The Paris News from Paris, Texas on March 16, 1985 · Page 7
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March 16, 1985

The Paris News from Paris, Texas · Page 7

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Paris, Texas
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Saturday, March 16, 1985
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Page 7
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Th* Part* News. Sat., March 16, IMS 7 Business SLEEK AND SLIM - The POPCOM XlOO modem from Prentice Corp. has no lights or switches and has a modern design meant to 1 plugged in and forgotten about. Megabytes By Bill Lamb Small, slim modem designed to be plugged in permanently Modems are modems, sort of like spoons are spoons. They may look a bit different, but they all, for the most part, perform the same task with equal ability. • The POPCOM XlOO, however, tends to stand out from the crowd. If you like blinking lights identified by cryptic initials you really don't understand, the XlOO is not for you. It has no lights. That's the first hint of theXiOO's main selling point: You plug it into the wall; you plug the phone line into the XlOO; you plug your computer into the XlOO; you use it and forget the modem is physically around. The modem is designed to be permanently plugged into a wall socket by way of a rotating plug. In fact, the only physical control on the modem is the volume contro} for the internal speaker. It's sleek, slim and dowmright stylish for a piece of electronic equipment that, once put-into operation, can easily be forgotten about. A. few on-screen commands set 19 different operating parameters for the XlOO. Some of the XlOO's features include: ^ Automatic or manual dialing or answering for voice and data calls. ^ A set of signals that lets the user know that the modem has been properly attached to the wall, phone and computer. The XlOO actually plays a little tune as each connection is made, acknowledging that the connection is a good one. *- It can be used for voice or data. If both ends of a connection are operating with POPCOM devices, the user only has to pick up the telephone attached to the modem and start talking. When the POPCOM on the other end loses the data signal, it switches automatically to its internal speaker, allowing the user there to pick up his phone and start talking. When one user replaces the phone, the XlOO automatically tries to establish data communications again, unless told to carry out a different command. * The modem remembers when you forget. If you forget to hang up after finishing a data call, the XlOO will hang up automatically in 30 seconds, possibly saving some expensive long-distance calls. The XlOO will work with almost any popular communications software, such as PC Modem, Crosstalk and Smartcom II and makes use of all the modem's capabilities. To use the XlOO, you need a computer with an RS232C serial port (the XlOO will automatically adapt to almost any RS232C cable); a standard dial- up telephone line; a standard single-line or multibut- ton telephone (for voice features); and supporting communications software. The XlOO's specifications include: full duplex; data rates of 300 or 1,200 bps; automatic, touch-tone or rotary dialing; and a 40-character command line buffer. For its price and characteristics, the POPCOM XlOO is a step ahead of the pack, as far as modems are concerned. The XlOO is a product of the Prentice Corp., 266 Caspian Drive, Sunnyvale, Calif., 94088. Its suggested retail price is $475. Infringement suit filed BPI Systems Inc. — makers of General Accounting, featured in Megabytes March 9 — has filed suit against KWIK-KOPY Corp. of Houston. The suit, filed in an Austin federal court, alleges that KWIK-KOPY has illegally copied and distributed two of BPI's financial programs. According to a news release issued by BPI, the suit alleges that KWIK-KOPY, since 1981, has required its estimated 900 franchisees to purchase from KWIK-KOPY General Ledger and Accounts Receivable software for Apple computers, which are pirated versions of BPI software. BPI also claims that two changes were made to the software to disguise the copying. They include deletion of BPI's copyright notices from the program and the manual and the deletion of software instructions that tells computers to check for the presence of BPI's copy protection device. The suit asks for actual damages up to $711,000 and punitive damages of $1 million. "BPI asserts that the award for punitive damages is necessary in order to deter KWIK-KOPY and other users of computer software from future infringements and to stem the increasing tide of infringements which plague the software industry," the news release stated. KWIK-KOPY Vice President Steve Hammerstein this week charged BPI with attempting to try the case in the media, "and we're not about to do that. We're not really pleased with BPI's approach to this," he added. Hammerstein declined to comment further on the case. """ Cities, hotels, seek conventions LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP) - Walt Disney World brought Mickey Mouse, Los Angeles produced Mae West and W.C. Fields look-alikes and Puerto Rico served up pina coladas in a classy castle. They were among 500 exhibitors on hand this week seeking a share of the $30 billion that associations will spend in convention business during the coming year. The exhibitors — ranging from hotels and airlines to convention bureaus and theme parks — turned out to court 3,000 representatives of the Washington, D.C.-based American Society of Association Executives. The millions spent on the five- day gathering bolstered the prediction by ASAE President R. William Taylor that associations will be a "major growth area" in the years ahead. "Almost 1,000 new associations are being formed in the United States each year," Taylor said as he paused to look at a replica of the new San Diego Convention Center, sculptured in sand from the Nevada desert. "As government becomes stronger, more people band together. Every time a new industry pops up you've got an association to represent it. The U.S. is just association-oriented." There are now more than 19,000 national associations and "hundreds of thousands of state and local associations," Taylor said. More than 11,500 of the national organizations belong to his ASAE, dubbed the association for associations, which was formed in 1920 with 67 charter members. Taylor estimates ASAE members will spend $19 billion on thousands of conventions in the coming year, with corporate meetings pushing that total to $27 billion. Conventions of smaller groups boost the potential for hotels, airlines and others in the industry well past $30 billion. "ASAE put us on the map," chimed in Helen Suozzi, a representative of the Nashville Convention and Visitors Bureau. Standing in front of a model of the city's sprawling new convention center, she said the 1984 ASAE meeting in Nashville had meant hundreds of millions of dollars in new convention business. The Nashville Opryland Hotel alone secured $270 million in future convention business from the ASAE meeting. Each year associations hold some 227,000 meetings — 88,000 of which are classed as major conventions. The rapid growth in convention spending is reflected in the number of cities establishing their own convention bureaus and convention centers. In 1970 there were 70 members of the International Association of Convention Bureaus. Today there are 160 cities on an ever-growing list. "It's become so competitive," Taylor said of the battle for the convention dollar. "At one time there were maybe 12 convention cities. Now everybody considers itself a convcntiorunty." PARIS ELKS LODGE FRIDAY NIGHT FISH & SHRIMP SATURDAY ST. PATRICK'S DANCE WITH THE PARIS BPO ELKS ^ closing stocks Markets HI LO LAST [CHG1 Anheuser-Busch 76". I— ',il Apple 23M, 22% 1+ 7 AT&T Amfac Archer Daniels 21 (i 26% 201.4 21 W. 26% 20 M, aid 26% 201/4 r 1 [+ ll ) '„] 1*1 Champion Homes City Investing A.G.Edwards Ensearch E-Systems Exxon First City Flowers Goodrich Goodyear GTE InterFirst IBM Int'l Paper J.C. Penney K-Mart Kimberly-Clark Kroger Mary Kay McDermott 3% 3814 31 (4 297d 27% 49% 16 18% 29'* 26% 43% 11% 130 50 48 33M. 4811 401/4 12 27 3M. 38»i 311/4 29 U 271/4 481/4 151/4 18',i '29 M, 26 Mi 43 10'/i 128 49% 47% 321/4 4814 393. "14 26 M, 3% 3S'.i 31 'i 39*, 27'i 4.8 >.; IS',4 181,4 291* 26 M, 43 10'/, 128 49% 47% 32% 48'.b 39'i 11% 26 Mi [+ [ [- 1.4] ) I,H! [+i'i) t— 1- t [- ',il %] 14] 1/4] I- (*) 1+ [- t- [[- [[-1 [- f II- i»J •%] %) *,} 41 M.1 1 <4l ft) %] %I I Manslngwear 19(4 19% 19',4 [+ '/il N.A. Philips 40'4 401* 40'/4 t— Mil Oklahoma Gas 22M, 21% 22 [+ Mil Phillips Pel. 49% 49W, 49Vi 1+ '.*] Pllllbury ' 4814 47 V 4 47% [+ ',»] ParolatorC. 26>/4 X'.', I— Safeway 32% 31% 32*4 1+ '.41 Sears 34% 33% 33% [— ft Sherwin-Williams 32% 31% 31'i [- %] Southland 32% 32>/i 32% [— %] Standard Prod. 22'* 22% [— Mi] . 74',4 74% 74'/4 Tandy 32% 32 32'.!, [+ M,] Texas Inst. 110'., 109% 109% 1+ %]. Tx.N.M. Power 15% 151/4 1514 1+ !*] Texas Utilities 26*4 26", 26'i 1 WalMart 45% 45'.» 45% ( + Westinghonsc 30 30 I Weyerhauser 28% 27% 27% I— ',(,] Zales 29% 28% 28% I- 'il Courtesy of Prudential-Bache Securities. 1849 l.amar Ave.. 785-7521. Mortgage Rates CHICAGO (AP) — Average mortgage rates for single-family homes in 14 metropolitan areas as of Mar. 13, as compiled by the Chicago Title Insurance Co. The rates are for 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages for 80 percent of the value of the house. A point is a onetime fee equaling one percent of the mortgage. Mar. 13 Prev. wk percent+points Atlanta Boston Chicago Dallas Denver Houston Los Angeles Minneapolis New York Philadelphia Phoenix Seattle Tampa Washington 13.00 + 3.0 13.00 + 3.0 13.00 + 4.0 1J.T5 + 2.0 12.875+ 3.5 13.00 + 3.0 13.375+ 2.0 13.00 + 3.0 13.50 + 3.0 13.25 + 3.0 13.25 + 3.0 13.00 + 2.0 13.00 + 3.0 13.00 + 3.0 13.00 + 2.0 13.00 + 2.0 13.00 + 3.0 12.75 + 2.0 12.875+ 2.5 12.75 + 4.0 13.375+ 2.0 13.00 + 2.0 13.50 + 3.0 13.00 + 3.0 I3.2S + 3.0 13.00 + 2.0 13.00 + 3.0 13.00 + 3.0 CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago Title Insurance Co.'s average of variable rates available in the above cities for a new 1-year adjustable mortgage, based on a 30-year loan for 80 percent of the value of a single-family house. Mar. 13 Prev. Wk percent+points Average 10.50 + 2.0 10.50 + 2.0 Metals NEW YORK (API — Spol nonterroul metal prices Friday: Aluminum * U.50 cents per pound. NY Comex spot month closed Thu. Copper • MH-M cents a pound, U.S. destinations. Copper - 59,00 cents per pound, NY Come* spot month closed Thu. Lead - 17-21 cents 9 pound. Zinc - 45 cents a pound, delivered. Tin - IS.5733 Metals Week composite Ib. Gold • $797.70 per ounce Handy & Har- man (only daily quote). Gold • (291.00 per troy ounce. NY Comex spot month closed Thu. Silver - IS. *M per ounce Handy A Har- man. Silver • S5.6M per troy ounce, NY Comex spot month closed The. Mercury - $310.00-1319.00 per 74 Ib flask. New York. Platinum - $?4«.oo-$?so.oo domestic mer chant troy otmce, N.r. OMAHA, Neb. (APHUSDA) — Omalta Livestock Market quotations Friday: Hogs: 1800; barrows and gilts 220-270 IBS steady to 50 lower; other weights steady to 50 higher; fairly active after slow opening; U.S. 1-3 200-240 10s 44.00- 44.75; U.S. 2-4 340-310 IDs 43.00-44.00; U.S. 3-4 300 400 IDS ]«. 50-39. 00; SOWS under 4SO IbS If to 1.00 lower; over 450 IbS steady; U S 1-2 300-450 IbS 37.50-39.50; U S 1-3 450- HO Ibs 39.50-44.00. Cattle and Calves: 100; not enough of any class to establish a market test. Sheep: None. MEMPHIS (AP) — Friday's base price cotton quotation for strict low middling 1-116 inch at Lubbock was 55.95 cents per pound. KANSAS CITY (AP) - Wheat futures on the Kansas City Board of Trade Friday: Open High Low Settle Chg. WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum; dollars per bushel Mar 3 . 54 % 3 . 55 3 - 5 4 Vi 3 . 5 5 +.01% May 3.43 3.45 3.43 3.44U+.02V4 Jul 3.32%3.34 3.32% 3.33 + .OOV4 Sep 3.35'A 3.34V« 3.35'/i 3.35W +.OSV. Dec 3.44 3.44V* 3. 44 3.44V4+.OOV4 Mar .35 .35 .35 .35 ...... Prev. sales 1,265. Prev day's open int 15,278, up S3, CHICAGO (AP) — Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Friday: Open High Low Last Chg. WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum; dollars per bushe) .0»V> .OOV4 .t»Vt .« 0 Vi .OOW May J.74 2.74* 2.73'A 2.74 — Jul 2.7SV4 2.75V4 2.741/i. 2.7SV4 + Sep 2.47 2.41 2.««H» 2.47V4 + D«C 2.41V,!.4! 2.41 2.42 + Mar 2.70 2.7014 2.«»V4 J.70K, + May 1.7514 J.74.14 2.7J1* J.7«V» Prev. sales 25,100. Prev day's open Int 114,032. OATS 5,000 bu minimum; dollars per bushel Mar 1.7BV4 1.71% 1.7«'/4 1.7414—.OlVi May 1.72V4 1.72% 1.71 1.7114—.0014 Jul l.fl 1.41 1.4414 1.44W — .01 Sep 1.43 1.43 1.42V4 1.4JV4 — .00*» Dec 1.44 1.44 1.44 1.44 Prev. sales 500. Prev day's open inl 3,522, up 3. SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum; dollars per bushel 5.15 5.17 S.I4 5.»1'A S.t«tt S.«0 6.01 6.03 S.It 4.02 4. 04V, 4. 02 Mar May Jul AU9 Sep Nov Jan Mar May I Prev. sales 20,000. Prev day's open int 47,437, up 2,413 .«4Vi + .91V, -t- OIK + .02V3+ .02 .OI!4 .021* .03V. S.tl 6.10 6.20 4.20Vi4.1» Mar May Jul Sep Dec Mar 3.55 3.56 3.45 3.45 3.301*].)] 3.30</i 3. 32 3.4014 3. 47» 3 . 5 3 V. 3 . 5 6 +.05 3.43 3 . 4 4 Vj + . 0 3 1« 3.30 3 . 3 I *i + .92 </4 3 . 30 "A 3 . 32 +.02 3.4016 3. 42ii +.01«4 r 3.4«</4 3.48V, 3.46V. 3.4SI/, +.02Vi Prev. sales 8,000. Prev day's open int 34,799. CORN 5,000 bu minimum; dollars per bushel Mar 2.73% 2.7314 2. 7t'/j 3. 7J — .0014 • i L, RAIN GUTTERS FREE ESTIMATES '• Contlnous aluminum guttetlng . Prv-palntcd baked <nanwl In I colors • We also repair * clean out gutters . 5" or 6" Box K guttering • Guarantied not to leak « Custom mode to any length CAU MMY WHITAKIH T«s -&tT7144413 It 7I54W W|M< i ************************* * * * * * * * * * * DEAN AND BONNIE JONES Announce the relocation of their offices from FM 195 to: 1O1 LAMAR AVE., PARIS, TEXAS DEAN JONES REAL ESTATE AND TEXAS DETECTIVE AND SECURITY SERVICE Will be open Saturdays and Sunday afternoons to better serve you. Telephone: 785-1348 * * * * * * * * * ************************* NiW CAR FINANCING 12.9 Lamar national Bmfc 200 $. Collegia!* How many of these ways can the Dale Carnegie Course benefit you? The reasons why so many men and women take the Course each year vary from improving their ability in getting along better with others to building self-confidence and acquiring more poise. During the Course you gain a better understanding of what motivates people—including yourself. Among the many additional benefits of the Dale Carnegie Course are: • New effectiveness in communicating ideas to others. • New self-reliance in coping with problems and situations. • New enthusiasm for work and responsibility. • New competence in decision making. • New freedom from boredom and worries. • New success in getting along with others. • New perspectives toward work and family. • New appreciation for others. • New motivation to strive for higher achievements. • New interest in people, knowledge, experience. For more details about the Dale Carnegie Courts and the many benefits it offers you, please call: Barbara Nelson 784-2443 DALE CARNEGIE COURSE Presented By Joe Nicholson & Associates L.O. MAMMONS {SATURDAY ONLY! SPORT SHIRTS SWEATERS Values to S 45. 12.88 I 12.88 SLACKS & JEANS 9.88 SUITS & SPORT COATS im"T J« to I I Of ^mami^mimt^ama^a^amii^i^m^i^i^ — --, — , - . TIES. Values to -22.50 3*88 ODDS-N-ENDS V2 PRICE & LESS """f 1.0. hAMIVIONS J la mar Ave. 785-2113

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