The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on July 1, 1944 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Saturday, July 1, 1944
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Page 3
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, JULY i, 19,1.1 amp Attracts oysFrliHere Scouts EnjojL Many •Sutdoor Activities I Rt 'Cedar Valley' (Nestling in the /heart of the Oz•s. on the South fork of spark- g While River, is Boy Scout mn Cedar Valley, haven of priheast Arkansas 'teen age nibs, many of whom arc enjoy", tiiclr last carefree days of do_J things near to n Seoul's heart •fore the call O f war comes, when fioivledge gained in Scouting must I transformed to knowledge ot fv lo best the enemy, •Each week 150 Boy Scouts attend •c camp from this secllon, while •e actual demand for accomoda- •ms exceeds 300 a week. Among •c fortunate youlhs who are i»r- Tipated in the body building, mind emulating activities of the camp fogram thus week arc members of 1-oop 31, sponsored by the Ameri|n Legion Blythcvillc's other Scout •oops will also spend a week at •e' camp later this Summer. [Members of the Northeast Ar- *nsas Council of Boy Scouts, Jilch owns and operates the camp' |e undertaking a five-year plan lo •crease the capacity of lh e camp •id service In general. Despite the lir, plans for camp improvements le going ahead, for they fee) lliat Aes e youlhs who must soon face •ar's grim reality should have an Tiportunity to benefit from the leasnres and education derived foni the wholesome atmosphere of tie camp. Little critically needed lalciials are involved in the con- •ructlon of the natural stone ca•ns, in which only a small amount I rough wood Is used. [Evidence that .the'.plan fov im- JrovemciiU is already underway is f.c strictly moderr.'mess hall and lilchen, t' l ter K-at«'supply, and |ewit'.ej'Au\, cabins; alf'bf which lie Tit - ^'ouths ?.re\ enjoying Uiis i \ " - : •• '' i Pi'B I Floyd White arid Jim'bates, who piled lhe camp Wednesday, re- lorted that the local troop ranked bird In the camp, but that the boys lad declared their intention of Bnkittg first before (he week was J Busy days these boys spend. No Itzy youths here, for reveille Is puiuicd at G a. m. After break- fist the boys engage in various Jcouling activities. They lunch at |2 o'clock, and have a rest period tarn 1 p. m., until 2:30 p. m., l-hen tliey resume their Scouting Ictivilies, consisting of swimming Ind various contests on which the loys are graded on the point sys- lem. Following supper at l> p. m., letreat is sounded at 7 p. m., the •nlors are taken in, and the boys Injoy camp fire activities until laps Ire sounded at B p. m. I particularly interesting to Mr. bates and Mr. White was the Inique system of water safety practiced by Ihe camg, svhich, is, a. lool-proof device ' toTiiiiranfee lafetv in the water. Each boy is Issigncd a "buddy"' before they en- let the water, and every few min- ttcs.' a whistle is blown", and each J>by'_must hold high ihe hand of his 'Y'- m this way each boy is nlcd for often. Tile camp is staffed by Council Executive Ward Akers, 'two council assistant Scout executives, slven ad- jlitional Scoulers assisted by a jua- ;>£ staff composed of 12 senior fcouls. BLYTHEVILLB (ARK.): .COURIER NEWS HOME, FROM DIEPPE By Sergf. Everett Oglesby As Told To Menno Duerkscn Tense Moments Aboard Ship VI. The d:iy did come. We were (ill issued our full equipment, ivenpons, ami all (ho ammunition we could carry. We were so heavy we felt like walking arseiwls. Aboard the ship our wUalion. officer called Hie men together. "Men," lie said, 'you have been trained for it; yon have qualified for il, and this is it. We arc going to Dieppe." All around men were standing,* : , men who had never seen action, who were soine Into their first baltlc. Eager eyed, theie men were standing with their attention focused on their cominond- oflicer and were so quiet and you could have heard men didn't have lo be urged to listen to orders or to carry equipment. grenades and ammunillo'i hart Just Sergt Oglesby been much more weight to Lieut. Russell Mosley \rrives For Visit Here : Lieut. Russell Mosley, who rc- eiyed his wmgs and commission rime 28 at the Marfn, Texas, 4rmy Air Field, arrived Thursday or a several days visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester ifoslcy, before reporting to transl- school at Laughlln Field, Del Rio, Texas, where he will take B-26 pilot training. .'Well known to gridiron fans for his prowess with the Chicks and atcr with the University of Alabama's Crimson Tide, Lieutenant Mosley began his army career lust pril when he entered the Atr "orps as a cadet while a student at if bama. . HF eceivcd instruction with the ollf Training Detachment at [the • Iverslty of Minnesota, Min- ncapi y, prc-flight training at Santa \na, Calif., primary at Tuo- Ariz., and basic at Ontario, Calif., prior to receiving his wings lat Marfn. Although it is three times as big as Europe, Africa has :i smaller [coastline. carry during training, now became precious cargo. They grabbed everything they could get their hands on and when they couldn't get any more they tried to buy more from their buddies. My promotion to sergeant had come only a few weeks earlier and felt a terrible responsibility for my men. But I was glad too, for after all those months of training and work, I was anxious to see some action. I think nil of my men felt the same way I did. They were like highly trained race horses, champing at the bit. Tlicn, suddenly, at the last moment when every man was keyed up to the highest pitch of excitement, the raid,was called off. We Feel lei Down It was lhe biggest disappointment : had gone through since coming to England. It gave the men an awful washed out feeling and we all felt as-though we had been let down. They told us the raid had been postponed for technical reasons which made it impractical to carry through. We were, however, kept under strict alert nnd told we would probably go tlic next day. Tlie next day, though, word came through that the whole thing was off. We were given leaves of several days and then sent back to our regiments for further training. Back with my regiment again, I fouad that they were putting us through even stiffer training than before. Now they made every man in our outfit march through artillery barrages. They laid these bar- ifSes in patterns so that a sergeant could lead his platoon through It'wllliout any casualties if he kept his head and obeyed orders. If he \ became nervous and went too fast,, it meant men getting killed. After several weeks of this the men were all pulled out. and given a rest, with special food and a special'place.''to sleep. Training Under Fire Then came another stage of training under lire, this time under small arms fire. This lasted until August 17, the day we .got word that we were to go on another big mock raid. The men though, felt that something else was in the air. And it was. The next morning we were all on the move. No one knew where we were going, but we had orders to check our men carefully nnd see that they were fully equipped. A sergeant in the British Army has an awful lot of responsibility and I was very careful lo see that all of my men were checked, for I, too, felt that something was up. By 1 p. m. that night we had all reached our destination and were once more loaded aboard a ship We were still being told it was for a big maneuver. At 11 p. m. the word we had been expecting came. U was the real thing. We were going to Dieppe! linal Instructions Life belts were issued, hand grenades and ammunition distributed again and every battalion officer called his men together for a lecture. We were told that we would have the support of the biggest aerlnl bombardment in history and the protection of a huge air fleet. We sergeants were given maps and spe- cial Instructions which we were to go over with our men to sec tluU every man knew his exact objective. Now that they know 11 wus the real thing, the men began asking 11 thousand questions, ns they had never done on maneuvers, Their eagerness was unlimited. A lunch of ten, coffee nnd sandwiches was served and we tried to sec that all the men hurt comfortable plfices to sleep. Sometime between midnight and 4 n. m. we were to lie lowered into the wnlcr In the landing barges. The Nnvy had complete charge of this operation nnd the Navy officers told us, "We'll get you there and If 'you'll do the Job we'll sacrifice our lives if necessary lo get you home again." BAAF Graduate Combat Veteran Lieut. Alfred Forand Describes Air Action In South Pacific first Lleul. Alfred J. Furnml, who received his commission niul wings In graduation exercises nl the 1JAAF Feb, 16, )9W, 1ms Just completed his 40ih combat mission In the South Pacific, military «u- thoillle.s at Hie niyllievlllc station have just been notified. Utmtcnnnl Forand, pilot of a li-25 bomber, completed most of his missions during the offensive against, nnbuul, (hough he also look inirl In ihc ncrlnl ntiiick (icalnsl the Northern. Solomons. In n your overseas, according to information received nt the 1SAAP, Lieutenant Forand hns witnessed mnny iiinismil sights, one of the most mcmornblc of which occurred ?n a night mission to Hukn passage. As the lleulcntuu recalls the experience, the Japanese hnd the enhances und Irotli shores well limlcd with nrtlllery. Our bombers •ere usslune,) to divert mid iieiilrnl- :c the guns. Going in m dee-lop TOMOKKOW: Death on beaches. Political announcements TCe Courier News na« been »a- khorlzed to announce the followiiuj andldacles. subject to the Demo- irattc primary in August: STATE KEFKESENTATTVK ALENE WORD . (for re-election, Post No. 31 W. J. WUNDERLICH (for re-election, Post No. 1) J. IJ5E BEARDEN (for re-election, Post No. 8) LUOIEN E. COLEMAH B. O "QENE" FLEEMAN Jf (Post NO, 4) RtOSECUTING ATTORNEY IVIE 0. SPENCER MARCUS FIETZ (For Re-election) BBKRIFF AND COLUEOTOB HALE JACKSON (lor re-election) W. W. (BUDDY) WATSON COUNTY TREASURER R. B. (SKEET) STOUT MISS BELLA PURTtiE COUNTY JUDGE ROLAND GREEN (fonre-electlon) DW1GI1T I!. BLACKWOOD CIRCUIT COURT CtEB* HARVEY MORRIS (For re-election) COUNTY CLERK T. W. POTTER (for re-election) ' Ouuner newt ltd* New C1NCSOPAC Vice Admiral John Henry Newton, above, is (he new com- jnander oJ Ihe South Pacific area •nd the South Pacific force of the U. S. Pacific Fleet, relieving . Adm. William F. Halsey, whoso deputy commander he had been. Admiral Halsey has been assigned to a new, undisclosed war role. SPECIAL For A Few Days 1 CASE COCA COLA And 75c Bottle Phillips GG Furniture Polish—Both 1.39 Bring Your Empty Botifca POTTER'S STATELINE SERVICE STATION Roaches, Kals and Mice eliminated. Contract service in pest control. Biddie Exterminators Free Estimates. £15 8. Third Phone Z75! Dr. J. L Guard Optometrist at Guard's Jewelry 209 W, Main J. LOUIS CHERRY NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE CO. Blytnevffle, Ark. NITRATE FERTILIZER For Side Dressing. J, L TERRELL S. Bdwy. Phone 2631 Buying Logs Of All Kinds. BARKSDALE MF_G. CO. Blylhcville, Ark. level, Uculcnnnl Fomml iiud Ills comrnrtcs strafed mul dropped to immcliulcs to itrtny tlio explosion uiiili the pluue Is dear) on Hie nun positions. 'Hie tracer uaUeni formed by lli t . Intense bin-rage ttmt the (li'lemlliiB k'imnprs threii' up filled tile iilslit so that It seemed impossible for even one plnne to opcrato In (he nren. Then 1111 mmmmltloii (lump went ui> nnd iwlrtcd Us brilliance lo the scene. "1 Iwvc never witnessed," suys Meulenmit Fornnd, "11 display ot fireworks to ,lvnl the exhibits' Ilio Jii|»s put on (or us Unit ntijlit," The most ii)lert\sll»K IJabiiu: mission lli« Heutennnt piirllelpnlcd In mis one of Uie low-level plnne hunts over tlic Tobmi nlrdrome, "We clinic out ot tile Uci's lit llie south curt of the field nt dusk mul strafed nloiuj Hie runway, liroppliiu our i)iin\rni(j.s as we rpared by., u iras nil over In u matter of seconds, but 1 cun still reiiu'inljer flylii;; Inroush tile dense dam- pattern tlio ground IjiUterle.s threw up for what. . seemed 'like an clcrnliy. !•;>•- erythue It fired, (In, projectile seemed to head slrnlKliL for .our plnne. That, niiiy have been ivlinl miule the rim seem so endless. Ae- t milly, our plnue W n s O j,| v |m |,y one 25 mm shell which 'lore nit Imir of our rliiht nlleroh, while we definitely destroyed one X.ero that was attempting 1,1 lake off, sel fire Negro Soldiers Offer Gl Show Here Thursday The Neuro'soldiers of Section F nt, Ilio Ulytlicvllli' Army Atr 1'lcld presented their second Ol show of the year »(, the Uecreiitlon Hall 'J'liin-.sdiiy iilnlil, and won the nn- fillnted ucelnlm of their buddies nnd of men from other sections on the JMWil. . Piirtlculurly well received wiis (he Beetlon p elite Club, which sang "OnWn In (lie Hky," "Stormy Wen- llit'i'," and "Taklnit n Clmnce on Ixivc," Also fentiucd wen: Corp. Oeoree Hulley, wlm sniii; "A Kiss In (lie Uiirk," mid 1'vt, Nulhnnlel Dickens, u'liu jiiiiiu "Tlivi-e's N« Two Ways AlKiiil Ixive," Pvl. Joseph II. Slocinn, u veteran liruiulwiiy nclor who luis appenred In Ncveuil productions with I'mil Kithesim, directed the show. Music. w«s tu-ut'hlctt tjy the orelies- tra of Hie 051st Army Air 1'oi'ces to an oil dump, nnd undoubtedly H'CTV io,v|ioiislble foi' some of (he other Imrnliiii plnnrs the cameni plck'.'d up." I Iciitcu.'int ftmind, son of Mr. mid Mrs. A. J. I'orniul, 700 New lirltaln St., Hiirtrord, conn., eii- tmxl tlic Army Air Forces In September, in-Hi. in civilian life ha wns employed by the llnvltord lileclrlc filed Uomiiaiiy. Promoted Myron 11. Wood, nbuvo, Is new commundci' ot Ulh USAAF Service Comnuind In Knijland. Ho replaces MnJ,-Gcn, Henry J. Miller, recently demoted nnd returned to tlio U. S. for disclosing Informnllon on dale ot Allied Invasion, "mid, pliiylHB under the dlrcellon of 'I'ech. Horgl. Al Poskonkn. USO Camp Show' To Be Offered At Post Theater , Snm "Schlepperam" Hearrif'the* giavcl-voccd comedian who woS fame on he Jack IJtnny radio pro- ginm, will entertain military p«r- "Schleppcrinaiv will come here us, lie featured performer nt "St«p Lively," n USO Camp show to b« presented here under the auspices of the Bucclnl Service Office Ollici rndlo and stage talent In 'fatcp Lively" Include Stan Kav nmigh, well-known comedy Juggler- n/*eitn Rtmoii, toe dancer; the Ihrce Hlalr Slslen,, vocal trio; the Ihrce n.ijs, comedy acrobats- mid Milton Sherman, pianist »nd. musical conductor. • ' AdmKslon will be free to all mllltniy personnel nnd their.ism- t'r.ilic for Phone Girls VIN1TA, Okln. (UP) - Vlntta's telephone operators have been honored by the Vlnlln Rotary club, as unsung heroes," A special guest at n luncheon meeting recently hon- flfliiB the operators was Mrs. Marl e A Nh, who recently retired after 30 yeurs of "hello" work. THE TOP and Still Going Strong! CHICKASAWBA DISTRICT CITIZENS HAVE BOUGHT MORE THAN $1,000,000 WORTH OF BONDS DURING THE FIFTH WAR LOAN -AND WE'RE STILL BUYING* HERE ARE 5 MORE REASONS FOR BUYING: 1. War Bonds are the best, the safest investment in the world! 2. War Bonds return you $4 for every $3 in 10 yrs. 3. War Bonds help keep prices down, < 4. War Bonds will help win the Peace by increasing purchasing power after the War. 5. War Bonds mean education for your children; security for you, funds for retirement. LET'S KEEP ING THE ATTACK This space is a contribution to America's all-out war effort by Arkansas Grocer Co. L. K. A&hcraft Co. loe Atkins Machine Shop .. H. Aufcry, Burdette A. S. Barboro & Co. Jarksdale Mfg. Co. Jiytheville Water Co. h e Crafton Co. )elta Implement!, Inc. ,oy Eich Chevrolet Ce. Gay & Billings, Inc. Guard's Jewelry & Optical Store Halter's Qualify Shoe Shop Happy Hour Grocery & Mkt. Hardaway Appliance C«. Herrick's Jewelry Hubhard Furniture Co. '''ibljardHwiwtie Ct. Huddleston & C#. Tom W. Jackson Jiedel'g Langston-Wroten Co. Charles S. Lemon* Planters Hardware Co., Inc. The New York St«r e Pat O'Bryant Palace Cafe J. C. Penney Co. Phillips Motor Co. Robinson Dnif Co. I, Roseathal, Inc. RockSaliba •"" Rustic Inn A. G. Shibley Wholesale Groan C. G. Smith 'V- '.-j , Floyd A. White ' '*i> v l Zellner's Slipper Shop ' ' \ : ni>|iti iu f y ^

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