Tucson Daily Citizen from Tucson, Arizona on February 28, 1970 · Page 2
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Tucson Daily Citizen from Tucson, Arizona · Page 2

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Tucson, Arizona
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Saturday, February 28, 1970
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Page 2
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PAGE 2 Entered as tecond ctati matte* Prjt olflee, Tucion, Arizona T U C S O N D A I L Y C I T I Z E N SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1970 Bull 1, Clown 0 -- Cllizcn Photo by Gary Gaynor Rodeo clown Chuck Henson of Tucson had a rather, uncomfortable confrontation with a Mexican fighting bull yesterday but came away with no injuries. The clowns, Henson, Larry McKinney of Phoenix and Quail Dobbs of Coahoma, Tex. (in the barrel) fight a Mexican bull at each performance of the Fiesta de los Vaqueros. The rodeo's final performance will be tomorrow. ,. . Tucsonians Lead., But If s Still Anybody's 'Bull' Game · · ' " · . ··/ V By JiM BERRY qtizen Staff Writer.. Tucsonians Ron and Vern Hawkins had the fattest wallets today in La Fiesta de los Vaqueros, and last year's all- around cowboy was making a strong bid to. retain his title. . B u t even veteran spectators won't chance a bet on who will draw top/cash by the time the final buzzer sounds tomorrow. It's anybody's bull game, with second go-rounds in-full motion today.- ; ; .'. - .The;.Hawkinses'! had winnings of = $736:55; each :\yith a 10.9-seo end marie -in the team roping event first go-round.;.; Defending all-around champ Led 'Camarillo of Oakdale,. Calif .,· had a 13.1 in calf irbping with one steer yet to be roped for average and the team sieer event still to goi . Another contender is Donnie Yandell of El Sobdr'ante, Calif., with a second in the first go- round in steer -wrestling and leading in the second go-round of team roping. Junior Muzio from Fresno, Calif., was out of. the picture for over-all money in calf roping despite a sparkling 12 seconds in his second go- round. His first go-round was 24.5 seconds. Smiling .Casey Tibbs,.. a six- time world champion saddle bronc rider, came out of retirement yesterday -- but only briefly. A mean maverick appropriately named "Ding Bat" tossed him to the turf before you could say Tibbs. Black hat and all, he bit the dust in a split second. · All first go-rounds now have been completed, with the ex ception of the Brahman bull rid ing, which will continue through tomorrow, the final day. In that event so far, Dickey Cox o f . 'VValnut Springs, Tex., and Ron Taylor of North Hollywood, Calif.,; were leading with uptight 695. ;;· ''·'· The : crowd i' of 10,500 wa treated;~tr some extras yesterday:. Michael -Landon of "Bo- nanza^TV'fjrUiie appeared and introduced Robert Shelton on behalf of Old Tucson's 10th anniversary. The Quadrille de MU- yeres of Maricicopa performed, the Warvel Family and Princess Kachina and White Feather appeared, and the three clowns did their usual splendid jobs. First go-round results are: Calf roping-- Camarillo, 13.1; Bill Snure, Douglas, 13.5; Don Creighton, Elida, N.M., 13.7; Bill Hamilton, Joseph City, Ariz., 111. Steer wrestling -- Walter Wyatt, North Hollywood, Calif., 6.1; Yandell, 6.5; C. R. Jones, One Of Dionne, Quints Dies MONTREAL (UPI) -- Marie Didnne Hpule, one of the famed Dionne quintuplets, was found dead in her apartment Friday night at the age of 35, leaving three of the quints still alive. There was no suspicion of foul play or other unnatural cause of death, according 'to. her brother- in-law, Germain Allard, the sisters' spokesman. Mrs. Houle separated from her husband, Florian, four years ago. Their two children, Emilie, 9, and Mpnique, 7 live in a convent: '; . . ' · ' : Two of the surviving quints, Annette and Yvonne, live in Montreal suburbs and a third, Cecile, resides in Quebec City. A fifth quint, Emilie, died Aug. 6, 1954. The patient is happier... Adjusts easily to any desired position to help keep the patient comfortable and healthier. It's waist-high to make bedside care much easier. Foam mattress included in low monthly rate. Electrically motorized hospital bed also available. Prompt delivery. 24-hour service. MEDICARE LOCAL AID PATIEKTS-. Abbey's home care equipment is now available to you. And 43 years of experience u n i q u e j y qualifies Abbey to provide equipment that fits each patient's precise needs, On any questions about equipment and procedures, including, processing: of claims, call wur Abbey Rents store. j .and Sells, too 472! E. BROADWAY -- TUCSON 795-8480 724 W. INDIAN SCHOOL RD. PHOENIX Santee, Calif., 7.3, and Brooks Pettigrew, Chandler, 7.7. Team roping -- Eon and Vern Hawkins of Tucson, 10.9; John Peaboojian, Fowler, Calif., and Billy Darnell, Hodeo, N.M., 12.3; Gaiy Gist, Lakeside, Calif., and 'Den Kimble, Apache, Ariz., 12.6; Muzio and Frankie Ferreria, Fresno, 12.9. Bareback bronc riding -- Joe Alexander, Casper, Wyo., 75; Jim Mihalek, Denver, 73; Buzz Seely, Roosevelt, Wash., 71; Paul Mayo, Grinnell, Iowa, 67. Saddle bronc riding -- Marty Wood, Bowness, Alta., Canada, 77; Bobby Berger, Halstead, Kan., and Larry Kane, Big Sandy, Mont., 76 (tie); Hugh Chambliss, Albuquerque, 72. Wheaton Alumni Edward A. Coray, executive director of the Wheaton College Alumni Association, will,speak Thursday when the Tucson alumni of the Wheaton, 111., school hold their dinner at 6:30 p.m. in the University of Arizona Student Union Building.' Long-Haired Cowboy Is No Hippie rodeo trail, but. his first seriou injury since he joined the Rodeo Cowboys Association in 1955 sidelined him both N in movie; and in the arena. "I tore up this knee," said .Wyatt pointing to a knot where he had \yorn a leg brace. "I wafe laid up for three months." '.Wyatt' calls himself a -"home type" who likes to be with his wife and daughter as much as he can, but "I love rodeo anc love to bulldog." He said he competes in as 'many rodeos as possible when not working and proudly points to a 2.9-second time he scored on a steer in Los Angeles. Things were going right for Wyatt in Tucson as he left yesterday afternoon to fly to Hous ton for another try at his "love 1 -- bulldogging. ; If his 15.1 on the two heac stands up, Wyatt stands to add some more cash to his first go round money. Advertisement DON'T BUY A HOME . . . Until You See The New Verde Meadows Crest Town Home Apartments! Sam Witt, president of Witt Construction Company, announced the start of construction on a new town home apartment development to be called Verde Meadows Crest. Ninety units will be built, with a total valuation of $1,500,000, at the corner of Irvington Road and S. Cherry Avenue. The new development adjoins Witt's'Verde Park and Verde Meadows developments which were completed this month, with the last of 375 units being built. M.ike Demko, marketing : . director of Witt Construction, said, "We are going to feature in Verde Meadows Crest the same concept that we originated in our Verde Villas development.. Most town homes will face on a; fenced desert landscaped private court, 'pro-, viding a . desert landscaped garden view for all residents, of the units except those few that will face the Catalina Mountains on Iryington/Road. In addition, there- will be a decorative block front wall with : wrought iron »ates along the Irvington Road entrance and paved, ighted and fenced rear thoroughfares into the development for addec Security. Our marketing has proved that there is ; need for this type o apartment layout that en sures a peaceful, quie and secure environment." Verde Meadows Crest will have five models for sale from 510,900: a one bedroom, one bath town h o m e ; one b e d r o o m bath and a special Villa activity room; two bedroom models'with one or two baths and a specia! two bedroom model that includes the large Villa activity room. Witt, who. has been b u i l d i n g h o m e s ; and a p a r t m e n t s in Tucson since 1946, is a former president of: the Southern A r i z o n a Chapter, Na tional Association of Home Builders and is Life Director of the National A s s o c i a t i o n of Home Builders. :'· The.first units .will be ready to show March 1, with occupancy schedulec for shortly after. For. f u r t h e r i n f o r r mation, call 29*1-0251, or drive out Park Avenue and follow the signs to the sales office at 1338 E, Louisana, (Open daily except Saturday and: Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.) ; '' Assault On Courts ' \ ' · · ·'· ·' ; ^ ^ ' · '; · " _ ' . ' By Radicals Must Stop, Says Agnew PHOENIX (AP) -- Vice President Spiro T. Agnew says the assault by revolutionaries on the nation's courts must be stopped if justice is to be preserved in America. Agnew spoke to about 1,900 Republicans at a ?75-a-plate dinner last night. He was interrupted often by applause. "The trial of the Chicago Seven or JCight was a stormy footnote to the 1968 Democratic convention," Agnew said. "It could have been a test of the constitutionality of the 1968 Civil Rights Act." Instead, he said, "The script was written for drama, not for justice and the outrageous courtroom conduct totally obfuscated the constitutional question.". "Our courts don't need lectures from self-appointed social critics or the antics of guerrilla theater," the vice president said. "Within the courtoom dissent must be orderly . . . the, rule is persuasion, not intimidation." He said the court's business is to favor neither the majority nor the minority but all. "The courts need lawyers who are not self-proclaimed disciples of a new cult," he said, "and reporters who do not predetermine the guilt or innocence of the defendant." Agnew characterized today's radicals as "totally negative and nihilistic with perverse ideas of being like the founding fathers." "Those who smash windows and seize universities destroy by injustice whatever is just," said Agnew. The vice president, commenting on the burning of a bank in California, said, ."As Americans know, those who burn banks can bank on being burned.'' Agnew hastened to add, "I mean by a fair trial of a jury of their peers,'so you, don't take me literally," . Senior Citizens The -Tucson Senior Citizens Club No. 1 will meet a.t 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Downtown Center, 220 S. 5th Ave. Arrangements have been.made by the club to serve lunches to the public in the dining room at the center during the national shuffleboard tournament, Tuesday through Friday. Husky Dies Of Seizure ' WASHINGTON (AP) -- Milton Husky, a member of the Arizona Corporation Commission since 1966 died yesterday in a Washington hospital at the age of 48. Husky suffered a stroke Tuesday as he was going from the Washington Airport to his hotel. He was to attend a meeting of the National Association of Slate Regulatory Utility Commission ers when he was stricken. Robert Kircher, head of the utilities division of the commission, said Husky's son, George, and daughter, Marsha, were at his bedside when he died. Husky, a Democrat, was elected to the commission for a six- year term in 1966. A native of Evansville, Ind., he came to Phoenix 5n 1927. Husky was a graduate of Phoenix College in 1947 and Arizona State University in 1949. He served as state treasurer in 1963 and 1964. Husky was a member of the Creighton School 'Board from 1957 to 1965. Husky won the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal as a bombadier on a patrol bomber in the Pacific during World War II.- Funeral services are pending. Kircher said an autopsy would be performed in Washington before Husky's body is returned to Phoenix. DEADLINE MARCH 14 License Extension Signed Into Law PHOENIX (AP) -- Gov. Jack Williams signed into law yesterday an emergency bill which extends the deadline for obtaining 1970 license tabs until March 14. Today would have been the last day for obtaining the tabs without penalty if the emergency action by the Arizona Legislature and the governor had not . .... , . Picture, Page The House on Thursday had passed a bill granting a week's extension but agreed yesterday on the two-week grace period approved overwhelmingly by the Senate. In other action yesterday (he Senate passed and sent to the House a bill removing the restrictions on the hours women may work. The vote was 17 to 13. Supporters of the legislation said the present law handicaps. women who are competing with men' for jobs. Opponents said repeal of restrictions could open the way to exploitation of female employes. TUCSON DAILY CITIZEN MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The AP it entilled exclusively 1o the ust for republicolion of all local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP newl dispatches. MEMBEROF UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL SUBSCRIPTION RATESi Home Delivered in Tucson: By Carrier, JO'per week or S26.00 per year. By Aula Roulei Sz.20'per monlh or S2(MOperyear. , , - , i Home-delivered ouhide Tucson 50' per week or 12.20 per month. Moil rates. Payable in advance. State of Arizona: $2.73 per monlli or 433.00 per year. Oulside Arizona, Including-- Canada and Mexico: S3.25 per month or $37.00 per year. Second class postage paid at Tucson/ Arizona. . ' Published daily except Sunday by CITIZEN PUBLISHING COMPANY P.O.Boxi027Phon»:(602}622-5855 THE NEW BEATLE ALBUM 1722 E. SPEEDWAY 1 Blk. West of Campbell 326-1010 OPEN 10-9 P.M. Man. to Fri. SflT. 9 to 6-SUH. 12 to £ "HEY JUDE" ON RECORD 8 TRACK CARTRIDGE AND CASSETTE ON APPLE USE OUR MANY WAY PAY PLAN OR MASTER CHARGE SUNDAY - WILMOT PLAZA ONLY SPORT COAT SALE VALUES TO 29.95 WHILE THEY LAST! Large assortment of styles and colors from which to choose. Broken assortment of sizes, but over TOO coats to pick from. Hurry while selection is greatest ... Wilmot Plaza store only. SUNDAY ONLY SALE! FABULOUS FAKES ... [f^W' 1 --- EA. 2. VALUES TO 9.95 Only your jeweler , will know for sure.' Silver and gold filled with semi-precious stones. Assorted sizes and shapes. Sunday only at Wilmot Plaza MYBRSON'S WILMOT PLAZA WIIMOT AT BROADWAY OPEN SUNDAYS IT:AM TO 4 PM MONDAY AND, FRIDAY'Tlt.9 r**/. SUNDAY ONLY T A FRED A SLIPS by BARBIZQN REGULAR 5.00 The slip that fits like a dress and makes ypyr 'aYess. fit : :v_ like a d^eam Beautifully enhanced|$i$ embroidery and side zioper for that. pe.rfecf fit., Sizes -7 V 15, 10;to 20, U 1 /? to 26/2, and'38'to 44 in white only SORRY NO G/FT WRAP OR'PHONE ORDERS ON SUNDAYS | i

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