Northwest Herald from Woodstock, Illinois on July 18, 2000 · Page 23
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Northwest Herald from Woodstock, Illinois · Page 23

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Woodstock, Illinois
Issue Date:
Tuesday, July 18, 2000
Page:
Page 23
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y tt Section D : Troon Bmrcc CAHFINIIKSVUC The village board meets at 7:30 p.m. today in the board room ot village hall, 1200 L.W. Besinger Drive. , CaRY! The District 26 school board's Sites and Facilities Committee meets at 6 p.m. today at the administrative center, 400 Haber Drive. The village board meets at 7 p.m. today at the village hall, 655 Village Hall Drive. . Fax River Grove The library board meets at 8 p.m. today at the library, 306 Lincoln Ave. Harvard: The city council meets at 7 p.m. today at city hall, 20t W. Front St. Huntley: The Fire Protection District meets at 5:30 p.m. today at the village annex building, 11221 Huntley-Dundee Road. JONNSBURC: The village board meets at 7:30 p.m. today at village had, 1515 Channel Beach Ave. LAKEMOOK The park advisory board meets at 7 p.m. today at village hall, 234 W. Rand Road. The board will discuss this year's Lake-moorfest, scheduled for Aug. 12-13. MCHENRY: The McHenry Library Board of Trustees meets at 7 p.m. today at the library, 809 Front St. The board will review its lease agreement with the Friends In Service Here Food Pantry is expected to approve a tentative appropriations ordinance for fiscal year 2000-01. The District 156 school board meets at 7:30 p.m. today at West Campus modular classroom'M3, 4724 W. Crystal Lake Road. The board will accept a donation of 27 years of National Geographic magazines from Donald Jensen. IIcHenry County: The Local Emergency' Planning Committee meets at 2 p.m. today at the McHenry County Government Center, 2200 N. Seminary Ave. The county board meets at 7 p.m. today at the McHenry County Government Center, 2200 N. Seminary Ave., Woodstock. POPLAR COVB The District 200 school board meets at 6:30 p.m. today at North Boone Elementary School, 6200 N. Boone School Road. - -PRAiRK GROVES The District 46 school board meets at 7 p.m. today at Prairie Grove Elementary School, 3225 Route 176. . , RMGWOOK The McHenry County Conservation District Trail, Site Development, Education and Community Relations advisory committees meets jointly at 7:30 p.m. today at Wiedrich Education Center, 6512 Harts Road. " $FOG GROVE The village board meets at 7 p.m. today at village hall, 7401 Meyer Road. I - Woodstock: The city council meets at 7 p.m. today at city hall, 121 W. Calhoun St. : Harvard: The District so Public Relations Committee meets at 9 a.m. Wednesday at the board office, 1101 N. Jefferson St. iyf l .0 111,1 r 111 ' - . V"Vi Chris Birks The Northwest Herald Brianna Viktora, 9, of Marengo, Is certain she has the right answer to a Harry Potter trivia question during Monday's Harry Potter Party at the Marengo library. ocus-pocus focus Harry Potter fans gather for a magical party H By LEE ANN GILL Herald News Service MARENGO It wasn't quite the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry. But a group of young would-be Harry Potters ate beans made of fungus, dazzled each other with Harry facts and concocted their own magic wands to perform transfigurations, stir up spellbinding potions or engage in invincible duels. The Marengo Library's first Harry Potter Party brought together fans of the novels by J.K. Rowling. Perhaps the biggest fan was library Director Elizabeth Riak. "I've read all four books," "So many parents read them to their children. Any book that can get children and adults reading together, in my mind, is a good book." Elizabeth Riak Marengo Library director she said, admitting she recently stayed up until 1 a.m. to finish the latest book, "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire." The novels, about the trials of a 14-year-old wizard and his friends, have brought families together to read, Riak said. "The whole Harry Potter phenomenon - they're good stories. So many parents read them to their children," she said. "Any book that can get children and adults reading together, in my mind, is a good book." Wearing a black-and-gold wizard-like "sorting hat" - a key item in the Harry books - Riak played "Jeopardy" with the group using facts known only by those who read the novels. "When I called Professor Dumbledore (of Hogwarts School) to see if we could use his hat, he said 'no' because school was starting," Riak told the group. See HOCUS-POCUS, page 2 Famfes (Dm woftflii ol Bfloft to poTOiioto Florida official says Von Huben, Howell parents understand move By VICKY WEDIG The Northwest Herald WOODSTOCK The families of Wendy Von Huben and Jesse Lee Howell accept that the teenagers' suspected killer will not be prosecuted, officials said Monday. The so-called railroad killer, Angel Maturino Rcsendiz, 39, is the suspect in the murder of Howell, 19. and Von Huben, 16. Police believe remains found Saturday near railroad tracks in Florida are those of Von Huben, who has been missing since 1997. Information from Resendiz led authorities to the buried remains. Howell's body already had been recovered. Resendiz, who is on death row in Texas for the 1998 rape and murder of a Houston-area doctor, was granted immunity in the Florida killings before providing police with the information. "The state attorney's office made contact with the families to get their blessing on what was taking place as far as giving him immunity," said Maj. Patti Lumpkin, supervisor of the Marion County (Flar.) major crimes unit. "The reason for that was we ' . -I HOWELL VON HUBEN wanted the families to feel comfortable with what was necessary to try to locate the remains, and! they understood that the immunity would mean there would be no prosecution." Laura and William Von Huben, now of Lake Bluff, could not be reached Monday. The Von Hubens lived in Woodstock when Wendy Von Huben' disappeared with her boyfriend, Howell. Von Huben's older sister, Elsa, said her parents left to "spend a few days alone and calm down and deal with the situation." Howell's parents, Becky and David Howell, who now hve in California, were unavailable for comment. See VON HUBEN, page 2 MCC board approves November referendum Voter support could mean fewer staff vacancies By NIKA SCHULTE Herald News Service CRYSTAL LAKE Voters in November will see another referendum from McHenry County College. The referendum, which appeared on the March 21 ballot, will ask voters to keep . the 34 cents per $100 of equalized assessed value rate the same. Before the, board unanimously approved the request Monday, MCC President Dan La Vista reviewed the steps the college has taken since the March referendum failed by more than 2,000 votes. La Vista said the college has increased tuition and technology fees, reduced summer and fall class offerings and eliminated three LaVISTA administrative positions. "We hope the message (to voters) is that we are tightening our belt, and the needs that remain are compelling," La Vista said. If the referendum, is approved, it is projected that the owner of a $150,000 home would pay $167 to the college, based or 2000 assessments. The rate is similar to what they currently pay. If the referendum fails, the same homeowner would pay $142 because the college will finish paying $7.2 million in bond debt in December. " La Vista said the board did not want to adjust the requested amount because the needs of the college were assessed at that value. "We are of the opinion that the community expects the board to request a number that's appropriate - a number that is not to be gouged and a number not to supply less than required," he said. See MCC, page 2 Huntley lab has formula for success By OWEN R. BRUGH The Northwest Herald UNTLEY Students at Huntley Middle School will become engineers, radio broadcasters and weather forecasters, thanks to the school's new technology lab. : .The $150,000 lab includes IS career stations with simulators. ;- fias will really broaden their horizons, and hopefully, it will plant a spark for the future,'' Principal Terry Awrey said. "This brings to life what they learn every day in the classroom. The academic work they are doing comes together here." . 'At the bridge and tower station, students will create and test their designs for strength. Students at the aerodynamics station will build and race miniature cars. Video broadcasting students will record and edit tapes to simulate broadcasts. . Each station's computer will update "Just l&e in a real working environment, you dent get to pick your co-workars," " s Terry Awrey Huntley ISddb School principal the students daily about how they are doing on the projects. . ':' . j , . . The room will not feature a traditional teacher. Instead, a facilitator will guide students to answers in reference books and computer programs available at each station. Soft music will be piped into the room to simulate a professional setting, and each student will work with a partner randomly selected by a computer. "Just like in a real working environment, you don't get to pick your co workers," Awrey said. "The idea is to get the kids working cooperatively.'' Students will be enrolled in the class for one grading quarter each year. They will rotate through four stations each quarter, so by the time they leave the school, they will have worked at 12 of the IS stations. Awrey said he also would like to create an after-school club so interested students can try out other stations or work more in the subjects they find interesting. "We've already had adults who have asked for a chance to get in here and work with these programs,'' Awrey said. . Awrey hopes that as the school expands, more stations will be added. About 60 subjects are available. - "When they are exposed to what the real world has to offer, they can connect it to what they are learning in the classroom," he said. "There are so many different things we could offer." , Kurt FatBc The Norftxmsi Herald, Huntley Middle School principal Terry Awrey leads a tour of the new modular tecr ; nology lab that Includes 15 computer work stations for students.

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