The Daily Inter Lake from Kalispell, Montana on November 13, 1957 · Page 6
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The Daily Inter Lake from Kalispell, Montana · Page 6

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Kalispell, Montana
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Wednesday, November 13, 1957
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Page 6
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Mrs. Belmont Devotes Life To Causes Instead of Society BY GAY PAULEY NEW YORK (UP) -- Mrs. August Belmont owned the wherewithal Lo become a hostess with Hie mostest, liad she wished. Instead, one of (he Inst of the grancle clamus of liigli society chose to devote her life to causes. Now in her 70's, she still is busy | young matron her greatest dif- \vith them, has found time to ficulty was housekeeping. "I was write her memoirs, but is far more I transplanted from a little house interested in planning the future which mother and I owned and Brevities lhan reminiscing about the past. -6 THE INTER LAKE, Wednesday, November 13, 1957 operated with one do-all maid to "I never was a great party- houses here and there," she said, giver, nor a great party-goer," "Here and there" included homes., she said in an interview in her! on Long Island, in Kentucky, at Social Calendar WEDNESDAY Past Noble Grands, IOOF Temple, Dessert, 7:15 p.m. Meeting, 8 p.m. "VVhitefish Newcomers. Mrs. Ordway Persyn, 40o Columbia, 8 p.m. Cyrenc Commaiidei'.v. KT, Masonic Temple. 3 p.m. Work in Hed Cross and Malta; lunch. Flathead Callers League, Hellman home, 8 p.m. Army Reserve AVives and Mothers Club, special meeting, Mrs. William Witts, Corner of Willow and Spruce Drives. Evergreen, 8 p.m. For rides call SKG-757G or SK2-9036. Arts and Crafts Department, Century Club, Mrs. Leo Evans, 1505 Fifth Ave. East, 8 p.m. Jaycecns, The Hacienda, 7 p.m. THURSDAY Women's Missionary, Bethel Baptist Church, basement, 2 p.m. Christian Women's Fellowship, Central Christian Church, church, 1:30 p.m. ....8 et 40, Mrs. Earl Scovel, 8 p.m. Whitefisli American Legion Auxiliary. Mrs. R. R. Haake. Past Presidents Guild, Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Mrs. J. J. Edmiston, 535 Fifth Ave. East, 1:30 p.m. Trinity Lodge, AFAM, Masonic Temple, 8 p.m. Lunch. Koyal Neighbors of America, TOOF Temple, 8 p.m. Balloting; entertainment. Flathead Folk Dancers, Russell School gymnasium, 8:30 p.m. Nazarene Foreign Missionary Society, Mrs. C. S. Howard, 526 Second Ave. West, 2 p.m. Murmuring Pines, Mrs. Dick Baldwin, Coram, 8 p.m. Brotherhood, Bethlehem Lutheran Church, church basement, 6:45 dinner meeting. To hear Dr. Lelv Aalen of Norway speak, cliurch, 8 p.m. . · FRIDAY Modern Trends in Money Management for the Family, Mrs. Naomi Lory, MSU home economics department, home economics room, FCHS, 8 p.m. Open to all homemakers. Drama .and Arts Department, Century Club, Mrs. Adrian,Adams, 520 Sixth Ave. East, 2 p:m. Crescent Rebekah Lodge, 8 p.m. First nomination of officers, refreshments. . ' Pine Tree Circle, Mrs. Mary Behrman, 437 Second Ave. East, 1:30 p.m. , SATURDAY Make It With Wool luncheon, Temple Tea Room, 1 p.m. Style show, 2 p.m. Open' to public. Luncheon reservations call Flathead Extension office. Evergreen Balance and Swing Dance Club, 8 p.m. Guests welcome; bring sandwiches. spacious Fifth Avenue apartment overlooking Central Park. Saratoga, N. Y., in South. Carolina, New York and Newport. Mrs. Belmont, a handsome gray- "I was a wanderer from another haired woman with light blue eyes planet," she wrote. But she also! and a lively sense of humor, was said "a private railroad car is not an actress of considerable note an acquired taste; one takes to it when a shipboard meeting led to ( immediately." marriage into the socially-prom-| Today, she lives in comparative inent banking family. She was a'modesty, wintering at the apart- contemporary of one of the four m e n t j n New York and spending hundred's most famous hostesses summers in "a little cottage with -- the late-Mrs. Cornelius Vantler- a g j an t view" in Northeast Har- Jr. f END OF ERA | live in breeding Her book, "The Fabric of Mem- 1 thoroughbreds -- ory is chock-full of names and per-'her husband's family. ! bor, Maine. She no longer is ac- ancl racing the Belmont (Farrar, Straus and Cudahy)| Track in New York is named for sonal sidelights on the famous of i three generations -- King George, "I christened Man O'War, the greatest of them all," she recalled. Will Rogers, Richard Harding "1 loved the horses just as dearly Davis, Caruso, George Bernard as my husband." Shaw, to name a few. Shaw wrote Why had she not re-married? . "Major Barbara" especially for her, but she never played the role, much to his irritation. Talking with this reporter, MI'S. Belmont observed that the death of Mrs. Vanderbilt a few years j ago marked the end of an era -the passing of the "old-fashioned i society leader." But she seemed Mrs. Belmont smiled and answered, "1 never had time." Then, after a pause, she added, "I am sort of a loyal soul." to have no regret. "Society leaders. AAsBT.S EUREKA (ILNS) -- Mrs. Anita Gihnond, oracle, presided at a Where are meeting of Royal Neighbors ot they now?", she said. "Who owns 'America last week at Masonic a place big enough for 300 house Temple. She announced that the guests? Now, entertaining is a sewing circle would meet Nov. 15 club or hotel. The circumstances at the home of Mrs. Phoebe Green R. W. Nolan left for his home in Missoula Monday afternoon aft- er'a weekend visit with his brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. M.' H. Nolan. ; Mrs. C. O. Miller was a weekend guest in Missoula of her broth- 'er-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. A. L? Ainswortli. Miller and son, Robert, Dr; F. H. Keller and T. C. Harmon were hunting iu the Lake Placid area over the weekend. Election of Officers Highlights WMF Meet Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Powell spent the weekend in Spokane. Oscar Overcash visited in Kalispell with his wife's parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Larson. He was en route from San Diego to Cut Bank on a business trip. Mrs. C. N. Livdahl left Kalispell Friday to return to her home in Arcata, Calif., after a two-week visit with her son and family, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Livdahl. don't provide for the same leadership." She said Mrs. Vanderbilt made entertaining a "career." ". . .occasionally people accused her of over-emphasis on royalty and at 2 p.m. The oracle served refreshments after the meeting. Ideal costume for a mature autumn bride would be a silver lace sheath worn with matching jacket titles," Mrs. Belmont writes, "but collared - m mink or chinchilla. . . '. she was loyal to old friends;'oSSSi even when their fortunes changed for the worse." As for Mrs. Belmont, she confessed more interest in work and! in "being interested in my husband's interests" than in social doings. She has been active since 1917 in the American Red Cross; in its nursing committee; helped establish what is now the Community Service Society; was the first woman elected to the board of directors of the Metropolitan Opera '.Assn.; founded the Opera Guild in 1935 to further the cause of opera nationally; and has backed numerous other social and philanthropic projects. There, were no big /headlines about a ."Cinderella-bride" when · in 1910 actress Eleanor Robson married August Belmont, a fidow- er with three sons. "Oh, it was startling enough at that time for an actress' to marry society," she said in-the interview. ; "But we hadn't gone around talking about our "engagement . . . although the immediate family knew of it for a long, time-and accepted me with all kindness. .1 closed in a play in Brooklyn one day. We married the next." There were no chil-j dren of this marriage. Belmont died in 1924. CHRISTENED MAN O'WAR i Mrs. Behnont said that as a ' MUST BE A RECORD--These six children ot Mrs. Byron Levlon* center, must ho!d some kind ot a record. They were all born in the same Houston. Tex., hospital, tn the same room, with the same doctor and nurse in attendance. Melanie, on Mrs. Levloo's lap, is one week old. The oldest is Teena. 10. at right The FL?V. E. V. Swinehart, pastor of Church of God, left last Sunday to attend an interdomina- tional regional conference on Town and Country Evangelism in Billings. He plans to return to Kalispell Friday. Mr. and Mrs. Maurice D. White of Billtngs are the parents of a daughter born Saturday. Mrs. White is the former Helen Hunt. Grandparents are Mrs. James White anil Mr. and Mrs. Howard J. Hunt. Mrs. Hunt left Sunday to be with her daugheer and family. Two Honored At Dinner SOMERS (ILNS) -- Mrs. Ho-'for Mr. and Mrs. Robert Gestring bert Gestring and Mrs.' Frank and Kocky Webster of Kalispell, Cayerly were honored Jointly at aj M r s _ E]izabeth Gestrin g of DeV on, birthday dinner party last Thurs- . . _ . . ,, ,, , ,, The election of officers for 1958 highlighted a meeting of Women's Missionary Federation of- Bethlehem Lutheran Church last Thursday. New officers are Mrs. Al Tronstad, president; and Mrs. Norman Stedje, vice president. Elected to serve another term were Mrs. Oscar Moe, secretary; and Mrs. Paul Johnson, treasurer. Installation will be at the next meeting. Mi's. Hans Mebust, president, appointed Mrs. Howard Poston and Mrs. James Terry on the auditing committee and named Mrs. E. W. Iverson, Mrs. Byron O'Neil and Mrs. Hjordis Bratsberg to work with the staff members at Immanuel Lutheran Home to provide | entertainments, rides and other services for home residents. The president announced the seminary choir program, sponsored by the senior choir, would be Jan. 7 and that members of Bethlehem WMJ? would provide the program Thursday for Calvary WMF in Evergreen. She said that ' the clothing drive for overseas relief would continue through Dec. 1. Articles for shipment are to be left at the church. Mrs. Ed Rose led in a devotional program. Mrs. George Fitch, program chairman, introduced Mrs. George Mow who sang "One World." She was accompanied by Mrs. Robert Happ. The Rev. Gerald "White moderated a panel discussion on "Differences in Christian Education." Two alumna of St. Olaf, Mrs. Hans Lenschow spoke on the scholastic phase and Mrs. Arnold i Stedje-told of the financial status of the school. Mrs. Sterling Rygg, i a graduate of Concordia College, ] spoke on the social phase. . Members of Circle 5 served rt- freshments. Mrs. Lloyd Hanson presided at the birthday table. A Thanksgiving motif was selected for table decorations. day evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kelso. ; Places at the table were laid ANNUAL LUTERSK DINNER * . » ' , . ' . Thursday, November 21 Bethlehem Lutheran Church Sponsored by Brotherhood A Brotherhood Project Serving Time: 4:30 P.M. Until Al! Are Served · · ' · · : , , -- MENU- -- . , . : ; Lutefisk ; . ' \ ( Drawn B u t t e r Norwegian Meat Balls Cabbage Slaw Lefse . Potatoes Jelly and Pickles Bread Ice Cream -- Wafers Coffee Sale at Conrad National Bank First National Bank Main Street Furnitur* Morrle Ekslrand Marshall-Wells Store Sledje Brother* Xoro Buick Oicar'g -Barber Shop Ludwlg Agency Bobbin Robbin Dr. E. O. Bratsberg ADULTS $1.50 Oscar Engebreiion Johnson Funeral Home Torberl's Manley's Barber Shop Coca Cola Boiling Co. Henricksen Motor Co. Saverud Paint Shop Modern Equipment' Co, Western Woodcraft Co. Hoy Johnson (TV Center) Mylcs Johns (Devonshire Molel) Rica at Equity CHILDREN 75c Mrs. Bart Guanella and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Caverly. Gifts were presented. Dr. Lloyd Halvorson of Washington, D. C., was a visitor in Kalispell en. route to Corvallis, Ore., where he is taking part in a 'program at Oregon State College. While here he was a guest at the home of his brother and family, Mr. and Mrs. S. N. Halvorson. Halvorson and Dr. Halvorson were in Relatives Visit The DeVoes * SOMERS (ILNS) -- Guests of Mr. and Mrs. Charles DeVoe over the Armistice Day weekend included Mr. and Mrs. Chris Johansen and three daughters, Marilyn, Donna and Sandy, and DeVoe's grandson, Larry Gutchell of Great Falls. Mrs. Johansen is Mrs. Dt- Voe's niece. Mr. and Mi's. David Harriman and two daughters of St. Ignatius visited with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Drew Tuesday and Wednesday. Mr. and Mrs. John White and family have moved into their new jhome on the lake south of Somers ;recently purchased from Mrs. Viola Cole. Mr. and Mrs. Sid Strong and son have moved into the school addition house vacated by the White family. .Spokana Saturday for the UCLA- WSC football game and we're joined there by another brother, Dr. Alfred Halvorson, faculty member at Washington State College, and S. N. Halvorson's son, Wayne, student at WSC in Pullman. Teenagers . . . . REQUEST PROGRAM Broadcast Every Saturday afternoon 1 to S by KOFI Radio from FERGUSSON'S SHOES GIVE THE GIFT OF ELEGANCE Schiaparelli Stockings These extra fine. Paris-inspired fashionable nylons e'x- ,i quisitely gift packaged for Christmas in Schiaparelli's - Shocking Pink lace -- designed satin accessory case . . . a double" gift given in wonderfully good taste -- fit for a queen. 3 pr. hose in smart-Accessory Case 5.85 Nylon Dip I especially created to wash and protect your fine syn- i thetic sweaters, hosiery and lingerie. 89c KALISPELL MERCANTILE COMPANY ·MlK J M-'-f-'V.-'M.:·.'yfA-K^^fffJ.-A-ff.-fJV^.-t.V^iV.fA -'r, PRE-HOUDAY SPECIAL - W I D E o SAVINGS 10% · EXCEPT PENDLETON - COMFY ITEMS - FAIR TRADED · , Mens Wear^Womens Wear*Dry Goods THURSDAY-FRIDAY-SATURDAY NOV. 14 NOV. 15 NOV. 16 This is your special opportunity to buy anything you want from any department in the store at a savings of ten per cent. Three ways to buy -- Lay-Away . . . Budget with privileges . . . Charge Account. WE INVITE YOUR CHARGE ACCOUNT - NO INTEREST CHARGES EXTRA SPECIALS SAVE TO Special Table Draperies 50% Short Lengths Full Bolts , Yds. Yds. - NOW and 1.59 Wool Skirts Car Coats 1 Table Men's Wool Shirts Sweaters · PRICE SPECIAL · Dresses 1 RACK J»UV 1 RACK O.UU 11.00 Values to $34.95 MEN'S Casual, Outing Sport Coats *8-nai5 Broken Sizes -- Real Values 1 TABLE · Men's Shirts Dress and Knit Now Values to $4.95 Men's Hamilton Park HATS Now Smart Styles and Colors CLOSE OUT Values to $15.00 MEN'S Suits, Topcoats $ 53 Kuppenheimer -- Griffon Values to $95.00 MEN'S · Jarman Shoes Now $ 5to $ 8 Small Sizes, 7 to 8J£ Values to $18.95 219 Main Street , Phone SK 6-3325 BBU

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