a U. S. Marine by Chinese Communists at a remote village in North China was reported today by the Chinese commander of the Danger Stressed In Rain Making SYRACUSE, (,-Pj --Rain-maker Vincent J. Schaefer cautioned today against uncontrolled "cloud pirating" in efforts to produce rain by seeding the clouds" with dry ice particles. Schaefer, -assigned to General Electric company's research laboratory at Schenectady, said it still was "too early' 1 to predict how his rain-rnaking formula might affect farmers of the northeastern part of the United States, Schaefer discussed the method in an address prepared for a joint session of the New York State Vegetable Growers' association and t.he Empire State Potato Club, Inc. He explained it was possible, with proper atmospheric conditions, to "sometimes start the precipitation cycle sooner than if j Thus, lie added,a specific area of i perhaps 100 square miles might, be soaked w i t h an inch of rain, which would fall elsewhere if left to natural processes. "One can easily visualize considerable trouble ahead," Schaefer observed, "if this type of 'cloud pirating' were uncontrolled." An operation t h a t "seems to hold considerable promise" is the possible elimination of destructive hail storms, Schaefer reported. He said 'tiie size oi. naiisiones couid be limited by introducing large quantities of ice nuclei at and above the freezing level in high cumulus clouds. I tim was one of five leathernecks missing on a Christmas day hunting trip. U. S. naw headauarters declined either to confirm or deny the report, made by Gen T.ing Chi-Pan at a news conference. The navy continued to withhold the identities of the five. The Chinese commander said the hunting party had been halted by sentries at government lines-beyond which U. S. personnel was forbidden to go--but that the jeep riding marines drove on to Tayu, a small village near Linshan, about 50 miles north of Tsingtao. Ting added that a marine search party went to Tayu later and was told by villagers that the slain marine had been removed by the Communists. He said it was presumed the remaining four were- taken along by the withdrawing reds. Marine headquarters in Tsingtao had reported that four marines disappeared in Communist territory on the holiday hunting trip, and that the f i f t h "was A W O L and missing in the same area. Navy authorities reported that the jeep was found--looted, wrecked and burned. (In Buffalo, N. Y., Mrs. Aglaia Kapodistria said Tuesday she had received an official message Dec. 26 that her son, Marine Pfc. Thomas Kapodistria, 19, was missing in the Tsingtao area.) Truman Inflation find Tax Plans Appear Doomed 'Other Proposals of President Expected to 'Pass 'Congress in Compromise Form WASHINGTON, /? -- Most of President Truman's major 1!)48 legislative proposals, -particularly his tax reduction and anti-inflation, plans, appeared headed today for a congressional wastebasket. But several, including rent control extension, foreign aid, broadened social security coverage, higher minimum wages and .civil rights guarantees, seemed likely to pass in compromise form. Still others, such P.S national health insurance and compulsory military training, were lumped in the "highly doubtful" category. Mr. Truman outlined the program yesterday in a 43-mmute speech to a politically minded and election-conscious congress which reacted generally along partisan lines. Republicans claimed Mr. Truman was playing politics. Democrats credited him with statesmanship. Little Doubt j But leaders of both the Repub-1 lican majority and the Democrat-' ic minority left little doubt that they look for the president's tax v ^~ and anti-inflation plans to be rejected after prolonged wrangling likely to lay the foundation for this year's presidential and con- House Session as Congress Reassembles State Anti-Red Oath Propose^ Credit Control, Parking. Among CC Suggestions Mr. Truman asked congress to give every individual- taxpayer an immediate cut of §40 for himself and each dependent and to offset the estimated 53,200, 000, 000 (billion) revenue loss by boosting corporate levies. He asked also for the inflation curb powers he was denied last month, including standby wage- price control and rationing authority. Describing his tax plan as a Methodists Approve Improvement Project, $31,200 Drive Planned Expenditure of $31,200 for the Methodist church improvement project was unanimously approved last night at a largely attended congregational meeting held in connection with the first of a series of five fellowship family night supper programs. Arthur E. Warren was named chairman of a financial campaign to be conducted in the church membership the first two weeks of February. Blueprints and estimates were prepared by Henry A. Martin, Fairport, a member of the local church and former Canandaiguan. The final figures were approved by the board of trustees and the quarterly conference of the church last week as presented by Judge Fred D. Cribb, chairman of the board. Floyd D. Butler, of the trustees' improvement survey com- mitlee, reported at last night's metting. The architect's fee was donated, according to the report. The 10-point program of repairs and remodeling is confined particularly to the church basement, but includes insulation of the attic a n d redecoration of the "chapel" on the main floor, with new furnishings to make an attractive parlor-reception room. Improvements to the basement are listed in brief, as follows: Replacement of wooden floors with concrete, covered with asphalt tile;'.covering of: large and small dining ro'nw ceilings will) ac- coustical tilt: new purl i! ions and remodeling of the Boy Scout room into three class rooms; boiler and coal storage room into three- rooms, one for the boiler; a pantry with cupboards for dishes and silver, and a Boy Scout, club and j game room; additional window lighting facilities: remodeling of platform in large dining room, and .installation of a projection screen covered w i t h doors on back wall. Also kitchen improvements and remodeling, to include new ranges, sinks, work tables and warming tables, with storage space for dishes and silver for small dinners, new dish washer, coffee urn to be placed in kitchen, all designed for the greatest efficiency; extra window lighting; double swinging doors to relieve congestion in serving and returning dishes to kitchen, and new lighting and redecoration. New and additional fixtures in two basement rest rooms: heating and plumbing changes necessitated by alterations, and painting and redecorating of basement rooms. Supper, served to about 100, was followed by a devotional sing; message, "A Faith for '48," by Dr. Ellroy D. VanDyke, Geneva district superintendent, and the congregational meeting. Chaplain Ralph G. Saxe, Veterans hospital, will be speaker at next Wednesday's fellowship supper, Ex-Consul Appointed To Post in Capitol H. Merrell Benninghoff, former US consul general at Dairen, Manchuria, left last night for Washington, where he has been appointed to serve temporarily for two months on the personnel promotion board of the State department. Mr. and Mrs. BenninKhoff returned to this country in September and have been w i t h her par- ' f-nts, Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Averill, West Lake road. With t h e i r daughter, Barbara, they returned here Sunday r.ight. from a two-week trip, spending the Christmas holidays with 'his parents, Dr. and Mrs. H. B. Benninghoff. ir.'Frank- lin, Inci., and the second week in West Virginia and Washington. Mrs. Benninghoff and Barbara expect to remain in Canandaigua for the present. "cost of living" credit to provide relief for the low income group, the president said corporations are well able to make up the revenue loss. He insisted that so long as inflation threatens, total revenues should not be reduced. Speed JOP plan The immediate Republican reaction was to speed plans for passage of the GOP hill to lop 55,600, 000,000 (billion) from the tax take by boosting personal exemptions, applying the community property principle to all states'and, .trimming all tax rates from the highest, brackets down to the lowest. Rep. Knutson (R-Minn), author of the GOP measure and chairman of the House Ways and Means committee, termed Mr. Truman's counter proposal "dead as a mack- eral." And while House Minority Leader Rayburn of Texas declared "I don't concede anything," some Democrats said they are inclined to agree xvith Knutson's view. In requesting standby rationing "prico-vago Re-establishment of the credit control plan, an off-the-street parking lot for shoppers, efficient disposal of garbage and ashes throughout the city and suppression of the "residential town" idea associated with Canandaigua' were among suggestions turned over-to the Chamber of Commerce steering committee by the board of directors at a meeting last, night. Promotion of annual activities in Canandaigua and erection of roadside signs were also included in the list of suggestions. More courtesy on the part of the police department in the tagging of out of town cars was also brought before the meeting. It was suggested that the man on the city police desk explain the city ordinance'to out of town motorists who are tagged in an attempt to make for better relations between Canandaigua and visitors. Other suggestions which have been placed in the hands of the steering committee as a guide in formulation of the 1948 program include: Securing of population figures and rates for gas, water and electricity; mapping of the trading area and poll of. the buying power and store statistics: listing of now available building sites; listing of available transportation. Tom Brown of WGVA of Geneva outlined the possibility .of weekly radio time for Canandaigua. A report from (he membership committee which met Jan. 2 revealed the addition of four new members to the chamber. Each member has also been asked to assume responsibility for securing at. least one new membership during 1948. The board also authorix.cd the 'Save What's Left' Is New GOP Slogan New Corporation * ^siA- '. '· ,, '.£-'·"; ' "·" Secretary of State l p$ls for Adequate, Prompt Eiurqpean -Recovery ^Program · _ - -- ^i · BX John M. Hightower * WASHINGTON, UP)-- Secretary of State^ Marshall appealed td' Congress 'today 'for- · an adeguate, ·· prompt and- effectively administer-.' ed European aid program' and bluntly challenged the lawmakers; "Either undertake to meet the requirements of the . problem or ' don't undertake it at alP* At the same time the 'soldier- turned-diplpmat _ rejected outright the Republican- backed; proposal to create a new '· government · corpora- - - tion t o administer t h e " ' -'WASHINGTON, (--The Republican party came up with a .1948 victory slogan today: "Vote Republican in 1948r-Save' What's Left." · In 19-16 it \vas "Hard Enough." 17 Killed, 9 Hurt in Crash Employes f .*»-"^."GA (-pj Th-^ Atlantic's · restless tides today seeped under the crumpled wreckage of a.New York to Miami charter plane in--which 17 persons, perhaps 18, died;and nine were injured. . The big converted army C-47. loaded mostly with homeward bound -Puerto Ricans, arrived over the Savannah river marshlands eight miles southeast of here yesterday morning, its twin engines firing raggedly. Lazily the plane circled, abruptly went into a headlong dive, crashed and exploded. The .crew aboard a U.S. Army engineer -boa-t,- working in the river, went to the rescue immediately, but even so it was nearly three hours before they could bring out the- injured over a tortuous mile of mud, water and grass which intervened. Shortly afterwards the U.S. coast guard cutter Aurora arrived abreast of the still smoking plane and began the grim 'task of slogging through t.he montss w i l h the dead. aid program. He called for i'singfe-" administrator. fesponslEle ; to thfe ··· president and working in" harmony:; with th» secretary of state on for-' iSeign policy questions.' '·-'·'· ·'·' "There cannot be two secretaries of state,*.MarshalfrassertetE ' .'·?'- The man whose name designates; the "MarshalJ 1 plaii" ; .:f6r"Eittopeaai recovery apepared before' the senate foreign 'relations' committee^as the firs't 'of tfiore than- a dbzSn highr officials, assigned . to present ^the Democratic ·administration's case- to the Republican- congress* for. a- four-year multjrbillipn dollar prtK · gram of'.''assistjin.ee'""'to "'"western;1 Europe. ' ' ' . - - '·-'·' Dollars Necessary .. ·:·: Of the ifeed-'fof^sWbh^aTd, Mar; shall declared: : "Dollars' .will not save- : the world--but the world to* day cannot be saved without; dol-: Wn'pt officer's briskly 5,500-word statement- for-the- written. n covers ' *"^ , Mr. Truman said the current price spiral is "undermining the living standards of millions" and "holds the threat of another depression." "High prices," he said, "must not be our only means of rationing." . attendance of Mrs. Jean Anderson Thoir.p.so;:. secretary, at a state conference of chamber secretaries in New York, Jan. 15-1". BIRTH RECORD A son, to Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Brink, Naples, Rl, in Thompson hospital, Jan. 8. 1948. Man's Body Found In Seneca Lake GENEVA, i/P--The body of Norman Betar, 55, mising since six feet of water in a Seneca lake bc'athouse. Ontario County Coroner Frank Snyder said Betar, who had said he was going fishing, apparently- slipped off the boat house platform inio'the water. By Harrj; O'Donnell ALBANY, (ffr--A . Republican legislator challenged Governor Dewey today to support a proposal designed to keep Communists, Fascists and "subversives" ouit of public service in New York by requiring a loyalty oath. Senator Fred A. Young of Low- _ _ ville introduced a proposed con- h\ite''~o$^~unpf(cedented ^ stitutional amendment and otfcer Jimerica's^eace-time history, tp!8 legislation establishing the loyalty How'and tthy he-thinks-if should oath for .public officers and em- work, 'why he considers itnece^P ployes, both state and local. sSfy and what it'ought'to cbst:*^- The civil servants would be re- He described the $6,800,000,000 quired to swear they were not which.President Truman has ask-" ; members of or sympathetic to or- ed for the first 15'months' of. the- ganizations and movements:. plan, as a precision figure which.-"Designated by the attorney "does not represent a generous-general of the United States as estimate of requirements. It is- Communistic, Fascistic or subver- not,", he -said, an "asking'figured" based on expected, cuts-by Cpti* gress. ' : " . ' · · ' " . ' ' · · ' Aid in the full, amount, Marshall declared, 1 is required :: "to .initiate- a program of genuine recovery'anil' to take both Europe and tbT tion out of the blind'alley of continuing' relief." ' · ' · · · '-'.-· As for the' whole undertaking, the secretary reiterated earlier estimates that'the cost might range between $15,100,000,000 and SIX'-' 800,000,000. But he said, "the overall cost is not capable of precise determination so far in --'""*»·»·'* Search Ruins of Bombed Jerusalem Hotel Leaving for Federal Position on Guam Barton J. Williams, 25 Gorham street, will leave tomorrow on the first leg of a journey to the Island of Guam, where he has taken a position with the US War department. Since April, 1938, Mr. Wil- Jiams has been a clerk with {he Veterans Administration hospital. His new work is in the nature of a promotion. On arrival in San Francisco, he will take a two-week training course for his new work before flying to Guam. TREASURY REPORT WASHINGTON, tiPt--The position of the treasury Jan. 6: Receipts, $188,874,111.18: expenditures, $234,208,311.08; balance, $2,389,202,798.62; total debt, $256,435, 535,183.93; decrease under vious day. HjfiO.318.712.51, Rescuri workers dig in the ruins of « section of the Semiramis Hotel in Jerusalem for victims after it had been, wrecked hy a terrific explosion. Responsibility for tiie attack was taken By Hagan*, Jewish defense force which claimed the hotel was being used as headquarters for an armed Arab force. A 28-year-old Arab woman, trapped in Win ruins, wai taken out Srt b*nw later. (AP photo via radio from Cairo to Now York) Seeking to alter the form of federal or state government by "unconstitutional means." -. Would Cover Laborers Executive and" judicial officials and legislators would be required to take the oath "before they enter upon their duties." Failure of employes, including laborers,' to take the oath would "terminate" their employment. The Lowville legislator said he had not consulted administration leaders before introducing the measures, but added: "The governor does not like Communists. If he's consistent he should support this program. "If it's good for Washington, it should be good here." Reliable sources indicated, how- over, Dewey probably would not urge enactment of the legislation because of difficulty in defining by statue what constitutes a subversive person or sympathizer. Young said the oath, if adopted, would apply lo present officers and employes as well as rfiose seeking to enter public service. There have been no accusations made against state employes, however, questioning their" loyalty to the nation. 221 Proposals Two administration measures were among 221 proposals droppec into the hopper on opening day compared to 170 last year. They would: Eliminate the requirement tha otherwise qualified applicants for the stale veterans' bonus must be living in New York at the time of application. (This is a proposec constitutional amendment tha' could not become effective for a least two years if approved by the 1948 legislature.) Extend until March 31, 1949, the state program to finance temporary housing for veterans as well as emergency housing and classroom facilities at colleges, chiefly to accommodate ex-servicemen. The bill carried no appropriation. The 1947 legislature appropriated 830,000,000, boosting .to S69,800,000 total expenditures for this program since 1945. The bonus amendment was introduced by Senator Charles O. Burney, Buffalo Republican, and the emergency housing extension by Senator JWacNeJl Mitchell, New- York City Republican. Other bill -would: Fix minimum payments of 575 per pupil in state aid for education to school districts. (Senator Pliny Williamson, R-Westchestcr). TWINS TWO DAVS APART NEEDMORE, W. Va., UP)--Twin boys were bom two days apart to Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Parker. The first boy put in his appearance Sunday, the second arrived Tuesday. They were even delivered by different doctors. Adequate and Prompt "Three principled," Marshall sagl, 'should determine the amount tinting of our aid. It.nrtist'be _,,, quate. It must be prompt. It must be effectively applied." -f-gj- On the question of providirtg sufficient funds to do the job*"ro told the lawmakers that the first appropriation should be enough te get' the program under way "on a broad, sound basis"aind not Iii'S piecem'eal manner." "f "An ' inadequate. program," h« added, "would involve -a wastage" of our resources with an ineffee»' tive result. Either undertake to meet the'requirements of the prob* lem pr don't undertake it at afli* On the question Of ; time, Marshall-said, "the sooner this pto gram can get under way the greater its chances of success, x 'x x. Unless the. program can be placecFin operation on or sdbn after ATISJJL first, there wUL undpubtedlyHSfcTI serious deterioration hr' : some of the basic conditions tipon ; which the whole project is ·predicated.' 7 iineasy' Half-Peace In connection 1 SflftlTtfte' problem of cost, Marshall gave this reply to .Whether the'- American people can .bear the costs and"make the "sacrifice" 'He considers necessafjr to success: "A wjjrld of continuing uneasy -half-peace will create'.demands for cpn$taiiUy mo.unting expenditures for defense. This program should be viewed as an investment. fn peace". In those ternis,' the cost ?s "investment in peace'' lOW." The shc-uld pay out, Marshall said, by enabling Europeans to - restore their war ravaged economics "against the avowed determination of the Soviet unom and the CM- munist party to oppose and sa- otage" the recovery program "at every turn." He piclur-efl the alternative trj economic recovery as a.' western European collapse in which "the historic base of u-e.stern" civilization x x x" will take on' il new form in -the image of the tyranny -that we fought to destroy' in Ctei- many." , ; fc "Our national security will be seriously threatened," he said. "W* shall live in effect in an ---····=" :amp, regulated and controlled.* A fresh demonilratiott of th« cabinet officer's personal poularUy with the lawmakers preceded ht* pstimony. :". J*£ ; 1L

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