The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 4, 1950 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, April 4, 1950
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Page 5
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TUESDAY, APRIL4, HAL BOYLE'S COLUMN Smaller Houses Cut Fun o/ the Family Cominq Events Social Calendar The Tuesday Alpha Beta Chapter of By Hal Boylo * NEW YORK — <fj— Families and houses are getting smaller today. Drive through the suburbs ot any city and you can see many 8-to-12 rooms homes of 50 to 75 years ago standing boarded up and empty. Some have been turned Into du- JjBexes or triplexes. And still others ™e being torn down to make way for new real estate developments with names like quagmire heights or [ar flung hills. I hate to see these fine old houses die. It Is like watching a kindly elephant go down. Archltc- turally, with their sprawling porches and gingerbread wooden trims, they may have been monstrosities. But they had a virtue above ordinary art^-they were lived In, and well-lived in,. by sprawling happy families. Whatever they lacked in beauty as ' houses, thye made up for in the love they held as homes. Houses Become Cells The smaller, close-packed dwellings that are replacing them have many more conveniences. They do look neater, too, and they have gadgets in them no one even dreamed of in 1900. But they also often have the monotonous look ot a row of cells In. a beehive. ' The idea used to be to build houses far enough apart so that each family would have some privacy, a lawn and a backyard with space to raise a few- chickens in. Now a lot of folks appear to be uneasy unless their houses are close enough for them to hear what the neighbors are calling each other—or .listening to on the radio.' And without getting maudlin a- 'bout it, I sometimes feel sorry for these small families living in their small and sanitary houses.:I guess R is progress, and you can't fight ress; but I can't for' the life „„ rte see just what the progress • mn phl meets at Hotel Noble at 2:amounts to. , ™,, p ;, m -. Mrs - .•>• N. Day and Mrs. Epsllon Sigma Alpha sorority meets with Miss Alma Cain at 8 p. m. Mrs. Randall Hawks and Mrs. James Jordon hostesse to the Alpha Alpha Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi at the T. I. Seay home on Chickasawba at 7:30 p.m. . ,• Y. M Birthday Club meets with Mrs. Preston Goff at 7 p.m. ; Wednesday Lutheran Women's Guild meets with Mrs. George McLeod at 8 p.m. Club Eight meets with Mrs. Graham Sudbury a Mrs. Jack Marsh hostfSs to Alpha Beta Bunoo Club. Thursday Senior Memorial plays at high school auditorium at 8:30 p. in. Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Edwards and Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Crawford entertains Dell Supper Club, Mrs. Bill Gllbow hostess to Avalon Bunco Club. Mrs. j. A. Saliba entertains Thursday Night Club. Thursday Rook meets with Mrs Richard Pritchard. Mrs." Russell Rlales hostess to Blvtlieville Rook Club: Mrs. Alex Curtis entertains Kibitzer club. Double Four Bridge Club meets with Mrs. Ai'zzi Henry. Duplicate Bridge League meets at Hotel Nobel at 8 p.m. Nu Phi Mu sorority meets at home of Miss Jane Shelton, 1S20 W. Walnut at 7 p.m. Friday Chapter "N" of PEO meets with Mrs. L. E. Old at 2 p.m. .Alpha Delta Chapter of Beta Sig- Kids Had Fun at Home The two-kid families in the better-built mouset'rap of today have no Idea what fun it was to one of half a dozen to a dozen children In one of those big old rambling barns people used to call home. There was plenty of,room to play, ; Indoors and out. The two. rooms where the family gathered moat often were the kitchen and "the, dining room. The dining room also :was where dad held court. During :the evening meal he would rule on all the day's infractions of tribal laws, with mother acting alternately as plantlff and attorney for the defense, and decide on punishment. •If It was a good meal, however, he tended to be lenient. In those old houses there was ' slways a room In which a heart- i'broken culprit could go and cry *by himself.. But in large ..families, -'no matter, how means a thing,you'd [done, you £ere,- n«ver completely ne. There' was-'always a sister brother to take, your' side. Feuds During Day - There were plenty of feuds Curing the day, but generally they were all settled by bedtime. .It wasn't often anyone went-to-sleep mad. That was one of'the best things about large families—people learned to get along, to sacrifice for each other, to recognize one another's rights. In big homes and big families there was no room for real selfishness. But there was endless room for loyalty and love and the development of understanding. There were unpleasant "duties—I don't think anyone ever wrote a poem on the . pleasures of carrying out ashes from a coal furnace—but the duties were shared. Every thing was shared; everybody felt necessary. •• . I was brought up In a large house as one of a large family, perhaps it is because of this that, living in a city apartment as I do now and having no children, looking back makes the other way of life seem better. It never was lonely. RITZ THEATRE Manila, Ark. l.asl Time Tcxtav "MASSACRE RIVER" with Gnj- Mnriison : and Rnry Calhoun Warner News & Short Bill Hyndman hostesses., Mrs. J O. Huey entertains Lucky Rook Club. , • Sunday , Easter Egg hunt for children of members of the Country Club at the club at 3:30 p.m., rain or shine. Livestock NATIONAL STOCKYARDS 111 April 4. (iPt— (USDA)—Hogs 10.000; fairly active; weights 180 Ibs up and sows strong to mostly 25 higher than average Monday lighter weights 25 to 50 higher; bulk good and choice 180-240 Ibs 1625-35- top 16.50; 250-300 Ibs largely odd lots 15.25-16.00; ' 140-170 Ibs 13.5015.50; medium and good 100-130 Ib pigs 9.50-13.00; good and choice sows 400 Ibs down 14.25-15.00; heavier sows 13.50-14.25; few down to 13.25; stags 8.50-11,00. Cattle 2500; calves :1600; generally 25 to 50 higher on;steers, heifers and cows; bu!ls nib'stly'SO higher vealers steady; medium and good steers largely 24.50-26.50; one short load 27.00; me ilium and good heifers and mixed yearlings 24.0028,00; common and low medium 20.00-23.50; good cows 19.50-21.00; common and medium cows 17.5019.00; canners and cutters mostly 14.00-17^0. Guests Attend Executive Meet Mrs. j. L. Scott of West Memphis, was guest teacher at the meeting of the Executive Board of the Women of the First Presbyterian Church yesterday at 10:30 a.m. at the church. Mrs. G. W. Dillnhunty, president, presided over the meeting with Mrs. Ross Stevens presenting the devotional. A business session was conducted after which luncheon wns served the group. Mrs.--W'.'A. Dobj'ns was chairman of the committee of hostesses. Following the luncheon, Mrs Scott taught the officers training class- Among the visitors attending the meeting was Mrs. L. s. Hartzog president of the Presbyterian women of Slkeston and several women of the Sikeston church. .Mrs. Hartzog formerly made her home in Blytheville., WcdncsdRy & Thursday "TREASURE OF MONTE CPJSTO" -With Glenn l,an£.in and Adele Jergcns News & Shorts Tuesday 'Home in San Antone" With Roy Acuff Wednesday & Thursday "NO MINOR VICES" Dana Andrew* . I.ilH Pitnwr "Movies Are Belter Than Ever" New" Opening Time Box pffice^Opens 7:00 Show,Starts 7:30 SCOUNDRELS IN A CtNHfRT Of INFAMY! Also Co-Hit B LYTHEVILLES ONLY ALL WHITF TMFATDE. Two Big Hits — Open 6:30 June Haver in "SCUDDAHOO SCUDDA HAY" James Cagney '-in "FIGHTING «9H>" BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COURIER NEWS Nails range from 15-inch boat spikes to fine needle-like pins only 3|16th of an inch in length. Powers. Conducted Here Approximately 60 persons attended a painters meeting held last night at the Women's Club by the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co. for dealers here. •The meeting was held to discuss new developments in pnint products. Harold Kricger pf Memphis, color engineer for .the Pittsburgh Plale Glnss Co.. was the principal speaker. Dlythcvillc dealers represented at the meeting were H-ffman Brothers Lumber Co., Mississippi County Lumber Co. and Hubbard Hardware. I. R. Coleman of Blythcville is territory representative for the firm sponsoring the -meeting. Ddegatin-is from Osceola,'Manila and Steclc, Mo., also attended. Canned bceis are delicious In a salad. Save a little'of the beet juice to mix with sour cream for a lovely pink dressing. Arrange the beets on salad greens with slices of'hard- cooked egg and onion; then pass the dressing. Marriage Licenses The following couples have obtained marriage licenses at the office of Miss Elizabeth Blythe, county clerk: Dewltt T. James, Jr.. and Miss Georgia Ann Brunner, both of Poca- hon las. 1 Ray Moses and Mrs. Josephine Mormo'y. both of Dell. ' Hunter Lane Kimbro of .loncs- boro and Miss Lon Jo Hargctt of nWhcvllle. Mllbiirn Dvncan and Miss Juanita Taylor, both of Stcele, Mo. THE CHIGKASAIVnA DISTRICT OF MISSISSIPPI COUNTY, ARKANSAS. Joe A. Isbell, Plaintiff, vs. No/ 11245 Mabel E. Isbell, Defendant. WARNING ORDER The defendant, Mabel E. Istell, is warned to appear In this court within thirty days and answer the complaint of the plaintiff, Joe A. Isbell. and upon her failure to do so said complaint will be taken as confessed. Witness my hand and seal as Clerk of the Chancery Court of the I Chickasawba District of Mississippi P'AIJk County, Arkansas, thta 20th day of March, 1950. ! : • HARVEY MORRIS,' Clerk, By Ruth Magee, D. c. 3|21-28-4[<-ll NOTICKOF ACCOUNTS OF EXKCUTORS AND ADMINISTRATORS FILED Notice Is hereby given that during the month of March, 1850 the following . accounts of Executors and Administrators have been filed , for settlement and confirmation in j the Probate Court for the Chickasawba District of Mlssl'sippl County, Arkansas and that such accounts with their respective filing dates are as follows: No. 1908. Estate of Sam H. William, deceased. First and Phial Settlement of W. L. Taylor, Executor filed March 8, 1050. No. 1937. Estate of R. E. L. Bearden, deceased. Final Settlement of John Bearden, Executor filed March 8, 1950. All persons Interested in the settlement of. any of the above estates are warned to file exceptions thereto, If any have they on or before I he sixtieth day following the filing of the respective accounts, falling which they will be barrcii forever from excepting to the accounts. Witness my hand and seal as slich Clerk th|s tho 3 day of April. 1050. Elizabeth Blythe, County and Probate Clerk EW i!o\ Opens Week Days 7:00 p.m Matinee Saturdays & Sundays nip.(.-Sun. 1 p.m. C'ont. Showinc. A.'enila, Ark. Tuesday . 'FEDERAL AGENTS AT LARGE" with Kent Taylor an ilDorotliy 1'atrick Also Shorts Wednesday & Thursday "TENSION" with Illcti.ird Basehart and Audrey Tolier Also Shorts Beneath the breath-taking beauty of this new modern CELEBRATION SUITE is the famous 5-STAR CONSf RUCTION. Double layers of resilient springs in both seat and back.are fastened together and.held in permanent balance by hardwood frames Ex- Pmc^,r tailored in DEEp -PiLE MOHAIR HRIEZE, in your'choice of the season's newest colors. See it today! v D&SON FURNITURE 5133—12 to 18 Pink, Maize, Pastel Green 95 new surface interest • EMBOSSED COTTON i '-,'.'.' i Wrinkle Resistant Something,new...a crisp, embossed cotton. Something prelly...v,'ith picture frame collar and deep, culTecl pockets...a la Paris. Wrinkle resistant, valtdyed colors, shrinkage controlled. So much quality for so little a prical "T.N.T."— Tucked V Tidy arri pretty as a picture, this Judy liontl has a slar-bnghL future. The bib is rounded —neatly lucked, demurely buttoned. And big style feature is the liny collar that stands up in back. (Here's a ^natural" for suits, perfection itself for "separate" skirts). Of washable Crepe Nylcne (acefale and nylon) in, balloon-bright colors. Sizes 32:38. New Group of Mitzi Dresses just Arrived for Easter Selling Sizes 6 Mo. to 18 Mo. — Sizes 1-3 Sizes 4 to 6x — - Sizes 7-12 1.98 to 3.98

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