The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 12, 1967 · Page 7
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 7

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, December 12, 1967
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Page 7
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Kytbtvite (Ark.) Courier N«wi - TutEfcy, Dewnbtf 13, 1967- Vtyt S*VM BOSSMAN BRUCE McLAREN chats with employe Denny Hulme before a rich Can- Am race. McLaren cars won upwards o£ $100.000 in the six-race series, McLaren Racers Pay Off By BOB COCHNAR NBA Automotive Editor NEW YORK - (NEA) - He is young and he looks eager, interested, alert. In a business suit, he could be a successful (should I say it? newspaper- sons for our successes> ,, says , explainSi "depends very much Bruce McLaren happens to be a business executive who believes in his product to such an extent that he regularly trusts, it with his, life. McLaren, a 29- year-old New Zealander, builds and drives racing cars. And he has had a fair amount ef success. With teammate and fellow New Zealander Denny Hume, McLaren dominated the popular Canadian - American Challenge Cup series this year. Like, they won five of the six races — in McLaren Group 7 cars. Bruce was in town the-other day — enroute from Hawaii to England — fairly bubbling with plans and ideas for next season. Having sold his victorious No. 4 car to Roger Penske, wealthy Philadelphia sportsman and former driver, he's building a new car for 1968. "Why sell a winner?" he repeated my question. "Well, this year's winner is not necessarily next year's winner. Besides, in the last couple of races Jim Hall was pushing me hard in his Chaparral and I don't want that to happen next year." McLaren, speaking for his col-1 on the success of the drivers — leagues past, present and future, "is the Tasman series which is supported by New Zealand automobile clubs as well as a lot of spectators. "There's money to be won and the best drivers are sent to Europe for experience on the circuits. We have a pretty good record, I guess." None of the aforementioned Aussics and Kiwis lives Down Under any more, however. "It's a bit far away, don't you think" asks McLaren. Building and selling racing cars, McLaren freely admits, is not exactly the world's most lucrative occupation. The mar- and that means Denny and me. We've had a good year, so we expect to sell srca. What happens if we have a not-so-good year? I prefer not to contemplate that." What he would really like, after ,he establishes a string of victories for McLaren racing cars, is to work out "some kind of arrangement'" with a major manufacturer. "Good old Carroll Shelby," he muse s. "What a nice situation. Look at all those Shelby Mustangs. Wouldn't it be nice to have a McLaren Triumph or a McLaren Camaro or a McLaren Whatnot?" ket, all things considered, is | Meanwhile, Bruce McLaren minute. If he sells a dozen cars Motor Racing Ltd. must stay next year, he'll be almost satis- solvent. And to do that, Bruce fied. McLaren must win races. It "The success of my cavs in should be a very interesting the marketpace," he frankly I season. News Briefs DURHAM, N.C. (AP) - Dr. James L. Price, a Duke Univer- didn't ruin Ronald Kamen's wedding plans. Kamen, 22, was having a prenuptial dinner recently with his father, Herbert, when someone broke into young Kamen's ... ,. . , sity dean, says student activists, car and made off with his mar- He promises that.his new, / Du ke come from highl ye du-jria g e license, a pair of plane ars will 'look different al- ^^ dass tamj ., tjckels to Miamj) Fla-i two tick . loueh they won't have those ''• n-hamn pmi» anrf cars though they crazy, off - the - rear end flippers popularized, sort of, by the Chaparral. McLaren is also building new Formula-1 machines with Cos- worth Ford engines for. the Grand Prix circuit, an area where he hasn't been especially lies and are among the most academically talented students. Price, speaking at a meeting of Duke's alumni leaders, the Salmon in Life Battle with Dams By MIKE ROAN Associated Press Writer PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) One of nature's most amazing I rituals, already gone forever in most of the United States, has been drastically altered by the Northwest's many dams. For thousands of centuries nalmon made their voyages up' the nation's rivers to lay their' eggs and die. I But when man built water] wheels and dumped wastes Into | water the fish no longer were able to swim in most Eastern rivers and became practically extinct there. In the less populous Northwest, salmon still are able to hatch in a mountain stream. Driven by some compelling force, they travel down the Columbia River to the ocean, often 1,000 miles away. The salmon disappear into the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, but from two to six years later, in one of those mysteries that nature creates, they reappear, now fullgrown. Desperately, compulsively, at least 1.5 million fish fight their way upstream each year, always seeking the place they duced artificially In hatcheries. < nets who do not honor the ply. There the female's eggs are (states' fishing seasons. A biologist said: "You can't removed with a knife. They are j The fish again must navigate expect to raise a nest of robina dumped in s bucket and a male over dams. Scienlists have de- j In your backyard if you chop ' fish's sperm is poured over i vclopetl tlslr '••'•»rs that allow j down your trees." themselves were hatched. Biolo- j them. The eggs are put into \va-, the salmon to leap from one lev. gists say they use a variety ofiter to hatch, and the dead fish | el to another in pools of water senses to do so, including navi- arc sold for food at stale institu-1 until they are over the dam. gallon by the stars. But they lions or for fertilizer. i Grand Coulee Dam does not The odds against the newly have these, and there will never mostly use their sense of smell to find their place or origin. There the female fish lays Needed Lots of Help halched salmon making it to the | again be salmon in the upper ocean are great. At least 8 per j Columbia, which winds into thousands of eggs. The male cent are killed at each dam, Canada and down to western covers them with his sperm, going through the eleclric gen-!Montana Their Job done, they wearily erators. Some of them go' Millions of dollars have been start back downstream. They do not complete this journey. They die. But thousands of their offspring make the trip later instead. All salmon were born this way for thousands of years. But in the past 32 years, 24 dams have been built on the Columbia and Snake rivers, two of the prime sources of Pacific salmon. The result is that half of the water in the Columbia system is through nine dams. CARMICHAELS, Pa. (AP) -. i Albert Hathaway voluntered to' 'serve as secretary of the Towrr Council one night in 1920 "just to help out." Hathaway, a retired school-teacher, quit as council secra-. | spent | 0 preserve fish while tary tills week after 47 years. Years later as adults, on the i man builds dams and factories, way inland to lay their eggs,(There was even a taxi service they meet many hurdles. First they have to get by the ocean fishermen. The next hurdle is on at one dam in the Northwest. It picked up the fish and carried them by truck to another river. Now Many Wear FALSE TEETH the lower Columbia near Asto- Despite Hie spending, the ria where fishermen have their'salmon run is getting smaller nets ready during a strictly con-; every year in Idaho, even with trolled fishing season. The Ore-' hatcheries, because of the gon catch alone in the Columbia dams. is worth ?3.2 million a year. Farther upstream the fish are no longer accessible to salmon, greeted by sports fishermen, More and more of them are pro. I and Indian fishermen with gill- One fishery official says this is because the Northwesl chose the dams and as a result is in i danger of reducing its fish sup-1 With Little Worry DO your false teeth annoy and embarrass by slipping, dropping, or wobbling when you cat. laugh or tnlk? Then sprinkle a little FASTEETH on , your plntcfi. FASTEETH holds den-,; lures firmer and more comfortably.... Makes eating easier. It's alkaline—,,. doesn't sour. No gummy, gooey, pwty taste or fed. Helps check plate . odor. Dentures that fit are essential to health. See your dentist regularly. Get FASTEETH at all drug counters. sts for a Bahama cruise and clothing. . Sidney Marcovitz, administra-' g live assistant to County Clerk 1 SNOW BOAT offers n new twist on the old-fashioned sled this winter. Equipped with two drag brakes for steering and braking, the pblyethlese craft is tough enough to withstand a truck being driven over it, according to its manufacturer. GIVE MOM BACK HER "SCHOOLGIRL COMPLEXION- HANDS FOR CHRISTMAS. BUY HER A WHIRLPOOL DISHWASHER. N0.1INTOTALAWASHABILITY -*Top-Loading Portable! University National Council, Edward J. Barrett, heard about' { said it would be a mistake to dismiss the activists as alienated hippies or a handful of lawless, undisciplined "kooks." successful. And, of yes, he'll be driving a rather special car j , „ the Indianapolis 500, its said'' McLaren wasn't about to tell rassmeJnt _?. f: me whose ;r what. Australia and New Zealand have demonstrated their international superiority in tennis, which amounts to a national pas- _.,___-_ .. ,, m time in the Down Under coun-1 CAMBRIDGE Mass. (AP) tries. One might think that mo-jA limited pass-fail-option for all D . . I T_Tn»i.'M.rl o«yj T7firlnliffn otiirlcinfe lor sport. With the possible exception of The dean termed the activists' 'an and mended giving students the opportunity to participate in university policymaking and planning. racing is at least the second I Harvard and Radcliffe students 5 will take effect next September. Under the plan students may Britain,"™ comtriesTaTe'field"- choose one course each year to ed more international racing ! t>=_. marked only pass or drivers than Australia and New 'fail. the misfortune and made a special trip to his office on a Sunday morning to issue a duplicate license. The wedding took place as scheduled after the bridegroom bought new airline and steamship tickets. | lot Hunt Fails OSHKOSH, Wis. (AP) - An Oshkosh woman told police the | j bullet wound in her foot was the j j result of a bat hunt in the apart- j i ment in which she and her 20- year-old son live. Mrs. Jennie Oshowicz said she | and her son, Fred, 20, saw bats Zealand. There's Jack Brab- The new provision, approved j „ m jn the apar t men t w ] le n! ham, former World Driving recently by the Harvard faculty, , g Champion, yorld's largest build- is expected to encourage under- \^ alnved home earlv er of race cars, Australian. And j graduates to take courses in un- ;day. : former F-l teammate D e n n y ; familiar fields without fearing! They saw one hiding under a | Hulmc, 1967 World D r i v i n g, mediocre grades. . stuffed chair and the plan, she i Champion. And Chris Am on, young Ferrari driver, New Zealander. And McLaren EVANSTON, III. (AP) - A Cook County official with a I think that one of the rea-i heart made sure a burglar said, was that she would lift the | chair while her son shot the bat; with a ,22-caliber pistol. He, missed. i 159 00 NUMBER 1 IN TOTAL WASHABILITY! . „ - „ Front-Loading Portable! 199 Model SRC-70 5 •! \& Under Counter? 199 00 Model SS4-70 LOANS FOR SHOPPING! Need ready cash for Christmas and other year-end expenses? Apply fora low-cost holi- g day loan. With cash your holiday shopping | is fun rather than a bother! For complete | information drop by our office today! ! FIRST NATIONAL BANK CHRIST'S BIRTHPLACE! looks like tnli today. About 10,000 person* ire expected to , crowd iat« tto litUetown at Bethlehem for the Christmas pilgrimage. INSTALLMENT LOAN DEPT. Ph. PO 3-4443 Jim Gee Rex Mttigir > US All Three Models Have These Features: • FITS 24" SPACE, SAME AS MOST OLDER BUILT-INS. • 2 FULL SIZE REVOLVING SPRAY ARMS. • AUTOMATIC DETERGENT DISPENSER • BIG 800 WATT ELEMENT FOR FASTER DRYER AND EXTRA HOT WATER WASHING • 2 FULL CYCLES • 15 TABLE SETTING CAPACITY. HUBBARD & HOKE APPLIANCE DEPARTMENT

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