Philadelphia Daily News from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on July 20, 1977 · Page 3
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Philadelphia Daily News from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania · Page 3

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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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Wednesday, July 20, 1977
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Page 3
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Wednesday, July 20, 1977 Philadelphia Daily News 3 Jlftifi!tiwifi) Flocxfed, IHyimdir(dls Fie : -ma mi rTun - - - j - ; - - - -- y, --iiHli''iiii)iiilriiWrj'--iiinliV.wni-tTMilirmi-wa. aii if"" rrmi imimnn iniMiinirim-ioiiin m n Man Scene of downtown Johnstown 24 hours after 1889 flood 3 Oops Face Beating Rap By JIM SMITH The new federal grand jury inves-igating allegations of police brutal-ty here was in business only six lours yesterday before it returned ts first indictments. Three police officers were :harged with a federal misdemean-r in connection with the alleged pril 29 beating of William Leon Cradle, 23, after he ran a stop sign n Society Hill. The officers Lyle Eugene Spra-;ue, 27, Raymond Anthony Casper, 23, and Koy Lee Land, 32 were charged with one count each of depriving Cradle of his rights "under color of law." U.S. Attorney David W. Mar-ston said yesterday his office was investigating "more than a lozen" allegations of police viola-ions of citizens' rights. Marston's office began investigat-ng the Cradle incident when wit-lesses to the alleged beating came Cradle forward. The office ' already had' been investigating charges of alleged police brutality in the department's homicide division. At least six witnesses to Cradle's alleged beating told their stories to the Inquirer in May. CRADLE, AN instrument technician who lives in Queen Village, had been stopped for running a stop sign while he was on his way to 5th and Walnut Sts. to pick up his wife from work. After waiting seven minutes, Cradle said he became anxious about his wife. When he asked a police officer about the delay, he said the officer told him, "Take your black ass back to the car." Cradle reportedly drove slowly away, then was stopped by police. Witnesses said he was dragged from the car and pinned against it by three policemen. He reportedly was beaten wilh nightsticks on the stomach, legs, arms, chest, and head. CRADLE WAS treated at Metropolitan Hospital following his arraignment on charges of assaulting police officers and resisting arrest. Those charges were dropped June 21. The one-page indictment handed up yesterday charged that the officers did "strike, punch, kick and otherwise assault" Cradle and "did aid and abet, counsel and induce each other and other police officers employed by the City of Philadelphia whose identities are presently unknown to the grand jury" to beat the man. If convicted, the officers could be sentenced to up to one year in jail and fined $1,000. OFFICER SPRAGUE already has been charged in state court with aggravated assault, simple assault, official oppression, obstruction of administrative law and conspiracy in the incident. Cradle was the only witness interviewed by the federal grand jury yesterday. He appeared with his attorney, Michael A. Schechtman, shortly after noon and stayed in the grand jury room for about an hour. Afterwards, Schechtman told reporters, "He told his story. In view of the fact that we intend to file a civil action, we wouldn't want to jeopardize it or the U.S. attorney's investigation (by talking further)." JOHNSTOWN, PA. (UPI) Ten feet of water today engulfed this city which has become synonymous with flood disasters, chasing thousands from their homes and spreading death and widespread destruction through the surrounding valleys. By midday, five deaths were reported and rescuers were snatching the stranded from trees and rooftops. Many more were reported missing in the seven counties surrounding Johnstown which was devastated by floodwaters in 1889 with a death toll of 2,200. Rivers and creeks gorged by a sudden overnight deluge of up to 10 inches of rain swept cars, nouses and businesses along in the gush of water that reached 10 feet in some areas. The city was isolated except to the helicopters that were rushed to aid the rescue effort. SCATTERED LOOTING was reported and a "shoot to kill" order was issued to the police. National Guardsmen were called to aid the rescue effort. Mayor Herb Pfuhl estimated damage in Johnstown alone would exceed $100 million. A huge Bethlehem Steel plant stretching seven miles along the Conemaugh River was extensively damaged. William Dickson, civil defense spokesman for hard-hit Cambria County, said most roads, telephones and electric services were cut and the rescue headquarters was swamped with calls for help. "We have sick babies, heart attacks and people want firemen. It's been going on all morning," Dickson said. ROBERT JOHN, a reporter for the Johnstown Tribune-Democrat, said thousands fled to high ground overlooking the city of 42,000. It is situated in a valley in the Allegheny Mountains where the Conemaugh and the Stonycreek Rivers converge about 55 miles east of Pittsburgh. The heavy rain fell for four or five hours last night during a series of storms that struck without warning. Minor flooding was first reported. Then the streams began overflowing in torrents, sweeping aside homes like matchsticks. James Cox, a state police spokesman in Harrisburg, said two of the five reported deaths were confirmed. Mutilation By JOE O'DOWD and JACK McGUIRE "I cut off her hands and pulled out her teeth." Robert Thomas Nauss Jr., 25, of Aston Township, Delaware County, arrested last Friday and charged with murdering Elizabeth (Liz) Lande, 21, allegedly spoke those words to an acquaintance, the Daily News has learned. Nauss Nauss, arrested two days after the disappearance of Ms. Lande on Dec. 11, 1971, and released after questioning, reportedly told a friend he didn't care if police ever found the woman's body because they wouldn't be able to identify her. DAILY NEWS SOURCES said Ms. Lande received a phone call the night she vanished and told three people in her home the call was from Nauss and he was coming to pick her up. She was never seen again. Police apparently connected Nauss with Ms. Lande's death after a witness told them he had helped Nauss cut down a woman's body hanging in a Folcroft garage and later helped dispose of the body in New Jersey. Nauss, sources said, was living over the garage at the time. The witness allegedly took police to the disposal spot, but the body was not there. Police theorize someone returned to the site and moved the body. The same witness reportedly told police Nauss received a Christmas card from Ms. Lande several days after the alleged murder. Nauss laughed and joked about it, the witness said. THE DAILY NEWS has learned that none of the witnesses are members of the Warlocks motorcycle gang of which Nauss is an alleged member. All indicate they will testify against him. Nauss faces a separate trial on federal charges of conspiring to sell the drug methamphetamine, and also has been charged with the rape-abduction of a Delaware County teenager last October. Ms. Lande's disappearance had been linked to the death of four other Delaware County women. All reportedly knew, members of the Warlocks. "NOBODY WAS prepared for it." John said. "The weather forecast had in no way indicated a storm ol this extent. With these hills, the more it rained the more it became frightening. "Cars were washed down streams People began leaving their homes early this morning as the flood waters began to rise. "They are establishing refugee and medical- centers in the subur ban areas. Housing centers are being set up at school buildings ." MAN'S MISTAKES triggered Hie May 31, 1889 Johnstown flood. An earth and rock dam, backing up a resort lake, burst and drove like "God's steamroller" down ihe Conemaugh Valley and through Joh nstown in a tragedy so sudden and complete that it became part ol American folklore. Nature undid Johnstown in 1977 Seven inches of rain fell overnight, sending the picturesque rivers and creeks berserk. Witnesses in Job nstown said water flashed 10 feet deep in the town where the civic bogeyman is the 1889 flood. "This is serious, very serious. But of course it is not in the same league as the '89 flood," said James Cox, spokesman at State Police headquarters at Harrisburg. State Police and the National Guard helicopters plucked stranded persons from rooftops and bridges They flew in doctors and medical supplies. GOV. MILTON SHAPP was declar ing the seven-county flood sector so miles east of Pittsburgh a disaster area. Johnstown was the eye of the Continued on Pace 19 r The Weathen Today Mostly sunny. High 95-100 Winds WSW 5-10 MI'H. Ram chance 20 percent. Tonight Warm and humid. Low 70 Winds WSW 5-10 MI'H. Ram chance 20 percent. Tomorrow Mostly sunny, with a chance of thundershowers. High 95-10(1 Rain chance 40 percent. Temperatures Here And There Citv Philadelphia: Int. Airport Center Citv Atlantic Citv Boston Chicago Los Angeles Miami New Orleans New York Pittsburgh St. Louis San Francisco Washington HI Lo Conditions W 74 W It 3 74 o 49 It 71 2 63 IS 77 4 75 102 78 7 69 95 71 43 54 94 74 Sunny Sunnv Sunny Sunny Sunnv Pair Thundershowers Thundershowers Haie Sunny Sunny Fair Fair Precipitation Last 74 Hrs. PhHa Int. Airport 0 0 North Phila. Airport 0 0 Sun Rites S:49 Sun Sets 4:26 Tides Philadelphia Delaware Cape Mav AM PtM. ACM. P.M. ACM. PM High 4:52 S:27 17:05 11:27 I I I I LOW 12:27 5 SS 4:03 4:S9 5 08 To Call The News: News - 854-2600 Circulation - 854-2281 Home Delivery 665-1234 Retail Advertising - 854-2690 Publlthod dolly at 400 N. Broad St., Ptilladel phla. Pi. 19101 2d CIM pottage pd. it Phils Mall 4Ubt. (ion 1 2) SM year, S6 month.

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