The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on December 5, 1967 · Page 14
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 14

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, December 5, 1967
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Page 14
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tagt Fourteen "-Blyflievill* (Ark.) Courier News - Tuesday, December », 196T Driving Savvy Via Dia By BOB COCHNAR NEW YORK ~ (NBA) - It all started because Fred Friendly got a speeding ticket on this town's Henry Hudson Parkway. As punishment, he was hauled into traffic court and instructed to take a National Safety Council driver safety test. Friendly, after a bit of grumbling, found the test enlightening. So he asked himself, "Why shouldn't everybody in the country take this test?" Since Friendly was news chief for CBS-TV at the time, he put the National Drivers Test on television and while perhaps not everybody in the country has taken it, a lot have. A revised test will be telecast at 10 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 5. CBS producer and director Vern Diamond is the new boss o{ the popular lest and told me a few of his experiences in producing the program over a bile at New York's Le Chanteclair, the motor racing hangout. "At least I have become very conscious of good driving," he remarked amidst the photographs and memorabilia of the world's greatesl racing drivers. '•I am now a bug on defensive driving. In fact, my friends tell me I'm beginning to sound like a crusader." Diamond admits that the first test telecast met with some nervousness among CBS bigwigs. Taking a theme from the Detroit automakers, they possibly reasoned sell. that "safety doesn't But the first test reached a huge audinc and mo vry-eeestha huge audience and most everybody who saw it apparently liked it. "We've found it to be a great family broadcast," Diamond says. "It involves a lot of personal arguments." But who will .admit he's a lousy driver? Driving is a matter of intense pride, it would seem, and "the other guy" is usually at fault in an accident, certainly not the bloke who turns into Mario Andretti hind the wheel. be- This is probably why the Interestingly, although the drivers willingly executed the setup accidents invented by Diamond and his staff, they refused o do some of the crashes in lardtops. "Hardtops may be Today In History By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Today is Tuesday, Dec. 5, the 339th day of 1967. There are 26 days left in the year. Today's highlight in history: On this date in 1941, Brilain declared war on Finland, Romania and Hungary. On this date: In 1782, the eighth American president, Martin Van Buren, was born. In 1791, Austrian composer Wolfgang Mozart died. In 1832, President Andrew Jackson was re-elected, defeating Henry Clay. In 1848, in his annual message they certainly are not so safe as sedans with tough door posts." Before taking the CBS test, you might want to clip out the test form printed below and use sporty," Diamond says, "b u 11 it for your answers. to Congress, President James | his gall bladder. CBS PRODUCER VERN DIAMOND sets up winter driving scene with associate for the 1967 NatiojmL Drivers Tost scheduled forJlp^.jn^_Tiiesdav.__Dec.__5. CBS-TV tests have been so successful. "After all," Diamond says, "nobody has to see your test scores when you're at home before your television set." The questions asked by Walter Cronkite on the program seem easy enough, but they are deceptive. For example, doesn't everybody know that if you want to increase tire traction on an icy road you weigh your Irunk? Well? I'm not going to ruin the show for you by divulging the answer, but let me say it might not be what you think. The test is geared to prepare the driver for winter. Some questions have to do with operating a vehicle on slippery, snow -, filled streets. The questions are provocative. The answers are useful. Setting up accident s c en e s took a good deal of planning so that the accidents weren't fatal to participtants. "We have yet to lose a driver or a camera," Diamond says. The test pilots were usually retired racing drivers who knew a lot about the capabilities of their cars. Polk confirmed the discovery of gold in California, making a gold rush inevitable. In 1933, Prohibition in the United States came to an end as Utah became the 30th state to ratify in the 21st Amendment to the Constitution. In 1943, Japanese planes made their first daylight attack on Calcutta, India, during World War II. Ten years ago: U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles acknowledged that the Soviet Un ion was ahead of the United States in some respects in the missile field. Five years ago: It was disclosed thai Ihe rale of U.S. unemployment had risen sharply to 5.8 per cent of the work force. One year ago: It was announced that former Presidenl Dwight D. Eisenhower would undergo surgery for removal of Hurry Sundown for British THE 1967 NATIONAL DRIVERS TEST Fill in the blanks Y or N (Yes or No) with T or F , A, B, C or D or appropriate word. Opinion scored. 1 2 3 A 6 7 S 9 10 1 1 12. .. 13 14 15 IB 17 18 19 (True or False), (multiple choice), questions aren't 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 TOTAL SCORE OPINION QUESTIONS 1 •7 3 . . By JOHN CUNNIFF ! AP Business Analyst NEW YORK (AP) - The British once boasted that the sun never set on the British Empire but there are days now when British executives and government men must sigh with relief when dusk finally comes. These are gray times for Britain, and the dark mists that now precede winter seem a symbol also of her trials. Her chronic ills demand one operation after another. And still the maladies persist. One can go far back in history to find the root of some of today's ailments, among them, her loss of colonies, the cost and devastation of World War II, the loss of able men in war without an infusion through immigration. But, whether cause or effect, some of her immediate problems today seem to surpass anything that could have been expected. They are like evil spirits, and it is understandable that British believe in ghosts. Who could have predicted the damming of the Suez Canal through,which much of Britain's trade was routed? Wo could have foreseen the obstinate refusal of France to permit Britain to join and share in the trade benefits of the Common Market? Who could have stated with any assurance just 15 years ago that Britain would lose some of her best brains, the brains needed to rebuild a nation, drained abroad by financial and academic rewards? And what kind of madness in the British psyche was it that' brought about a dockworker strike at the very time the country, in a battle for economic survival, needed to increase her exports ti foreign lands? The problems run a full range, including the tragicomic. •A huge oil tanker burst off her shores and forced the nation to man her beaches, unsuccessfully this time, against a giant oil slick. Already on austerity, some British had to forego swimming as well. And in the midst of her economic problems came the worst outbreak in history of foot and mouth disease, forcing the slaughter and burial of thousands of cattle, pigs, goats and sheep, a real setback for a nation already on austerity. Who can say also, in this age of growing nationalism, that the demands by Scots and Welsh for more home rule are nothing but a humorous sidelight to history? Perhaps a growing domestic problem has been added to all the others. Even when determinedly face to face with her problems, willing to fight and solve them if possible, the apparent solutions sometimes have. wound themselves in a dilemma. Consider the export-import situation. In order to escape from her balance of payments problems—in order to increase her exports—Britain concluded that she would have to force her economy into expansion. But, being a nation largely dependent on raw materials from abroad, she found also that as her production increased her imports, of all things, rose almost in proportion. And so she has had to slow down again and again. Once the sun never set, and i» forth. Now it is very, very foggy and summer is a very long time away. Declining Diseases Whooping cough and oilier infectious diseases of children, such as diphtheria and scarlet fever, are declining rapidly in the United States. In 1900, for every 100,000 children under 15, 243 died of these diseases; today, the rate is about one In every 100,000, according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica. MOON COUPE is shown being tested on moonlike terrain in northern Arizona, and may be adapted for use in first exploratory expeditions on the moon itself. Developed by the U.s: Geological Survey at Flagstaff, it is equipped with simple stick controls, made as simply as possible for easier operating by someone in a pressurized space suit. Make It a Jolly Christmas for the Entire Family by Giving Them a New UtS AND HER styles are shown by these students at a ; recently-opened Paris school for models. The garments • arc designed to straighten the posture and correct th« 'walk. Weights carried by hand and on Ue bead arc added Incentive* to correct carriage. FRQNT-LOA&lG PORTABLE Washes clean with exclusive Filter-Stream* Full-size revolving spray arm • High pressure jet water action • Washes 15 NEMA table settings clean • Easy- rolling random-loading racks • Automatic detergent dispenser • Self-cleaning filter • Portable today or may be installed as an undercounter. 'imfc. HUBBARD & HOKE 407 W. Main APPLIANCES PERMANENTLY-PRESSED DOCOMA® SHIRTS OF 650/0 DACRON® & 35°/o COTTON WHISKS-AWAY SPOTS AND STAINS IN ONE HOME LAUNDERING! Manhattan* Zip-Clean Docoma* shirts keeps a man neat and smooth ... throughout the holiday happenings! Keeps his wife cool and collected* Docoma is permanently-pressed and and never needs ironing! But that's not all.- Docoma, with the amazing Zip-Clean "soil-release" finish, removes common stains such as gravy, salad-oil; wine, coffee, and those stubborn soil rings around collars and cuffs... in one home laundering! Machine wash and dry and it's ready to wear... spotless, smooth and wrinkle-free! What a great care-free companion for both of you! MARTIN'S THE STORE FOR MEN AND BOYS

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