The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 7, 1950 · Page 9
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, April 7, 1950
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Page 9
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FRIDAY, APRIL T, 19M fAHK.l OOURIEC mtm Little Rock's Schedule Little Kock High School's long-awaited football schedule was announced last week and there was a noticeable bit of re-vamping. The Tigers' 1950 slate includes five Inter-sectional games with Central of Knoxvllle, Classen of Oklahoma City, Gadsden, Ala., Norman, Ofcla., and Tilghman of Paducali, Ky. On the schedule Is only one Arkansas school aitWde the Big Six—Sublaco. Tf Little Eoek officials, when they broke off relations with our Chick»saws, said they wanted to play more out-of-state teams because of better financial arrangements. In other words, larger out-of-state schools can pay a bigger guarantee than the so-termed "small fry" of Arkansas. But the Arkansas Gazette, In announcing the schedule, gave as the main reason lor the drastic change in the Tigers' schedule "needling from Bengal critics who say they pick on small Arkansas schools for their football victories." Just what "critics" have been doing the needling, the Gazelle didn't say. But tliere is some doubt In our mind that this reason will hold water, for the Gazelle went on lo say that the Tigers will lose through impending graduation their first three backnelds and much of the line from last fall's squad. And then a couple of breaths laler It quoted Wilson Matthews, Tiger coach, as saying, "We'll take It on the chin next fall, but we won't be clucking anyone who has a good ball club." Apparently Mr. Matthews doesn't think too much of the Double-A brand of football in his home state or Is it that he has forgotten 1948 already? Could be he wants to. But Just to .refresh his memory, there are two are three "small fry" teams in north and northeast Arkansas that'are quite capable of giving him a good ball game win, lose or draw. And if, at any time, he would care to argue the point, all he will have to fio Is briUB along his equipment. . Charley Adds to Confusion And while on the subject of Little Rock—we ran across Charley Grey who was assistant Tiger coach In 1941 and 1948 and who Is now a member of the University of Arkansas coaching staff, in town yesterday and chatted quite a spell with him. During the course of tlie conversation the Big SIx-Blythcville severance was brought up. : Charley spoke freely on the subject, more so in fact, than we expected. "I don't know what the trouble is," he said, "but whatever It is It . should te straightened out. It's bad for schools of a state to be fighting, especially schools like Blythevllle, Little Hock and Pine Bluff." • Someone mentioned that, there were reports that rouEh football was the cause and Charley was quick to reply: "Football Is a rough game, it can't be any other way. But in my two years at Little Rock I don't remember an excessive amount of roughness in a Blythevlile-Llttle Rock game. A lot of rivalry, but that's natural: The 1048 game was a good "'•: You beat us. That's all there was to it. And you came pretty ti'td'doing the same thing in the 1947 playoS game." "As for ill-feeling, I don't know. During the time I was at Little Rock I never heard but one thing said against Blytheville at a Big Six meeting nnd that came from Hot Springs. We wanted to Include Blythe- vllle in the Big Six but Hot Springs and Fort Smith were opposed to it. The Hot Springs representative did all the talking. The best I can remember his beef was the geographical location of Blytheville. Anyway, he said Hot Springs would have nothing to do with the Big Six If .Blytheville was Included." Pettit is Pounded As BUGS Rap Pels; Parneil Goes Limit ... By the Associated Preaf The exhibition baseball chatter today was mostly about pitching performances, including one by the $100,000 bonus baby, Paul Pettit,' which could be called both good and bad, Pettit is the 18-year-old California lad recently acquired by the Pittsburgh Pirates in a deal that caused considerable commotion and excitement. Paul was shipped to the Pirates' farm club, New Orleans. Just a few days ago he hurled five hitless innings against minor league opposition. Yesterday he was sent in to pitch* against major leaguers— the boss Pirates. , Perhaps young Paul h«d » ease of stage freight, At »ny r»te, before the first Inning was over, he had given six runs. Three straight walks filled the bases. Pettit then allowed three singles, a double, (.wild pitch and a balk, with * double steal sandwiched In. Northwestern Signs Olsen As Cage Coach But . Red Sox Win Paul stayed .in there for § That statement threw another wrinkle in our already furrowed brow. All along we have been led to believe that Hot Springs possibly was Blytheville's lone friend in the Big Six and we respected , the Trojans as such. But U that is the case, then maybe it's Just as well that our Big Six ties are broken. Anyway, the situation remains the same. Blytheville is going its merry way. Little Rock, North Little Rock and Pine Bluff are doing the same. And, to put It bluntly, 1J there Is any getting together to be done, it more than likely will have to be done from the other end as Blytheville officials feel that they have gone their hah! way. . three more Innings and, indicating he may yet prove his mettle, blanked the major leaguers over that stretch. Pittsburgh won the game played In the Crescent City, 10-7. Mel Parneil, ace Boston Red Sox moundsman, showed the kind of form that won 25 games last ye»r as he let down the Jacksonville Tars of the Sally League with no runs and four hits In a lull route job won by Boston, 12-0. Parneil struck out live »nd worked in a chill wind. It was the first nine inning job by a Red .Sox hurler this spring. Ted Williams socked a three-run homer. Bob Kuzava, Chicago White Sox southpaw, came within a few tnche» of a no-hitter against the Houston Texas League, club. Chicago . got only three hits In winning. 2-0. ^The lone -bmgle off Kuzava came in . the fifth inning. Nick Adiick belted one down the left Held foul line for a two-bagger. The New York aiants also got an all-the-way pitching stint from Sheldon Jones, who led his team to a 5-1 victory over the Cleveland Indians. ' . Jones gave nine hits but never allowed Cleveland to bunch them. The single tally off Mm was the result of a wild pitch, two walks and an outfield fly. , Skee RJegel's 69 Leads Masters Only Eight Golfers ' Break Par on Tough Augusta Layout By Sterling Slappejr .AUGUSTA. Ga., April 7.' (AD — The stars of the 14th Masters Tournament field tried again today to break the spell ol a championship course and find tho way to glory on Its rolling greens. Onlj> stocky Skee RIegel managed snb-10 shooting among the 65 golfers yesterday in the first round. RIegel celebrated his first major tournament try as a professional by firing a 68. Just seven other golfer? broke par 72 at the great Augusta National course which has seen the best and conquered most of them. TRAINING CAMP BRIEFS By the. Associated frtm MONTGOMERY, Ala., April 7. (A 1 ) —Manager Red Rolfe won't give up on injured Charley Keller as a helpful guy to have around for the Detroit Tigers. . One good sock off Keller's bat was enough to re-convince Rolfe, who counts on Charley as a pinch- hitter. It was a 302-foot, plnch-hlt homer at Macon. "Anybody who hits « ball that far has to have power," said Red. "Even If he were batting against Dick Bnrtell (Tiger coach) in batting practice. I'd think it a good sign." off two bonus players for seasoning with the Columbia and Charleston farm clutis—Ed Bailey and Oerry Blackburn, who represent a com blned outlay of about $76,000. CHICAGO, April 7. (/P)—Northwestern lias a new basketball coach today, but Michigan State Isn't so ' Sports in Spurts Charley had a very encouraging report on Billy Wayne McParland. Mac, he said, a definitely being groomed as a first string defensive halfback this year and is showing good promt*. Bill had to miss the Razor- bucks' Intra-squad game last week due to * leg injury received the day before. . . . Coach Jimmy Fisher's basketball promotional program is going over in a big way. Enough lumber for six goals has already beerf oxirchased and the goals are in the process of manufacture now. They're llpS^duled for erection ; on various Yacant lots of the city within' a Week 6r'*o. . . . Connie Mack, who at four score and revert is still looking for that "one more pennant," »izes the American League race up u a five- team tight among Boston, New York, Cleveland, Detroit and hi« A's. And again he expects the A's to finish on top. Large Turnout For 14th Annual Dixie Relays BtRMINOKAM, Ala., April T. OT —A H-conference turnout for the third annual Southern Relays today aimed a. dazzling threat at longstanding Dixie track and field re- cordi. Prom the southwest, midwest and tast the best contenders of 30 colleges and universities poured into Birmingham for the competition starting tomorrow. Jim puchs of Yale, claimant of the world Shot-put record, was the individual star of about 1,000 specialists preparing for the opening gun. . •' : • The towering Fuchs tossed trie 18-pound shot-put 56 feet seven . Inches in practice here yesterday easily bettering the stadium record .£1 53 feet 8'A Inches. •jYale, Oklahoma A. .V. M., am ^rjewanee were already on the fielc as the vanguard of the event arrived today. Sharp competition looms In the mile relay with Louisiana State nnd the Oklahoma Aggie teams battling. Three of the Tigers who won lasl year in 3:20.3 are due back. The Aggies have a team which wa clocked at 3:16.4 in the Sugar Bow mile with one of their best men Cupt. Hal Tarrant, not running. >orker and A1C Peams Beaten By The AMOClated Prex Arkansas University and college thletio teams came off second a- alnst best put-of-itate competition Thursday. University of Tulsa beat Unlver- ity of Arkansas, 5-1, in tennis at layetteville. Tulsa won three of our singles contests and both doubles. Arkansas Tech lost Its second of .wo baseball games with the Uni- ersity of Iowa. The lowans defeated Tech, 7-1, at Ruuellvllle. Arkansas State Journeyed, to Memphis to lose at baseball. There Memphis State downed the Jones- x>ro team, 11-5. In an intra-state affair, the Hen- drijc track team defeated Ouachlta, 72-56. at Conway. Bill Yates ot Hendrix was high Individual scorer with H',4 points. Memphis Gets Com* OXFORD, Miss., April 7. (*}— Freshmen football teams of the University football teams of the University of Mississippi and the University of Arkansas wll play at Memphis Crump Stadium next Oct. 6, It was announced here yesterday. It will be a night game. Turkey growing Is a leading agricultural pursuit In Utah. Exhibition Baseball Yeiterday'm Resnlta Boston (A) 12, Jacksonville (Sal) 0 Chicago (AV 3, Houston (TL) 0 Detroit ~(A) '7, Atlanta (SA) 5"~ Boston (N) B. Cincinnati (N) T New,York (N) 5, Cleveland (A) 1 Pittsburgh (N) 10. New Orleans (SA) 7 . . Brooklyn "B" (N) 7, Montgomery ,(SAL) 4 St. Ixrais (A) 14. Chicago (N) 1 Philadelphia (N) 7. Shreveport (TL) 4 Brokolyn (N) 14, Port Worth (T L) 11 ' Philadelphia (A) vs. Baltimore (ID (cold weather) Today's Schedule Bo«ton (Al vs. Macon at Macon, On-. New York (N) «. Cleveland (A) at Shreveport. La. Detroit (A) vs. Montgomery at Montgomery, Ala. New York (A) vi. Birmingham at Birmingham, Ala. Chicago (N) vs. Dallas at Dallas, Tex. Brooklyn (N) vs. Atlanta at Atlanta, Ga. Boston (N) vs. Chinclnriati (N) at Balelgh, N. C. Philadelphia (N> v«. Fort Worth at Fort worth, Tex. Brooklyn (N) CB squad) vs Reids•ville »t JWldsville, N. C. St. Louis (A) vs. San Antonio a San Antonio, Tex. (night) Pittsburgh (N) vs. Chattanooga at Chattanooga, Term. sure It has. The Spartans officially announced yesterday they had hired Wilbur N. (Sparky) Stalcup of Missouri to succeed Al Kircher. But Stalcup. 12 hours later in a midnight message, said he had not made up his mind whether to accept or not. His statement came after Ralph H. Young, director of athletics at Michigan State, named him as the Spartans' new coach. Mr. Young apparently Issued the statement o ( my appointment through a mlsuiide'rstandlng,*' said Stalcup from his Columbia, Mo., home. "I will let him know Friday night." . Northwestern chose Harold G. Olsen, whose Ohio State teams from 1922 to 194« won five Western conference titles, olsen, originator of the NCAA basketball tournament setup in 1939 and chairman of the Tourney Committee for eight years, resigned at Ohio State to coach the Chicago Stags pro club. The 54-year-old, roly-poly mentor left the Stags'a year ago. He succeeds Arthur (Dutch) Lonborg, who resigned after 23 years at Northwestern to be'come University of Kansas athletic director. " Northwestern also named Robert P. Reihsen. a Minnesota athlete from 1929-1931, as an assistant football coach to fill a post also left by Lonborg's resignation. The 6,900 yards of thickly sodded, never flat fairways and the hill- locked greens were exceedingly rough for all but a tew. Jim Ferricr of San Francisco, Korton Smith of Detroit, Jimmy DeniarH of OJal, Calif., Lawson Little of Monterey, Cnlii., and Herchel Spears of Huntsville, Ala., got under par with 70's. Snead Has 71 Little Toney Penna ol Cincinnati and defending champion Sam Snend of White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., had 71's. Johnny Piilmer, the Badin, N.O. pro who was picked to win the masters l>y fellow golfers, managed a round in par. Many another great ot golf was left with the kind of score hardly worth whispering about — Jack Burke, Jr., Lloyd Mangrum and Chick Hnrbert with 76's and Byron Nelson, Herman Kelser, Gary MW- dtecoff .and Herman Baron with f5's. Cubs PI ay Dallas DALLAS, Texas, April 7. W) — Tlie Chicago Cubs nnd Charlie Grimm will be on opposite slclcs for the first time In three years tonight. The cubs eiiRage Dallas of the Texas League, sktupered by Grimm who resigned as Cub vice president to take the Job. The Cubs are looking for a kill after absorbing a 14-2 licking by the St. Louis Browns nt Snn An- lonlo last night as Doyle Lade was powdered for seven runs in the first three innings. Hello and Goodby ORLANDO, Fin., April 7. Sanclalio Consuegra, young Cuban rlglithand hurler called for a trla with the Washington Nats, arrived and left without throwing a hall. Me went into a huddle yeslerda wilh Clark Griffith, Nats' president and asked for $3.000 to pay off Venezuelan team with which sold he had signed a contract. Griffith sent him back to Cub on the next plane. Clilsox Face Loss NEW OHLEANS. April T. Wl— The Chicago While Sox face an estimated loss of $43,000 on their spring exhibition tour. General Manager Frank Lane has estimated the total cost of the train- Ing period at $74.000, or about $1,500 per day. In 22 exhibition gnmes thus far, the Sox have drawn 48.000 customers, which if an average Is maintained, will give them about 66,000 for the schedule. Lane figures the team will have received a little.less thnn 50 cents per paid admission. Ben Hogan and national amateur chnmirxm Charlie Coe tied with George Fazio at 73. • ' There WR.S a striking similarity with 1949 as the 1950 Masters went Into Ihe second round. At the opening of the second round last year, a 09 led the field— Lloyd Mangrum's. Toiiay, Riegel's 69 was best. At the opening of the second 1949 round 51 golfers had scores below 80. It was the same today—61 players were under 80. Rraves Beat Reds RALEIGH, N.C., April 7. (/!") — Boston's Braves will try to make it two victories in as many (lays over their National League opponents, the Cincinnati Reds, today when the two clubs play the second Rome In their six game traveling series.. The two clubs bussed. here last nlijht from . Columbia, where the Tribe edged the Rhine- landers 8-7 yesterday. Vern Blck- ford will start for the Braves and may attempt to go the distance. There's No Tomorrow WEST !>ALM BEACH, Fin,, April 1. (/O—Connie Mack snys there "will be no tomorrow" for his Philadelphia Allilellcs this season. The 87-year-otd mnnagcr wa\ speaking of his pitchers when he mnclc Hint remark. What he was driving at is that tlie A's in 1950 will use every pitcher on tho stuff if necessary to win "today's" (same. Over Uncertain About Hot Corner HOUSTON, Texas, April J. (AP) —Knzak or Glavlano? Manager Eddie Dyer ot the St. Louis Cardinals says he hnsn't made up his mind about a third baseman to open the regular season April 18. , Torhmy ainvlnno, who held the Job al Iho close of the season last year, hasn't been hitting. He replaced Eddie KaMk alter the lat- Icr hiul broken nn-ankle. The ankle has Improved and Kazak lias played' In 20 games spring. But his hitting has been spotty. Sanity Coc/e : Changes Aske'd By Committee • CHICAGO, April T. im — Th« NCAA's embattled sanity code «.p- penred geared for revision today after n successful fact-finding meet- Ing of the nation's alhletlc chiefs.— Officials of 20 conferences »e- compllshod In two days what It would normally take two months to do by going through channels. Six proposals for amending the code were drafted. They were kept secret. NCAA President Hugh O. Wlllett of Southern California said they ranged from "absolutely no change up lo considerable additional aid for worthy athletes." The proposals, ho said, pointed toward these common alms: 1—that alhleles getting ftitl must be academically worthy both tn college entrance'and progress towards de- Detachments of U.S. Marines formed part of Commodore Perry expedition to Japan which opened the doors of the Mikado's realm In 1853-54 to commerce. EASTER FLOWERS BLYTHEVILLE FLOWER MART Memphis Hiwaj Phone 6«02 ll rr THE RAZORBACK PRESENTS Jamae at the Hammond Organ NOW PLAYING 7 NIGHTS A WC£K! 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. Daily Enjoy Your Food in the Pleasant Atmosphere of Our Beautiful Dining Room We Specialize in Seafoods * Barbecue Ribs • Barbecue Chicken The RAZORBACK FISHING? Hollywood Yankees in Need Of Fifth Starter BIRMINGHAM, Ala., April 7. (ff) —Manager Casey Stengel admittedly •ould like a fifth starting hurler for if New York .Yankees, but says I like our pitching staff as good as anybody's." "I'd say our pitching right now oitr weakest link," says Stengel. Nobody has control. Our pitchers have walked 150 men and have truck out only 87." Casey still claims the pitchers need at least a week-earlier spring raining start than other players, saying there Is not sufficient time them all to get the work they need. Demon Returns SAN ANTONIO, Texas, April 7. j —Billy Demars, the St. Louis Browns leading hitter, is expected jack In the, lineup today against the Browns' San Antonio farm club. He missed yesterday's game with the Chicago. Cubs after being hit on the left wiist Wednesday by pitched ball. Demara U hitting .«35. AMERICAN LEGION Presents Continued from Page 8 vital statistics as a star with a knockout body. "Not an ounce of excess ilesh on her," he raves. And she, rws'a-sardpritc sense of humor. that her, hips must be curved a Whenever Saxer would tc!l her certain nay. Gre Gee would twist her mouth Bognrl - fashion and mutter, "Who told you?" Clifton Webb nnd Clnudette Colbert are beautiful specimens, according to Saxcr. "Beautifully controlled," he says of olaudette. Clan Bad Girl . "Paulette Goddard," he »ay«, "doesn't stick to anything. She comes here to my studio, needing the rhythm and exercise so very, very much and SHE tella ME what to do. You see, she does not like anything that Is not all peaches and cream:" Saxer's satin-draped diploma goes to Gary Cooper. "Ah," he rhapsodizes, "Gary has a big brain and a foxy eye. I make like this with my hnads, Gary takes one look and he does It better. He Is the most graceful of Hollywood male stars. He knows the poetry of movement." Need Extra Base Rlow SHREVEPORT, La., April 7. (/Tt— Cleveland's Indians needed an extra base hit in the worst sort of way today. For 30, innings now, the- might Tribesmen haven't been able pound out anything better than measley single. They got nine yes terday in losing' to the New York Giants',. 6-1, and they got four on Wednesday when the Giants beat them B-2. ; - t , pn Tuesday, lt>was the same story, nine hits and nil singles, but the Indians won that game, 7-6. firce requirements; 2—there must be positive and definite evidence aid recipients need assistance (no "across - the - boards - grants"); 3— all such aids must be administered by regular campus agencies. The proposals, undoubtedly Including the south's suggestion for free board and room to the needy, now will be funnelled to a screening committee. From there they go to the NCAA's policy-making council in August and on to the NCAA's annual convention In Dallas next January. • For Improved' KIDNEY FUNCTION In a majority of cam Invert- flared in wveral hoipitolt and clinics, subnormal Kidney function waj Improved, Bladder pain and diicomfort reduced after HMUM of Mountain Valley WaW. . If your doctor hoi dtagrioMd your condition at functional Kidney impairment fhl» natural, untreated mineral water may b« v*ry beneficial. Try it for a few weeks. It a delkloui, pure-renting, mnd Bray be coniumed freely, Cross town Whiskey Shop Main fc Division ' Rookie Best: Ret • RALEIQH. N.C., April 7. (/P) — Manager Luke Sewell of the Cincinnati Reds say.i It looks like rookie pitcher Frank Smith is his "best bel now to handle the major portion of relief chores." The six-foot-three" righthander hurled in-a'relief role yesterday a Columbia when the Reds were beaten 8-7 by the Boston Braves. At Columbia the Redlegs dropped We tan Tomhrt yom with everything yon'need for fooi fishing. Will boy any amount of roaches. DIXIELAND BAITERY 511 Chick. Ph. 4303 Onr Telephone Number 4438 Shelton Motor Co. BROS. Wed. Apr. 12 Matinee and Night 4 p.m. 8 p.m. 24 Thrilling Acts American Legion Auditorium ADMISSION: Adults $1.20 Children GOc (Tax Included) Advance Tickets on Sale At rtay* Whlte'i Shoe Store SAVE ToirTeiper nl Mut! bylRStaniutktJlEV Screen Frames TM! It'i tr*«! K*TM •? 10 Sioiiy rnbeml T»l»io Wftrplng oatef ib*p« OT No i «.»d r°° l""fc k..T T , clou. 7 !,»•*. tm\\lnq to ?Uc*«. Quality Always- Regardiess of Price Wh»lever yon p»y for » tine wed car here yoa can be lure of one thlni—(he c«r will not dlMppoInt yoa. We're here to nuke inre of that. 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