Mexico Ledger from Mexico, Missouri on May 13, 1948 · Page 8
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Mexico Ledger from Mexico, Missouri · Page 8

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Mexico, Missouri
Issue Date:
Thursday, May 13, 1948
Page:
Page 8
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Local Weather — Mexico high yesterday 61 Low this morning 45 Temperature 7 a. m 53 Precipitation: .02 in. rain May to date 2.56 in. Normal for May 4.69 in Year to date 10.77 in. Normal to June 1 15.53 in Sun, sets today at 7:13 p. m. Sun rises tomorrow at 4:57 a.«m. Area Forecast— Missouri—Generally fair anid warmer tonight and Friday; low tonight in the 40's; high Friday in.the.70's. At City Hospitals— AUDRAIN, May 13, admitted: F, R. Adams, Mrs. Stella Powell, Mexico; Mrs. Juanita Sue Beedle, Vandalia; Everett Clark, Jr., Buell; Mrs. Mary Amanda West- errrian, Bellflower. Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Prater, Mexico, a son, Thursday. Dismissed: W. L. Harshbarger, Mrs. Faye Mahurin, L. J. Mich- aelison, Wesley M. Blankenship, .Mexico; Mrs. Ada Anderson, Lad donia; Linda Fern Roberts, Van dalia; Mrs. Arleta Adams and son, Curryville; James Combs Middletown; Mrs. Hazel Brown Centralia. GENERAL, May 13, admitted: Mrs. Russell Jones, Mexico; Wan da Weeks, Bellflower. Dismissed: Mrs. Paul Dorr Mexico; Mrs. James Bontz""and son, Vandalia. Magistrate Court — Set for Friday, May 28, hearing on two cases involving a driving offense charged by the state highway patrol on Highway 54 east Lee M. Fritch is charged with . driving xvhile intoxicated, and is free on $1000 bond with M. V.'Sniith as surety. Floyd P. Schmidt is charged with permitting.-a motor vehicle owned by him, to be operated by a person unauthorized to drive, Lee M. Fritch. He is on $200 bond with M. V. Smith as surety. County Court — Granted package liquor license to Nathan Cohen, doing business as Little Dixie Tobacco Co. at 215 S. Jefferson St., Mexico. Local Markets — Eggs 36c Cream 72c-69c Leghorn hens 16c Capons 35c-40c Stags 12c Heavy hens 24c Cash Grain —• Soybeans $3.73 Corn 2.24 Wheat 2.26 Oats :.. 1.03 E. St. Louis Livestock— HOGS, receipts 9,000; steady; barrows and gilts $21.25; sows $16.00. CATTLE, receipts 1,700; calves 1,100; steady; steers $31.00; veal- ers $32.00. SHEEP, receipts 500; strong; lambs $31.00; ewes $12.50. Chicago Livestock — <.HOGS, receipts 11,500; steady to' higher; barrows and gilts $21.75; sows $15.50. CATTLE, receipts 5,800; calves 500; -higher; steers $33.25; veal- ers $30.00. : SHEEP, receipts 1,500; higher; lambs'$28.50 (new record); ewes unqu'bted. New York Stocks— NEW YORK, May 13. (£>)— Rails today led a lively stock market to a new average high since early 1948 although many leaders stumbled over more urgent selling. .Dealings were fast from the start with low-quoted issues coming out in large blocks. Top gains running to a point or so were reduced in most cases and tKd minus column was well filled near the close. .Transfers of about 1,900,000 shares were the best since April 23.' Tangle Over Film Showing Fighting flares in front of the Koxy Theatre in New York City as police, avowed Communists and Catholic War Vets tangled when a jeering crowd of more than 4,000 persons congregated at the theatre where the anti-Communist film, "The Iron Curtain," opened. The man in the center is staggered by a sharp left.—(NBA Tclephoto by Andrew Lopez, NBA Staff Photographer) Long Distance Operators Plan National Strike WASHINGTON, May 13. (/Pi- Plans for a nation-wide strike of long distance telephone operators were set up today by the CIO American Telephone Workers .union but the date for a walkout was left open. The union headed by John J. Moran, has been 'engaged in a wage dispute with the American Telephone and Telegraph company. , The union represents 23,000 long distance workers in 42 states. Union and A. T. & T. representatives came here yesterday for conferences with conciliators of the federal mediation services in an effort to reach an agreement. Moran said actions of the A. T. & T. and "failure to find some method of effecting a peaceful settlement leaves us with but one choice—a nationwide strike." The union wants a 30 cents an hour wage boost, a shorten work week and larger pensions. It says workers now average $1.21 an hour. * Sleeps After Quiz Earl Cadle, 31, falls asleep in a chair at a Chicago police station following questioning in connection with the shooting of his mother. Police said Cadle confessed shooting his invalid mother five times, critically wounding her after brooding over her ill health and his inability to care for her.—(NBA Telephoto) YOU WON'T FORGET .... These Bargains MEN'S RAYON SLACKS. Many colors and Pattersn. $3.98 up MEN'S GABARDINE SLACKS Excellent buys $3.69 up MEN'S WORK PANTS Famous Kast Iron Brand $1.98 up MEN'S WORK SHIRTS. Real Bargains in Khaki Shirts. $1.69 up Sturdy Denim Overall Pants Mens Genuine Western Levis - You Can't Beat These Men's Blue Jeans - - Boys' Blue Jeans Fine Styling Boys' Gabardine Slacks Boys'Tee-Shirts Boys' Ail-Purpose Jimmy-Alls only 3.45 only 1.89 only 1.79 - - 2.98 - - 39c - - 89c The Outlet Store 206 S. Jefferson Phone 63 'Ugly Words Make Ugly Children'— Anti-Profanity Slogan Contest Winners Picked at Eugene Field Awards to the winners of a slogan contest to eliminate profanity among the students at Eugene Field School were presented Thursday morning at a special assembly held at the school. The contests was sponsored by the Parent-Teacher Association, headed by Mrs. Glen Mclntire, in cooperation with the 1 Mexico Ministerial Alliance. The Rev. William J. Jarman, pastor of the First Christian church, presented the awards to the three winning children in each of the six; grades. The prizes were $1.50 for! the best slogan,- $1 for the second ! and 50c for third place. Linda Williams was the first grade winner with her slogan, "Ugly Words Make Ugly Children," with Kathleen Clark and Martha Boyd as other winners. The prize for the second grade was won by Carolyn McNatt, vvhose slogan was "Keep the Inside as Clean as the Outside." Sue Russell and Bob Wilson were other^second grade winners. "Get a Boost up the Ladder of Success with Good Speech instead of a Kick Backward with Profanity" was the prize win-! ning slogan in the third grade' with Betty Iman and Betty Wray winning second and third. Carol Dodson won in the fourth grade with her slogan, "Bad Language is Like a Scar, Your Appearance is Better Without It," and Susan Green and ] Alice Hane were other winners! of that grade. Glee Thompson's "Bad Word in Our Speech, Like Weeds in a Garden, Should be Pulled Out" Mexico (Mo.) Evening Ledger Page 8—Thu., May 13, 1948 won first place in the fifth grade with Bobby Joe Miller winning second place and Donald Davis, third place. The sixth grade winner was Frederick McNatt with "Keep Your Mind as Clean as Your Face" as his slogan. Other winners in the sixth grade were Howard Cochrone and Patricia Groff. Miss Annie B 1 ,oe was in charge of the assembly that also included a choral reading, "Rock- A-Bye Lady," by the fifth grade pupils, and the Eugene Field School by the student body. Are you reading about Mexico and Audrain county firsts in "The Roundup" column on page two. You'll learn about your home town history. Railmen Want Settlement WASHINGTON, May 13. (&)— The three railroad brotherhoods which called off their threatened nation-wide strike Monday night will run the % trains as long as the government has control of the railroads. But the minute the lines are turned back to the carriers, whether in two weeks or two years, they'll call another strike unless an agreement is reached meanwhile in their wage-rules dispute. That was the word today from one of the top brotherhood men. He talked to a reporter on condi- tion his name would not be disclosed. This officer said the unions ex- pc-ct thr temporary restraining order against the engineers, firemen and switchmen to be. made permanent by Federal Judge T. Alan Golclsborough after a hearing next week. This would prevent the unions from striking as long as the government has control. But the union leader said, the three brotherhoods still consider as fair and proper their demands for a 30 percent wage increase and 23 changes in working rules. WAITRESSES WANTED AT JEFFERSON CAFE Announcing The Opening Of Our NEW DINING ROOM We can now accommodate many more people and will be happy to serve you! PROMPT, PLEASING SERVICE Fish Served Every Friday! CAVE'S CAFE 403 WEST MONROE .x. ROBERT and LELAND WRIGHT Present for Your Enjoyment . . . DOTTY DRIPPLE By Buford Tune BARGAINS IrV NEW FURNITURE That Are Very Definitely Worth Your Attention 4 Piece Poster Bedroom Suite with night Stand $159.50 6 Drawer Walnut Chest 29.95 Innerspring Mattresses ...... 23.50 to 49.50 Steel Bound Coil Bed Springs .11.95 to 24.50 Wood and Metal Beds $10.75 to 19.50 Gold Seal Linoleums, 9x12 $10.75 Kitchen Cabinet, Porcelain Top $54.50 Chrome Breakfast Set, 5 piece $64.50 EASY TERMS FREE DELIVERY WRIGHT BROS. FURNITURE CO. 111 N. COLE ST. MEXICO, MO. PHONE 1445 116 W. JACKSON PHONE 247 DRASTIC REDUCTIONS AT WARDS PRICES All Wool Blanket Reg. 7.98 • - 5 97 39 Inch Wide Reg. 35c Unbleached Muslin - - O? 0 Reg. 3.39 White Crepe Gowns - - ]47 Can't Run Nylon Hose - - 127 Reg. 1.69 Reg. 7.98 Little Girls'Coats - - 2 97 Reg. 10.98 Little Girls'Coats - - 39? Reg. 39c Children's Rayon Panties - 2J C Reg. Men's Covert Work Pants - |I7 Reg. 1.98 Mens'Twill Workshirts - - ()Jc Reg. 1.00 GROUP ONE • 49c Cap Covers • $1.00 Men's Ties • 39c Gardex Car Polish • 65c Salt and Pepper Shakers —QUANTITIES LIMITED— Heat-Proof Mixing Bowls - gjc Reg. 9.95 2J Qt. Pressure Saucepan - 097 Reg. 2.95 24 Piece Refreshment Set - 247 Reg. 2.49 17 Piece Beverage Set - - 197 _ , Reg. 17.50 I H.P. Split Phase Motor - |J97 GROUP TWO • 54c 42x36 Pillow Cases • 98c Men's Belts • 98c Men's Suspenders • 59c Bath Towels —QUANTITIES LIMITED— Reg. 4.75 Metal Medicine Cabinet - - 997 Steel Shower Stall - - - Reg 49.95 Auto Spotlights - Reg. 14.95 - - - 9 97 GROUP THREE 1.77 Tennis Shoes ' 1.79 Boys' Bib Overalls 2.98 Twill Auto Seat Covers 2.98 Girls' Skirts Size 2-6

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