Northwest Herald from Woodstock, Illinois on May 21, 1997 · Page 6
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Northwest Herald from Woodstock, Illinois · Page 6

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Woodstock, Illinois
Issue Date:
Wednesday, May 21, 1997
Page:
Page 6
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Complete report in Sports PLEASANT ft l- I 0 L HIGH OF 66 I V Details, 10A 1 I VV;vl - V vv' II " '; 1 "I Shannon Passaglia and Cary-Grove's SLwing Ghoir walked away big winners at the Nashville Music Festival. COMMUNITY, 1C H'h,ir?Armmf!ttti)Mii!rS WEDNESDAY BRIEFING 7 m, .. ", SCOTT FURSTENAU SPORTS Stars shine at BNC , Harvard's Scott Furste nau cleared 1 2 feet in the pole vault at the Big Northern Conference Boys Track and Feet Meet. Fifth-place Harvard was led by two second-place finishes from Zac O'Brien and sixth-' place Marengo got a first- : place finish from B.J. " ' Gieseke. ' PAGE IB 4 BUSINESS Dominick's opens doors A new Dominick's Finer Foods store opened Tuesday in Lake in-the Hills with entertainment and a long line of,, customers. PAGE ID INDEX Advice ...... 4E Business 1-8D Calendar 2C Classified 1-12F Comics : 5E Community 1-lOC Lottery 2A Movies 2E Obituaries 4C Opinion 8 A Sports ' 1-8B Style 1-6E Weather 10A 1997 Northwest Newspapers, Inc. Vol. 12 -Issue 141 . 98213"00001 Woodstock may or wants residents 9 help By CRAIG WOKER The Northwest Herald WOODSTOCK With eight positions open on the city's boards and commissions, municipal officials said it is a good time for people to get involved and help the town. "That's what we hope for." Mayor Alan Cornue said. "It's through the participation of all these people and volunteerism that we keep things running. They participate ... and from the council's viewpoint we get a broader view through their recommendations and all their different ideas." A slot is open on each of the following: the Historic Preservation Commission, the library board, the Parks and Recreation Commission, the Plan Commission, the Site Plan Review Commission and the zonipg board of appeals. Two positions areavailable on the Cultural Diversity Commission. Most of the appointments run three to five years and some have certain residency or professional requirements, Cornue said. Interested parties should call the mayor's office at (815) 3384302 as soon as possible to apply, said Mary Lynn Lisk, the mayor's office manager. "It's a great way to get started," Lisk said. "It's a great way to help out if you always wanted to do something but don't want to run for office' Some of the panels, such as the Historic Preservation Commission, have special requirements. The members must be a representative of real estate, construction or engineering. "We're very fortunate because we've got a good number of people trained as engineers and architects in the past who really helped us out in an assortment of areas where we needed them," Lisk said. Cornue encouraged people to apply as soon as possible. He said he hoped to receive a wide base of applications and viewpoints from which to draw. After the applications are received, Cornue will make recommendations to the city council. They must approve the recommendations before nominees can take office. The numerous positions are open because the terms expired April 30. y "v '"f I C f 1 r - V liW ft ioiid By STEPHANIE McCLELLAND The Northwest Herald 'ut f. 1 mi il I John Starks The Northwest Herald Elgin Police Chief Charles Gruber addresses the media at Tuesday's news conference. UNION As Brittany Martinez's family mourns, investigators are intensifying their search for the young girl's killer. Police spent Tuesday searching the Kishwaukee River in rural McHenry County near jC Union where the 11 -year-old's body was found Saturday night on a sandbar. They were seeking clues about who may have murdered the girl who had been missing for 10 days, disappearing May 8 from her family's westside Elgin John Starks The Northwest Herald home about 18 miles away. A bouquet of spring flowers was left on the sign of Siems See BRITTANY, page 2 Memorial Park near Union. -" Sightings give new hope for Von Huben VON HUBEN By CRAIG WOKER The Northwest Herald A girl matching the description of a missing 16-year-old Woodstock girl has been spotted at least twice around Jacksonville, Fla., once with a homeless man and again with shock rock groupies. Wendy Von Huben has been missing since Feb. 26, when she hopped in a car with her fiance, Jesse Lee Howell, 19, and two other McHenry County teenagers bound for Florida. Howell was found March 23, murdered by the side of some railroad tracks south of Ocala, Fla., about 60 miles northwest of Orlando. He suffered a blow to the head after fighting his attacker. The two other teenagers, Bryon Carlson, 18, and Melissa Henning, 16, have returned home. Both couples started out the road trip together but separated about March 7 when Carlson and Henning wanted to head for Carlson's grandmother's house and the sun and fun of Fort Myers. Howell and Von Huben didn't like the idea so the couples split up. Police believe Howell and Von Huben lived as transients in the Tampa-Bradenton area before deciding it wasn't the life for them. On March 21, Howell called his father in Woodstock and told him that he and and Von Huben planned to return home after hitchhiking to Raleigh, N.C., to see his grandparents. It was the last time either teenager was heard from. A railroad conductor spotted Howell's body two days later by the side of some railroad tracks. But Florida police recently learned through a caller identification box that someone called an acquaintance of Von Huben from a pay phone at a Baldwin, Fla., truck stop the same weekend Howell's body was found. See VON HUBEN, page 2 Budget plan gets bipartisan backing By ALAN FRAM The Associated Press WASHINGTON The House moved toward stamping its bipartisan approval Tuesday on an outline of the budget-balancing deal between President Clinton and legislative leaders. It was the first show of sentiment by either chamber of Congress on the agreement. Debate proceeded against a backdrop smacking of presidential politics. House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt, D-Mo., a possible White House contender in 2000, split with the administration and said he would oppose the deal. He argued it bore favorable treatment for the rich that would help produce "a deficit of principle, a deficit of fairness." Support seemed overwhelming for the plan, which promises to eliminate deficits by "This is an honest fiscal blueprint. If this fiscal conservative is standing here teSlng you this, I think you can believe ft." U.S. Rep. Gerald Solomon R-N.Y. 2002 while cutting taxes for many families, investors and college students. Even so, top lawmakers were nervous about the first serious attempt to alter the package: a high-pressure effort by leaders of the House Transportation Committee to add $12 billion to the"125 billion already planned for road-building through 2002. To find the extra money, Rep. Bud Shus-ter, R-Pa., the committee chairman, and senior Democrat James Oberstar of Minnesota were seeking to cut defense spending by $6 billion over five years and domestic programs by $5 billion, and shrink proposed tax reductions by nearly $1 billion. "This is an honest fiscal blueprint," said Rep. Gerald Solomon, R-N.Y. "If this fiscal conservative is standing here telling you this, I think you can believe it." The pact is aimed at ehminating deficits by trimming Medicare and giving defense and hundreds of domestic programs billions less than they would need to stay abreast of inflation. But thanks to projections that the robust economy will keep torrents of revenue gushing into government coffers, there are prizes for both parties, too. It would provide extra money for Pell grants for low-income college students, children's health care, the environment and other programs Clinton favors. I Z if Vi tr-vc v . j AP photo Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, R-Miss., greets reporters after meeting with President Clinton Tuesday in budget talks. 9

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