The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on November 10, 1967 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Friday, November 10, 1967
Page 3
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Wyfhevffle (Ark.) Courier News — Friday, November 10, 19*7— Page Thret Power Companies Jockey to Avoid Blackout Repeat lies, both public and private, to develop plans for cooperation aimed at improving power service and making it more dependable'. By JOHN SRANAHAN Associated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP) - The house lights flicker and the electricity goes off. Generator failure? Possibly, or it could be the power company deliberately pulled the switch to avoid a repetition of 1965's Big Blackout. In the two years since that massive Nov. 9 power failure, which hit eight states and affected 30 million people, the utility companies have been working to keep lights on. But sometimes they have to turn some off to do it. "There's been more or less a universal effort toward load- shedding which sacrifices some customers for a few minutes to save the system," says Paul H. Shore, regional engineer for the Federal Power Commission in New York. • Loadshedding automatically cuts off portions of an electrical I system when the demand on the whole circuit is too great. "It's only temporary," Shore observes. * + * The 1965 Northeast blackout left the inhabitants of 80,000 square miles of the United States and Canada without light for periods of up to 13 hours. People were stranded in skyscrapers, trapped in elevators and immobilized in darkened subway trains. Since then the utilities have taken "a long hard look" at themselves, Shore says. The Consolidated Edison Company which serves nearly all of New York City has taken a number of steps to provide for blackout prevention, rapid restoration of service in the event of a power failure and to avoid equipment damage from sudden surges of electricity. It has installed auxiliary diesel driven generators at each of its 12 turbine generating stations and 15,000 kilowatt gas turbine generators in two key plants, including one at Ravenswood, Queens, home of the world's largest steam electric turbine generator with a one million kilowatt output. The emergency power plants provide light at the stations and restarting power for the bigger generators. Con Ed also has purchased and is ready to install 10 more gas turbine generators which will be able to supply enough power directly to the city's subway system in an emergency to keep tunnel lights on, signal pools, swapping electricity "back and forth on need." In New York, a central power dis- systems operating and get j patch center is contemplated trains into the nearest stations. Equipment also is being installed at substations, a spoke- man said, to reduce voltage slightly if necessary, thereby "supplying everybody with a little less power so we don't lose everybody." * * * Con Ed and some 18 other major utilities in the northeastern United States and Canada also have formed a coordinating council and operate power Presidential Guard More Efficient By HARRY KELLY Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) - Four years after Dallas, a bigger Secret Service with a more efficient look faces the challenge of protecting a President campaigning in an atmosphere of war and protest demonstrations. But several politicians questioned about the subject say A veteran Congress member|fairly limited domestic travel!is presidential exposure- familiar with problems of secu- j by a President who has in the j motorcades, crowds, well- past zest fully mixed with trumpeted schedules, crowds reflects security con-| If the service is concerned 'about possible security pitfalls on the 1968 campaign trail, it doesn't do its worrying in rity as well as of politicking, summed it up this way: "Presidents and presidential candidates are politicians, and politicians want to rub elbows with the masses, and no one will be able to stop them, even if the cerns over Vietnam demonstrations, as well as the pressure of state busines. For example, during a short visit to New York City Thursday Secret Service would like to." 'night, antiwar demonstrators Johnson's Veterans Day tour shouted out as his motorcade they don't foresee that security jthis weekend will be his first jet ipassed them:, "Johnson, murd- problems will restrict President swing around the country since Johnson's -or his opponent's-ability to campaign in the usual open, hand-shaking style in 1968, assuming Johnson seeks re-election. the 1966 congressional election. The schedule limits him to the relative security of military bases. Some observers believe the erer! Johnson, murderer!" There was heavy security both at the airport and the Americana Hotel, where he spoke. For the Secret Service bodyguards the antithesis of security public. But while it officially shrugs off such problems as pared with 350 in 1963. To get a near Albany. Computers will do most of the work. Communications and alarm systems also are being installed, says Shore. "If we can locate where trouble is develop' ing," he explains, "we can head it off before it gels serious." The Big Blackout in 1965 was touched off by a tremendous surge of surplus power from Canada. It pushed through the power lines which weave grid- like through the states. An FPC report to President Johnson last July recommended utility companies spend about $8 billion by 1975 to install extra high - voltage KEHV transmission lines. That's said to be about $3 billion more than the bird's-eye view of rooftops and | utilities planned, building windows, it makes use The EH !ines provide ,. a of helicopters. The presidential much bigger pipe to carry the limousine is bullet-proof. - The service now has formal liaison with the FBI, the CIA and other security and law enforcement agencies, creating a part of the job, it is acutely | routine channel for a vastly increased flow of intelligence. And it is making more use of' aware of the hazards. And it is better manned and equipped than it was Nov. 22, 1963 when President John F. Kennedy was killed by a sniper as he rode in an open limousine in a Dallas motorcade. It has 575 special agents com- Actor Charles Bickford Dies at 78 HOLLYWOOD (AP) - Actor Charles Bickford, who played rugged he-man roles on the stage, screen and television died Thursday night at 78. One of Hollywood's top character actors, Bickford succumbed in the University of California at Los Angeles Medical Center. After suffering an attack of emphysema, he was hospitalized last July. The illness later was complicated by an infection of the pneumonia. bloodstream and A friend said Bickford was 'still hard, • strong and-gruff" until the end. Survivors include his widow, actress Beatrice Loring, whom he married in 1919, and a married son Rex, 42, and daughter, Doris. No funeral plans have been made. * * « The red-haired Bickford, after more than 100 film credits, was enjoying success in television as the hard-fisted ranch owner on "The Virginian." Recently actor John Mclntire->who moved into Shoeless Hippies Censored by Airlines By KELLY SMITH Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) - It all boils down to shoes and socks. At stake: Can you get on a commercial airliner barefoot? Hippies, those self-styled flower children who often plane-hop from demonstration to demonstration, show up at airline ticket counters with guitars, long hair—and often no shoes. Airlines have rules about passengers. They won't accept babies under 7 days old, the mentally deranged, anyone with a contagious disease, or drunks. But someone without shoes? Or someone who needs a bath? "We don't want to dictate fashion," said an Eastern Airlines spokesman, "but we now require shoes." So does the Public Health Service. "Shoes are a question of policy," said American Airlines in New'York. "We're meeting this week with other airlines to discuss such a policy." Ah industry journal, Aviation Daily, says "airlines should exercise their right to refuse passage to those not meeting cleanliness standards." The American Civil Liberties nion says airlines have no authority to decide cleanliness. 'No right at all," said a spokesman. "To do so is the same kind Lesotho Diamond On Display at Smithsonian WASHINGTON (AP) - The Smithsonian Institution has taken on a new glitter.' On display through Thanksgiving will be the world's seventh largest diamond, the 601-carat Lesotho diamond found by an African couple, Petrus and Ernestine Ramoboa. Both ends of the diamond are broken and the Ramoboas hint they'll look for the other pieces when they return to their small tract of land in Lesotho. The Ramoboas were on hand when the diamond was put on display Wednesday. Eventually, jeweler Harry Winston plans to cut it into 25 pieces with a total value of $1 million. The Ramo- boas sold it to two Dutch merchants for 1302,400 after finding it last May. of reasoning that kept Negroes in the back of the bus." The Fede-J says shoes i.. . out of its jurisdiction. "Congress," said a spokesman, "has not given us statutory authority to make passengers bathe before boarding an airliner, unless it can be proven their presence has an adverse effect on aviation safety." The FAA did deal indirectly with guitar-playing hippies last week by ruling that a passenger can take aboard only one piece of hand luggage, and it must fit under his seal. Guitars don't fit. "Which does away with in- flight entertaining," noted United Airlines. "Wagon Train" when Ward;the studios, which didn't dare Bond died—filled in for Bickford. A multimillionaire, Bickford often played a captain of indus- oppose, stood behind him." "I was blacklisted but I stayed on—not because of motion pictures, but because I like try or a domineering father or California-stayed on, marked politician. He won an Academy time . took care of myself, found A,,mi.rl nn ™; n n*: n « Fn« 'TnV,n«l, nlltliflP JTlfPrPRfS " Award nomination, for 'Johnny Belinda" but once described Oscars as "a little bit loathsome." Born January 1, 1889 in Cambridge, Mass., Bickford did almost everything but act in his early years. In his autobiography, "Bulls, Balls, Bicycles and Actors" he wrote in sprightly style of things that happened to him in transit from a roughneck logger, hobo, barker, roach exterminator, U.S. Navy boxer, vaudeville performer, Broadway star to cinema. Once he got into a dispute witii Louis B. Mayer, and the producer fired him. "I wouldn't give in, I wouldn't be disciplined," Bickford re- i called, "and Mayer said I would Aviation Agency never play again> The rest of outside interests." At the time of his death, Bickford owned a feed business for race horses, a delivery service, and a medical exchange for Beverly Hills doctors. Although Bickford admitted that his speak-your-mind, shoot-from-the-lip attitude often won him enemies, he never regretted it. electricity in," says the Con Ed spokesman, and can absorb larger surges of power. The FPC has also asked Congress to enact an "Electric Power Reliability Act" to create regional councils of power utili- INSULATE ^** PIPES! ^-. PREVENT FREEZING IN BRIEF COLD SNAPS FIBER GLASS ai'«ou Fondren & Sons HARDWARE . GIFTS PLUMBING 311 W. Main — PO 3-4520 REE PARKING IN REAR scientific developments. It has installed a computer. The most impressive gain is in the field of preventive securi- j ty—the finding of troublemakers and potential assassins before they can strike. j In its assassination postmor-, tern, the Warren Commission i was icily critical of the lack of | communications between the Secret Service and other federal and local agencies. Although reports on Lee Harvey Oswald were in files of the FBI, the CIA, the State Department and the Office of Naval Intelligence, the Secret Service has nothing on him. Before the assassination, the service had about 100 names in its "trip file"—persons considered to be sufficient threat to be checked out when a presidential trip is planned. Now the file has 1,800 names, This doesn't mean that many more people threats to the that the service is getting more "I have no use for people in ] information from federal, state general," he said crustily. Bickford's show business career began in San Francisco where he found himself penni' less after a trip to China. 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