Statesman Journal from Salem, Oregon on August 4, 1985 · Page 45
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Statesman Journal from Salem, Oregon · Page 45

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Salem, Oregon
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Sunday, August 4, 1985
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Page 45
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MAJOR LEAGUE RESULTS Mats 5, Cub 4 Expos 6, Pirat 5 Dodgers 2, Rods 0 Giants 7, Braves 5 Astros 4, Padres 3 Phillies 6, Cardinals 4 Red Sox 3, Royals 4 Yankees 8, White Sox 4 Tigers 9, Brewers 3 Blue Jays 4, Rangers 1 Mariners 6, A'i 2 Indians 1 0, Orioles 4 Angels 5, Twins 4 DETAILS, Page 4E. stocks3-6 Statesman-Journal, Sunday, August 4, 1985 '' "' m.m, I - I" .IJIIIII.IUII. ! HUM I.III.II...I...I...JJI..I..... ....Mil .1,1 ..IIM.,,11. j .Ml. J 1 . I ..I.I. I M.IL. : ' - V.; r li i fall 6-3 Angel rM P' v i ' '-r -A M ; , . .-.--W'-''';um.r---4. 7 4 . . . , . . - Northwest League OREGON DIVISION W L PCI. CB SALEM (Angels) Ml .578 - Bern) (Phillies) S II .543 Vf, Eugene (RoyalJ) 23 23 11 3 Medtord (A s) 22 24 .478 4'A WASHINGTON DIVISION - ' . W L Pet. GB Everett (Giants) 27 It .587 -Bellingham (Mariners) 22 23 .489 41 Spokane (Padres) 19 27 .413 8 Tri-Cuies (Ind.) 18 27 .400 8(4 ' SATURDAY'S GAMES Eugene (, SALEM 1 Bend 10, Medlord 7 " Everett 4, Tri-Cities Bellingham S, Spokane 3 TODAY'S GAMES Eugene at SALEM, I pjn. Bend at Medlord Everett at Tri-Cities Bellingham at Spokane The Eugene Emeralds pounded out 15 hits off of three Salem Angel . pitchers Saturday night to take 6-3 ; Northwest League baseball win' at Chemeketa Community College, w The loss, coupled with Bend's 10-7 win over Medford, dropped Salem's Oregon Division lead to l'2 games over the Phillies. Salem and Eugene will meet tonight at 6 in the final game of a three-game series. According to Eugene manager Frank Funk, his team was more intense at the plate than in Friday's 7-3 loss. "I told them they had to be a lot more aggressive," he said. "You can't be taking called three strikes up there. You have to be swinging the bat." , Eugene came out swinging and took a 5-0 lead, including a four-run third inning. In the fourth, Salem starter Frank DiMichele, 1-5, was forced to leave with a sore elbow. His status is uncertain at this time. Mike Kesler replaced DiMichele, but was tagged for four runs on five hits in 2 innings of work. - Salem, 26-19, was stopped on eight hits by Eugene pitchers Hector Ber-rios, 5-1, and Eric Solberg. Berrios allowed all three runs over six-plus ' innings, before Solberg shut Salem ' down on two hits over the final three innings to earn his first save of the 'year. "Hector pitched well for us, but has a problem of trying to let the "Tbther team back into the game," said Funk. "Tonight he was sailing along and then served up a high pitch for a run and then balked in a - Turn to ANGELS, Page 2E. Keizer advances Statesman-Journal pholo by Gerry Lewin No. 3, was the top female finisher and Rick Groen-endaal was the men's winner. Results, Page 2E. FUN RUNNERS More than 200 runners partici- City 5K fun run through downtown Salem. The run was pated in Saturday's Kaiser Permanente All American part of Salem's Summerfest activities. Peggy Muni, Owners, players fail to make headway sed. "They were not," Fehr said. "Lee (MacPhail) distanced himself rather quickly from his own commissioner yesterday, and we did not address those issues today." Ueberroth, who was at his mid-town Manhattan office, was asked his reaction to statements that his proposals were largely ignored. "I don't want to get into that," Ueberroth said. "I just submitted some proposals, and I told them if they wanted to reject them, that's fine." The commissioner said, however, that he had "reason to be mildly encouraged. I was pleased they were back at the table." Ueberroth refused to answer questions about whether he had the power, by invoking the clause in baseball's charter that he may act in the best interests of the game, to force the the owners to make a settlement. Among Ueberroth's suggestions was one to set aside the strike deadline while the parties negotiated over an escrowed fund of $45 million, the approximate difference between what players want for their pension plan and what owners have been paying. Both sides felt there still was time to avert a strike, although little optimism was offered. The owners' chief bargainer, Lee MacPhail, said "neither side moved" on the major issues blocking an agreement the owners' contribution to player pensions and management's request for player concessions in salary arbitration. While he characterized the situation as a temporary stalemate, he said he was convinced that both sides still were "searching for some new approach." "I wish I could bring you some measure of optimism," said MacPhail, president of the owners' Player Relations Committee. "But I don't see anything in today's (Saturday's) meeting that got us any closer, although I do believe both sides are honestly trying to find solutions. That's about the best thing I can say." MacPhail said none of Ueberroth's "potential solutions" were discussed "as such," but he said a lot of the issues upon which Ueberroth had touched in his Thursday news conference have been covered before. ; "They are things we've been talking about all along," MacPhail said. Don Fehr, acting executive director of the Major League Players Association, also was asked if any of Ueberroth's proposals were discus Major league roundup, Page 4E. NEW YORK (AP) - Ignoring the proposals offered by Commissioner Peter Ueberroth, the two parties in baseball's contract talks resumed bargaining Saturday, but made no headway with two days left before a threatened players' strike. Neither management nor the players association reported any progress from their first bargaining session in three days, and both parties said none of Ueberroth's seven proposals, offered on Friday, was specifically discussed. The next negotiating session was scheduled for noon EDT today. Blazers . , -- . -A V "C s clinch crown final to t f It-, t - . . s: ! P ah VMM UP' J 4 I mil ,A if; -fcr .: I 4 . ' ' . i U "?: . ... v ...... 4 J V ;v ' - ,; 4,.. , f r Statesman-Journal photo by Gerry Lewin MEDFORD Keizer defeated Raleigh Hills 17-1 Saturday night to earn a spot in the championship game of the major Little League baseball state tournament. ' s-'We have never beaten Raleigh Hills in all of the years we've played them in post-season games," said Keizer coach Clint Holland. "I guess the kids had something to prove tonight." The victory avenged a 4-0 loss to Raleigh Hills last Thursday Keizer's only loss in post-season play. Shon Traver hit a solo home run to start the first inning for Raleigh Hills, giving it a 1-0 lead. ; But Keizer answered with one run in the second inning and 11 runs in the third. ; Raleigh Hills used three different pitchers in the third inning, but could not slow the Keizer attack. Brian Herschbach sparked Keizer with a three-run homer in the third, and returned to the plate in the same inning to hit a two-run double. " .Herschbach finished the day going 4 for 5, including the home run and two doubles which produced seven RBIs. Pitcher Bryan Priem went the "distance, striking out seven and allowing one walk. ; Herschbach, who also pitches in the Keizer rotation, will go against Raleigh Hills in the championship game today. ; Holland and team manager Bruce Priem had praise for the Medford community Saturday. "The kids have come to every game rested, enthusiastic and ready to play ball," said Holland. "I believe it has a lot to do with the competitive edge we've kept while we've been down here. These people are great." ? ; Keizer will play at 1 p.m. The winner will advance to the Little League regional tournament in San Bernardino, Calif., later this month. KEIZER 17, RALEIGH HILLS I ' Keizer 01(11) 023-17 13 1 Raleigh Hills 10 0 000- 1 4 1 Priem and Bunch; Morfin. Smith 3, Lachenmeier 3 and Lovtnger, Eiler 3. HR -Traver. RH, 1st, solo. HR .Herschbach, K, 3rd, 2 on By REID ENGLISH Of the Statesman-Journal PORTLAND - Guards Steve Colter and Terry Porter combined for 51 points Saturday night to lead the Portland Trail Blazers to a title-clinching 116-97 victory over the Golden State Warriors before 2,648 fans at the Chiles Center. Portland finished with a 6-1 record in the NBA's Northwest Summer League, while second-place Sacramento dropped to 4-3 after losing the opening game 119-86 to Seattle. The league concludes play here today when Golden State faces Sacramento at 5 p.m., and Portland meets Seattle at 7:15 p.m. As in Portland's previous five wins, it led throughout, paced by its superior quickness. The Blazers took a 30-16 lead with rookie Porter scoring 13 points. Numerous Portland points were set up by the defense, which caused many of Golden State's turnovers. As a result, the Blazers got many fast-break baskets in the opening quarter to set the game's tempo. "I thought our defense was very good, and we played well together," said summer league coach Rick Adelman. "The guards worked so hard, and then the big guys came through in the second half." . Adelman singled out four players as having the most consistant efforts in the league: Ben Coleman, Jerome Kersey, Colter and Porter. Portland led from 10 to 19 points in the second half as Golden State never showed enough consistency to catch the Blazers. The Blazers were most effective when Porter and Colter were in the backcourt with Kersey and Coleman at forward. Colter, who missed the Blazers' only loss, was the most outstanding player on the court. He made 10 of 12 field goals, many on twisting drives to the basket, and added 7 of 8 free throws. Porter was 10 of 15 from the field and 4 of 6 from the line. The two also combined for 11 assists and six steals. "I'm feeling my way into the of-Turn toJILAZERS, Page 2E. Gus Envela of McKay High School waves to the crowd during Saturday's Salem Summerfest parade in Salem. Enyela returns to grass roots Mune, where the majority of his relatives live. "I met my aunt who is the oldest member of our family and she told she never thought she'd see me again," he said. "She said the last time she saw me that I was a baby and now I was a man." Being thought of as an adult by his people was important to Envela. "They treated me as a man and not as a teenager, he said. "It was a real nice feeling. You couldn't help but feel changed somewhat after it." He said the country is not what most Americans envision it to be. "Most stereotype it as jungles and people running around naked," Envela laughed. "It really isn't that different. It may not be as wealthy as here, but it's a functioning country." Envela, 17, felt his trip gave him renewed pride towards his country. "I feel more commitment to my country now," he said. "My country needs me and I hope to help Turn to GUS, Page 2E. Olympics, spent his first day on the island capital city of Malabo. He visited with his country's dignitaries, including president Teodoro Nguena Nbazog. "He and my father (Gus sr.), who was a former ambassador, talked for about 2 hours while my sister, brother (Ted) and I sat listened," he said. "They talked about how the country is trying to get back on its feet after its independence from Spain (1968)." Nbazog became president of Equatorial Guinea six years ago and set up a democratic government in the tiny country of 300,000 people. He replaced his cousin who headed a dictatorship. Envela said the change was an important one for his country's image. "He's trying to change the country's image after a cruel dictatorship," he said. "He's committed to his people and wants the best for them." Envela, who won three individual events at the Class AAA track and field meet the last two years, traveled to the mainland of Batta Rio ByDOUGMcLEAN Of the Statesman-Journal Gus Envela's biggest thrill this summer didn't occur on a track, but rather in a small country on the west coast of Africa. In what could be a scenario taken out of Alex Haley's "Roots," Envela returned home to Equatorial Guinea. Envela, the junior grand marshal in Saturday's Salem Summerfest '85 parade, spent six days in the country he left 16 years ago at the age of one. The experience was a touching one, according to Envela, the state's top prep sprinter. "My sister (Vicki) and I were so anxious to land that we really didn't think about the emotional part of it it to6k us by surprise," he said. "When I stepped out of the plane all these people came running up to me saying, 'you've returned, you've come back.' It sent chills up and down my spine." Envela, a McKay High School senior who represented Equatorial Guinea in the 1984 Summer

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