The Springfield News-Leader from Springfield, Missouri on October 29, 2006 · Page 14
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The Springfield News-Leader from Springfield, Missouri · Page 14

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Sunday, October 29, 2006
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2B October 29, 2006 Sunday News-Leader News-Leader.com Support amendment, ministers say The group of black clergy argue that stem cell research w ould help their communities. By Andale Gross THt ASSOCIATED PRESS Kansas City A group of black ministers who support a proposed state constitutional amendment to protect stem cell research say it could save lives in the black community. The 20 clergy from Kansas City and St. Louis held a news conference Friday at Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church to get their message out. "Stem cells could provide cures for currently incurable diseases," said the Rev. Wal Couple donates funds for memorial sculpture THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Jefferson city Lewis and Clark's epic expedition through the American West will have a lasting monument, after a couple donated the final $66,000 needed to fund the project. Bryan and Sharon Pope recently gave the money to the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Task Force in Jefferson City as the final installment in the $390,000 needed for bronze figures of Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and expedition members George Drouillard; York, Clark's servant; and Seaman, Lewis' dog. The 5,000-pounds of sculpted bronze will be installed near the Missouri Capitol facing the Missouri River. The monument, which is being assembled in Norman, Okla., will be installed when the Katy Trail-head Park is completed. Pope, a Jefferson City dentist, and his wife had already donated $10,000 to the effort. Last week's larger donation pushes the fundraising effort "over the top," said Jefferson City Parks and Recreation Director Bill Lockwood. Bryan Pope said the donations were a way to repay task force members for organizing bicentennial events celebrating the famous 1804-06 expedition. "We did it because it's been a great three years, and frankly, we are going to miss all of those events," Pope said. "But the best part is to get our monument in Jefferson City and have it here always." Sabra Tull Meyer, a Columbia sculptor who made the statues, wiD return to Oklahoma to finalize detail work on the figures, which will be in storage until the park construction is completed. Vice president THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WHiitMAN air Force Base Vice President Dick Cheney told several thousand troops at Whiteman Air Force Base on Friday that the United States would prevail in the war on terror. "America's cause is just. Paid Advertisement Missing Springfield If you are missing teeth and want to know the real truth your dentist won't tell you about, get your free copy of the report "Dentures Vs. Implants! The Hidden Dangers And Real Truths You Must Know That NO Dentist Is Willing To Tell You!" "If you want more comfortable, better fitting teeth you need to read lace Hartsfield of Metropolitan Missionary Baptist, "including diseases that disproportionately affect African-Americans, like diabetes, sickle cell disease and cancer." He said blacks make up 14 percent of Missourians diagnosed with diabetes. Meanwhile, one in 400 black babies is diagnosed with sickle cell disease, the pastor said. "We cannot let our people suffer," Hartsfield said. "We need to protect lifesaving cures in Missouri." 6 94ft mm Know something about this photo? If you do, please contact the History Museum for Springfield-Greene County at 864-1976, or send a message at the museum's Web site, www.springfieldhistorymuseum.org. Aldermen seek execution moratorium By Cheryl Wittenauer THE ASSOCIATED PRESS St. Louis The St. Louis Board of Aldermen asked Missouri legislators on Friday to consider a moratorium on executions in the state. The resolution, passed unanimously, asks state lawmakers to reconsider a failed House bill from last session that would have imposed a moratorium until 2010 while a commission studied the state's death penalty and made recommendations. House Bill 1496, introduced by state Rep. Bill Deeken, R-Jefferson City, had 26 co-sponsors but never made it out of a House committee. St. Louis Alderman Terry Kennedy, who sponsored the resolution, said problems with the death penalty system are enough to warrant a tempo praises troops, awards medal during visit America's cause is right, and with you in the fight we will prevail," Cheney said. "The war on terror is a battle for the future of civilization," he said. "It's a battle we're fighting. It's a battle we'll win." He praised Whiteman's role teeth? this important document today," our sources say. To get your free copy of this important report full of revealing secrets that your dentist won't tell you can call anytime! It's a free call and the report is also FREE, too! To get your free copy, and this insider information, you must call Toll Free 1-800-247-6302 and request report 3003 or, for your urgent ques- tions call 417-883-9333 to 1 The ministers said the proposed Amendment 2 would give Missourians access to research and treatments that others already are afforded. The Rev. Wendell Edwards Jr., who has sickle cell disease, said he has endured pain associated with the blood disorder since he was a young boy. He said he hopes stem cell research will lead to a cure. "It's not about cloning; it's about cures," said Edwards, pastor at St. John Christian Methodist Episcopal Church in Richmond. Amendment 2, while banning the cloning of humans, allows an embryonic cloning RESTORING "7T 3M, ..'ggS rary or permanent moratorium. His resolution had 13 co-sponsors and was unopposed. According to the Moratorium Now campaign, St. Louis is the 150th U.S. city to take such action. Illinois and New Jersey currently have moratoriums. California and North Carolina are studying the death penalty-Kennedy said various groups and individuals have urged him and other city officials to "do what we could at the local level." The resolution cited a federal judge's rulings this year that Missouri's death penalty procedures were unconstitutional. U.S. District Judge Fernando Gaitan Jr. has said Missouri's death penalty protocol, which uses a three-drug lethal injection, could subject con- in the war, noting that B-2 bombers departed on missions from the western Missouri base weeks after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. "You've written a new and proud chapter in American military history. We depend on you. You always get the job PWSIMW filial) (!fMtp ML Ir.iA - ;vw Z 1 Is JUST f- : . i it..-. Quality the Competition Can ft Offer At Going Out of Business Prices! Factory Warranty Delivery & Tuning! technique that opponents contend destroys early human life. "We know Amendment 2 is the right thing for Missouri," said the Rev. Emanuel Cleaver III, pastor at Centennial United Methodist Church in Kansas City. "Amendment 2 is all about cures nothing more, nothing less." The ballot proposal would change the Missouri Constitution to guarantee the use of any federally allowed stem cell research and treatments a move supporters say will stop legislative attempts to ban the research. "Unfortunately, there are HISTORY FROM THE COLLECTION OF THE HISTORY MUSEUM FOR SPRINGFIELD-GREENE COUNTY Phelps School Orchestra, 1922 The History Museum has no date for this photo or any information on any of the orchestra members shown in the photograph. demned prisoners to cruel and unusual punishment. The rulings effectively have halted executions in Missouri. For the last year, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Jennifer Joyce has been reviewing the case of Larry Griffin, executed in 1995, after a study by a Michigan professor raised doubts about Griffin's guilt in a 1980 drive-by murder. Her office said Friday the case is j p.. Nixon still under review, made more difficult by the amount of time that has passed since the murder. Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, said the St. Louis aldermen's resolution is significant in a state done, on target and on time." After speaking for about 20 minutes, Cheney awarded a Bronze Star to Master Sgt. Mike Morin of the 509th Security Forces. Morin lobbied for recording equipment to capture conversations between visitors and 7j nj IPTlIH3 n:. ir c iuuSiiiiiiir 111111111120 Grands, Uprights, Players, Digitals, Keyboards, Lamps, Accessories . , some politicians in Jefferson City who have repeatedly tried to outlaw some of these promising forms of research," said the Rev. B.T. Rice, pastor of New Horizon Seventh Day Adventist Church in St Louis. "That's why we need Amendment 2." The ministers said they plan to express their views on the measure from their pulpits during worship services. Hartsfield said the pastors have a responsibility to their congregations to do so. The amendment is more of a "people issue" than a political one, Rice added. Opponents say they aren't against research on adult stem i r like Missouri, which ranks fourth among the states in the number of executions since 1976. "There's a greater skepticism in the country right now," Dieter said. "Things are being exposed about wrongful convictions, maybe even wrongful executions." Asked about the prospect of a moratorium, Attorney Gen- eral Jay Nixon said through a spokesman Friday that capital punishment in Missouri is sought, imposed and carried out sparingly and that the process has significant safeguards in the courts. He said he believes Missouri juries should be able to recommend the death penalty for certain murders and that Missourians believe it should be an option under the appropriate set of facts. to Whiteman detainees at Camp Bucca in Iraq. He also was credited with quelling a riot at the detention facility and crafting a plan that allowed 200 detainees to participate in the October 2005 referendum. Morin plans to retire in June 2007. fAv common reanv caret 1 l....t Jjo . vsu '''AZllin" 1 "Mfi&ff cells, but they contend embryonic stem cell research is unethical and unsafe. "For me, protecting life in all of its stages, even from the very beginning, is a critical moral issue," said the Rev. Dennis Dewey, who opposes Amendment 2 and is pastor at Hope Fellowship Church in Kansas City. "Certainly, from a Christian perspective, we're very interested in healing and helping people be relieved from suffering," Dewey said. "I'm very supportive of adult stem cell research. I think it has shown promise, and there's more that can be done." Jury to be selected in trial for 2003 slaying NEWS-LEADER STAFF Jury selection will begin Monday in Taney County for the the second-degree murder trial of a Christian County man accused of shooting his roommate dead in 2003. Robert W. Case, 44, is accused of killing Thomas Blair, 48, with a 20-gauge shotgun following an argument at their rental home on Hickman Lane, east of Bruner. Case, also charged with armed criminal action, has claimed self-defense in the Dec. 3, 2003, death. Monday marks the start of Case's second trial. A mistrial was declared on Jan. 10 after a jury could not reach a verdict. Blair had been renting the home for about a year before Case moved in with him. Case called 911 about 12:40 a.m. Dec. 3 to report the shooting. "He said he'd just shot his roommate and that he was sorry," Christian County Prosecutor Ron Cleek said at the time of the filing of charges. Sheriff's deputies found Blair in a southeast room of the home. He had been shot in the right side of the face. A shotgun and spent shell casing were also found. If he's found guilty, Case could serve up to a life sentence. Lottery PICK 3 9-4-7 (midday) 5-8-6 (evening) PICK 4 9-8-9-9 (midday) 4-8-6-1 (evening) SHOW-ME 5 4-9-15-31-33 (midday) 12-15-29-37-43 (evening) LOTTO 3-18-28-33-38-43 P0WERBALL 14-22-30-38-41-12 Correction policy The News-Leader strives for accuracy and fairness. We will correct any errors or misunderstandings created by stories, headlines or photographs. Readers may request a correction by calling 836-1199. v. ! -.;ouri Institute f ' fM-"'a' Health www.sshssprinnfield.orq

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