The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on July 28, 1966 · Page 14
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 14

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, July 28, 1966
Page:
Page 14
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f«ge TourUrt -Blythevfll* (Arfc.) Courlef Kew» - Thuraihy, July «. 19M Man's Worst Enemy to Help (n Vietnam IT'S BUGGED, all right A U.S. Army specialist tests (he Whole Insect Personnel Detector, which houses a bedbug whose job is to sniff out the enemy. By ROBERT COCHNAR Newspaper Enterprise Assn. WASHINGTON - (NBA) A whole new career in service to his country may be open to the lowly bedbug, thanks to the U. S. Army. Army scientists have been working with these unfriendly insects and have discovered they can tell when human beings are in their neighborhood. But let the Army describe its newest weapon: "The apparatus is an experimental device known as a Whole Insect Personnel Detector. Inside an accordionlike instrument is a small, wire container housing four to six bedbugs hungry for human blood. "As the walking soldier works the accordion in and out he fills the chamber wifii air, thus exposing the bugs to the atmosphere of the vicinity. If a human is near, the bugs will sense the effluents and react vigorously. "An electronic pickup attached to the bug cage is connected to an amplifier at the waist of the soldier which produces an audible signal in the earphones when the normally quiescent bugs sense the human effluents." Scientists figure soldiers in Viet Nam should be able to use the bugs to detect Viet Cong guerrillas. How the bedbug will be able to tell the enemy from the friend is another matter. Finding Viet Cong has always been difficult, but one wonders whether a squad of American soldiers will be willing to stake its collective life on the ability of a couple of bedbugs. On the other hand, this discovery offers tremendous possibilities for other little creatures hitherto considered to be of no parlicuar military value. The grasshopper, for example. Scientists might figure out a way to alter the pitch of the rasping sound the grasshopper makes when it rubs its legs together. Placed in the hands of friendly troops, the grasshopper .might emit sounds recognizable by other friendlies. Sort of like a radio set, but lighter. And what about the bat? This airborne sonar system — is uses high-pitched squeaks to tell where it's going at night — might be adapted for military use. A long string, say, could be attached to a bat leg. The other end coud be placed on a reel which would be held by a soldier. The soldier simply unwinds the bat at night and follows It. But knowing the craftiness of Viet Cong, it is conceivable they may invent devices to neutralize the Army's front-line bat and bug defenses. Take the Whole Insect Personnel Detector. Some clever Viet Cong will, no doubt, dis- A STUDY IN CONTRASTS marks Pat Nugent's We in the weeks before he rates a salute during a helicopter arrival on the White House lawn af a being greeted by Secretary of State Rusk, and Luci, right He gets a hand of a different kind, right, on kitchen police duty during a training stint with the Air National Guard at Travis Field. Ga. cover that bedbugs become sleepy when exposed to honeysuckle or dandelion wine, or something. This shouldn't alarm the scientific - military establishment. The bedbug, after all, might well become as important a scout and sentry as members of the K-9 Corps were during World War II. , Hand - picked soldiers might {take courses in training and handling hand - picked teams of bedugs at the U. S. Army School of Entomology. The bugs, at the same time, would have to go through courses in obedience and military discipine. Old habits will have to be eliminated. It would hardly do for disgruntled, malignering bedbugs to revert to type by burrowing into beds at a ,time when they are supposed to be finding Viet Cong. And, of course, DDT would have to be used with discretion. Remember Pay Your Paper Boy NEWS BRIEFS MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — Some time in early August the battleship Alabama will'welcome its 600,000th visitor since it opened to the public Jan. 9, 1965. ' The World War II ship has! averaged more than 30,000 visi-1 tors a month. The ship's log shows visitors from all the states and 20 foreign countries. BOSTON (AP) — Joseph L. Aims of St. Louis, Mo., has been elected secretary-treasurer of the 300,000-member American Federation of State, County and I Municipal Employes, AFL-CIO; BLYTHEYILLE STORES OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS UNTIL 8 P.M. Retail Merchants Association Have Chosen Friday NI§ht in Place of Thursday Night in Order to Provide Shopping Convenience for More People in This Area. Shop In Biytheville Tomorrow Night & Every Friday til S p.m. THIS AD SPONSORED BY THE EOLLOWING: STERLING KRESS R. D. HUGHES CO. MEAD'S CLOTHING MARTINS MEN'S STORE OKLAHOMA TIRE & SUPLY CO. HUBBARD & HOKE FURNITURE CO. GRABER'S JIEDEL'S WADE FURNITURE CO. HALSELL & WHITE FURNITURE CO. 1 JIMMIE EDWARDS FURNITURE CO. I WESTBROOKS FAMILY SHOE STORE JACK'S SHOES PAUL'S BOOTERY HEUER'S SHOE STORE

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