The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on May 22, 1939 · Page 1
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 1

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Monday, May 22, 1939
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BLYTHEVILLE COURIER NEWS THE DOMINANT NEWSPAPER OP NORTHEAST A^RICANR/ia IWT> nnn>mrn'.r«. VOLUMK XXXVI—NO. 53. OP NORTHEAST ARKANSAS AND BOOTKEAOT MISSOURI Blythcvlllc Courier Mississippi Valley I enrtcr • ——— mytucviiie npraia ^_jj^iiio_Daiiyj^ K ,, Bl.YTIUCVJLLl!), ARKANSAS, MONDAY, MAY 22, I'B'J SINGLE COPIES FIVE CENTS * PENDERGAST GETS 15-MONTH^ENTENGl Tension Increased In Danzig Area By Week-End^Slaying DANZIG, May 22~ ( UP)-Angry7i.ti-Poli S h tlcmonslra- i OILS were reported in towns of the Daiixig area todnv as tic result of the killing O f a Danzig-Go,™,,, cHixe, 1 y M Polish clmullcur, who lira] iron, » motor car of tlie Palis commissioner to Danzig. » " ll "- ' "" s " Danzlgcrs gathered around the Polish customs building at Piecke), near the East Prussian frontier, and loudly denounced Poles, It was reported. A window of the building was smashed by Nazi storm troopers, one of whom brandished a dagger. Demonstrations were reported also nt Welder, in the corner where Poland and Germany Danzig, meet. The Polish representative here handed Danzig authorities two notes on yesterday's shooting. It was believed they amplified th Polish version of the incident, An official Danzig governmcn communique, reporting the shooting Incident ami announcing a protest to Polish officials, said: "On the night of -May 20-21, a citizen named Qruebncr was sho by a Polish citizen, a chauffcm named Murawaski. The shootini, was without reason.' 1 Car Plunges Into Lake; Four Escape persons escaped from a Pact Formally Signed BERLIN, May 22. (UP)—Germany and Italy signed a military pact today, converting their diplomatic "axis" inlo a formal alliance, and announced that thei were ready for peace or war. It was announced officially that the pact provided: 1—Germany and Italy agree to pursue a common policy III fll principal European questions. 2—In event Hint their common interests are endangered by international events of any kind they will immediately consult on active measures" to i preserve these inter csls If Ihe secunty 01 utal in tfirests. -af-eithei part> are men acea irbrii'mitstdD, the otVer'party ' will give lull political and diplomatic support to overcome this danger. 3—11 against-Ihe wishes and hopes of the contracting parties either of them is involved hi armed conflict with a third power or powers the other party will immediately go to its aid and support It with all military powers on lam! and sea and in the air. 4—In order to carry out this aid both countries will increase their military and military-economic cooperation In the Initnedate future, for whch purpose two permanent commissions will be established. 5—-In event of war in which Germany and Italy are both fighting on Ihe same side they will make peace only in complete agreement with each other. 6 Germany and Italy in future will continue and extend their close relations with powers friendly to them. 7—The pact is operative upon signature and effective for 10 years. Before the end of this jieriod Germany and Italy will consult on prolongation of the pact. receiving serious injuries,'after the machine had plunged into seven feet of water at Big Lake Saturday night. Miss Maurine Dimlvaut, i7 Marvin Wlialey, 18, and two other occupants were In (lie roadster which took a nose dive into the lake when tlie driver put his foot on Die throttle instead of the brake in attempting to stop. The accident occurred on a side road off Highway 18, at tlie Big Lake bridge after the motorists, who were returning to the brut house where MLw Dimivnnt resides, made a turn to the left. Occupants of the car were able to climb out of the car and to swim to safety while lights from the machine were still burning lo make a weird scene of fish an;! snakes swimming underneath the water while the motorisls were making their escape. The limits burned for three hours. Tlie machine, which was extracted from Its watery'-grave Ihls morning was, not badly dim aged except f$; ^\alcr, I „ Court Declares State Conditions Shipment, Even In Inlerslale Commerce LITTLE ROCK, May 22. (UP) — The • supreme court today upheld •in Arkansas law prohibit!)!., the transportation of liquor across (he slate without a permit from the revenue rj;p,irtm«il airirmjng a verdict ol HandoJph circuit court which fined Fny Jones of Cnlro 111., $500. Jones was arrested in November 1938 while transporting 50 cases of tax paid liquor from Upton to Cairo. In a justice of peace court he was bound over to a grand jury indicted and fined 5500. The Justice of peace In the rural coint confiscated the entire shipment. „ In his appeal to the high court Jones' attorneys charged that the stale interfered with the interstate commerce commission and petitioned that the ruling of tlie Ttan- dolph court be set aside. All Dressed Up For First Train Trip •••r^ai^ : I The supreme court denied thai • D '' KiS ," 1 '" C ° n '' s ' "'"' lllUs w! ' lc " Uley vorc °" " rsl (fnl » «P ouUldo of nursery, (ho Dlonne If* I'foln'p nit frit* (., 11 _ 11 . - ft!"/? JiilOtt'll refill V fYlT- (hfifr tni ii'ii nir tr\ 't*ni-n,,t ,. I „ „. ^ _i 11 ^ i , the state's action in the matter of transporting was a violation of the interstate commerce commission, "Arkansas has not undertaken to prohibit the transportation of liquor. It merely conditions H " the court said. Jones won one point in his case, however, when the court ordered' that the liquor be 'relumed or that price of it be given him. „„„ ,,,„,, , , ., , - •>• ""«"«« "i iiinatij, iiiu uioniiG timmm>ii:[.< are .shown ready for their Journey to Toronto lo meet the hint; and queen of England. Rich little miss hugs her fnvorllc toy. U fl lo rl B l.f. Emllle, wllh monkey; Annelle, wllh leculy bear; Cecil,-, will, bunny; Marie, with black toy (log; and Yvonne, with doll. Concubinage Charges Are Filed; Trials This Week Likely Mrs. Dora Spiels, 25-year-old vhite woman, and six negro men inve been arrested on charges of concubinage, it was announced today by Sheriff Hale Jackson. The nen arc: Artis Tally, Gas Frce- uan, Early Boyd alies "Son" Hicks Murphy Gurrett, Hubert Guy and Roy Newsom. The arrests were completed Sun- Ijnvcr t'oiirl Action Ornlrd LITTLE ROCK, May 22. (UP)— The right of a lower court to-set aside a verdict of a jury after 1111 appeal has already been, filed with the supreme court was denied today by the, tribunal, when;!,it 'nf- flnned Hie conviction ''in' A'rkiim/iA county circuit mirt of Hollis Piei- cher who was 'sentenced lo one year in the penilcnliary for Ihe theft of a cow. and calf. Fletcher was convicted January 16, 1939. His attorneys immediately filed an appeal with the supreme court. On April 25, during the same term of court. Circuit Judge William Waggoner ordered the verdict • reversed and petitioned the penitentiary to release Fletcher huiiic-' dtatcly. I The penitentiary board declined,' however, to release Fletcher Ire- cause of the pending supreme court, ase. I Affirmed by the court today was! .1 Crawford county circuit court I ruliitg awarding $7,000 damages to' Ernest J. Riley for Injuries suf-| , Queen Elizabeth Exchange Kisses TORONTO. Out, Mny 22. (UP)-The Dlonno miliHuplets saluU Ml Queen Elizabeth today wllh five moist kisses in one of the strangest audiences ever granted' by British monnrchs. The queen, forgetting royal custom mid tradition, leaned over and put her arms around each of Hie Dioune children ami kissed jlhem : hack. V •' .. , ,\ , <• The audience'look place in t'l.ufdrawitig room'of .tlie''lic-uleiir.nl governor's quarters In the parliament building. The quintuplets were dressed In ankle leueth court dresses of while and wore little white poke bounds. Dr. Allan D.ifoc, physician am! guardian of the • quints, camo to the royal audience fearing that at least one of the mile girls would stand on her hcud, seize the king's sieves or othci-ivlso behave as five-year-old children do. He could have forgotten his worries. The quints did swell. They had liccn carefully schooled In the technique of making curtsies but no one had nnllclpalcd they would put their arms around the queen's neck ami kiss hci: That was their own Idea. Fortune In Footstool PORT ELZABETff. South Afrl- -, — ._j »„» ...JHIIL.I ijui- i iv_»ji,i tjud/iuui i ri OOlllll till 1- fered by himself, h« wife and small ca (UP)—A wooden box used as a '" 1 "" ll< " ' '"•' footstool in (he unclaimed'proper- , daughter when their car was struck by mi improperly lighted engine of the Missouri Pacific railroad. vorkcd two days and nights on Hie ase after receiving a tip that the voman had been involved in nl- egcd sex crimes 'for the past three months. Originally from Jonesboro, she worked at a cafe on Ash street for Fvnprf Thnncandc T,, \some time but has not been em- dxpect inousanfls .0 \ alnm , anysvllcrc recEntly> 0 ,,, cers j •-. G. Partlow, deputy prosecut- LITI'LE ROCK, May 22 (UP)— '"& attorney, announced this after- Special trans, busses and farm! 110011 Uiat the defendnnts will be trucks are expected to bring more lll(iict ed directly into circuit court than 3.000 rattan fnrmnn in T^i_ a »<i that trials will be heard sometime this week before Judge G. E. '^eck. II is probable that the cases .will lay morning after officers had Because Ihe. judge of the lower i inuy Hear Wallace Speakl 58 ^ be tried night, than 3,009 cotton farmers to Little Rock Friday to hear a speech by Secretary of Agriculture Henry A. KeclCl Wallace, officials of the Arkansas Farm Bureau Association said today. Wallace is expected lo clarify the administration's attitude toward a proposed cxporl subsidy on cotlon lo stabilize pUces in the address sponsored by the Farmer's Federation, the- Farmer's Union and the Little Rock Chamber of Commerce. Last September Wallace Vigorously opposed the subsidy plan at Port Worth, Tex. It Is expected, however, he will answer opposition lo the current export subsidy plan in his speech. Injured Motorists Are Now Improving The condition ol Levl Carzine, Mrs. Cnrzlne and eight-year-old son, Charles LaCross, who wire injured in a highway accident near Osccola late Friday night, Is much Improved. Mr. and Mrs. Car- zinc were able lo leave Walis hospital yesterday and Ihe son will probably be removed home lolsr today. He has a head Injury. Mr. and 'Mrs. B. Grant, who were also In the car which failed to make a curve on Highway 61, were bruised and shocked but their condition did not necessitate hos- pltalizatlon. The East Prairie, Mo., residents were enrautc home from Marked Tree and Ttilol, Ark., where they had been visiting relatives. Tuesday or Wednesday Penalty for such a crime Is from one month to one year in the stale penitentiary. License Plate Postage Is Boosted One Cent An additional one cent postage fee has been added to passenger automobile license, it was announced today by Mrs. B. M. Dark of the local revenue office. The office was notified today that a six-cent postage fee shall be charged in the future on all passenger automobile licenses. That charge has ben customary on all truck licenses. Two Injured Slightly When Truck Is Ditched Billy Cade and Charles Williams received slight injuries when a Dr. Pepper Bottling Company truck ran Into a ditch late Friday afternoon, near Dcering, Mo. The front of the heavy truck was practically demolished when it struck the side of a ditch after Mr. Code had lost control of the truck white driving in rough gravel. Mr. Cade was bruised and Mr. Williams received a slight head injury. ty room of the railroad company here, has been round to 'conlnin SCO.OOO In bank notes. The -box ar- charges of J1.25. .. ..... . j,. v . tt ^ „, „,,,, ,v,,>ui vv,y,\ruu HI U.llltv IIOICS, 1 lie I10X al court failed lo instinct the jury to rived more than 27 years ago hut consider contrlbiilory negligence the womnn to whom it was' ad- the tribunal reversed nnd remanded 'drc.wed refused to pay the dclivciy for new trial in the Desha county ' circuit courl n decision awarding $3,333.33 to Chester Frank Beard for the death of his 12-ycnr-olrt son, Chester. The boy and playmate were killed by a Missouri Pacific train last fall. The court denied Lcona Phillips, widow of Carl Phillips, a new trial in Scarcy county in her suit to recover on behalf of herself and her children $12,500 in damages for the slaying in May, 1938, of her husband. Phillips was shot by Coy Turncy as he approached Turney's farm. A feud of several years had been going on. Turney was never indicted for the shODting because of a clearly suited case of self defense. For lh<jt reason a new trial was declined. The court affirmed an Independence circuit court Judgment of Ilclicf Hoards HARTFORD, Conn. (UP) , . So many persons misunderstood the functions of municipal Hoards of Iiellcf that tile Ocncral Assembly voted lo change Ihe name lo Boards of Tax llcvlew. Legislators were told that persons oil relief had been applying to the boards of relief for grocery orders. Enters Guilty Plea In Federal Court AtKansasCity •„ months " WHS sc '" tcncq(! to iu ' iao " for one y enr and "three lie also wan lined ? 10,000. * " •* Sentence wns Imposed by Judge Men 111 E Oils. ; *"" UIIJ B yjmuui, 01 income taxes' May Give Employer. Per- *2S,'£^;M * **g mission -to Petition For nllow cnch slclc n » ".our in which pi .- to present aiguments. k '" LlCCtlOIl Pcndcrgast,. his round lace slightly Hushed, did not go to the- WASHINGTON, May 22 (TJPV- blu '' ' n > e P'«* of g"»ty was en- Olinlrnian J. Warren Madden to- tt ' r '' <l lw """ "' > ' 1 ° ""—-•- — l ',',"? ,1 nW tllia lllc NMlonal Labor Ucliidons noiird Is giving serious thought to ministrative "clwngcs" In Its ad rules \vhlch wo\ild - • •"•.*>• « iiit.il \VUUIU permit employee lo petition for nit election to settle Jurisdiction^ disputes between labor unions. The cluunju has uecn repeatedly requested uy employers and today ww advocated | )y Donald Wakefield Smith, former board .mem- —.. u ,,,. b "i tuiuiiM uuarci member, whoso nomination was .\vlth- (trntvn from tlic scimtc bccniiw of widespread opposition, Midden made his statement af- ler Chairman' Elbert D. 'fhomas (Dom., Utah), of (he senate labor Charles Fricrson, Sr. Is Named First District Committee. Member 11TTLU ROCK, May 22 (UP)-^ Tlie supreme coiict today appointed ii seven-man committee of at- loriinys—one from each congrcs- slonnl dlstrlct^-lo assist the trl- liimii; lo enforce, rules recently adopted lo regulate professional conduct lit liic bftr. They wci'o: First district, Charles D. Prlcr- son, sr. -Jonesrjoro; second district, Ernest Nell), Bnicsvllto; third district, Arthur Smith, SI Ion in S]>rlni;s; fourth district, John Woods, Fort Smith; fifth district, Mitchell L'ockrlll,, of Little Hock; slxlli district, A. J. Johnson, stnr City ami seventh district, O. A. Graves, Hope. CnnstntilK .Cushions B. . committee, which amendment is considering to the Inbox; act, snld Hint such « change ,...„„» be "u very, very helpful tiling'to consider." , • Three Hurt Wh?n Cars Collide On Hifeay 61 Nfaurlco Stanley, 23; of .Eviuis- viltc, tml., received an Injured hip mul E. M. McDonnlct of Uixora, and Mrs. Marie Bmsflcld Southern of Victoria were less seriously injured when two cars collided Sattudiiy shortly before noon mi Highway til. n mile south of this ly. . . Mr. SHantiy Is confined to Ihe Uyihevllfc hospital bemuse of h's injury aii(> Infmrn/ii hut his wmill- lloti Is not, ticllevcd^to be very serious. Mr. McDonald and Mrs. emergency Southern were , given „...*.„ treatment and later dismissed, 'Hie Indiana motorist, who was jcnroiitc from Memphis to Evtins- ' ' ••"•• «-.J»iniy IIUILII WIICI1 tlic titoific Dickson, 52, escaped death accident occurred. The left side or serious Injury 'when he jumped of his car mis badly dauiugcd. ,.„,,, - - ~ j '•-•• "• '•'" *-«' vino UIIUIY (luinuuca. M feet from the first floor of a The machine driven by Mr Me- (InU'llI mmi llnliil tiEiAnimn l. n I.tl rs-.._i.i . ... _ J _. downtown hold, because he hit Police Constable Ron Kvelelgh before he landed on the pavement. The constable deliberately ran under the man and broke hi!' full us he hurtled lo Ihe cement sidewalk. Donald In which Mrs. Southern was also riding, wns also damaged. S. n. Stanley of Cio.MVllle, III., father of the Injured man, arrived this morning to be with his Tells Graduates To Face World With Faiih, Righteousness ages done when his truck was struck by a Missouri Pacific train. Guardsmen To Protect Taking 1 his text from Eiihcsians 6:13. "Wherefore, lake up the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and haling dene nil, to stand", the Rev. James A. Ovcrholser, pastor of the First Presbyterian church, emphasized the importance of truth, righteousness, preparation for tlie gospel of peace and faith in tlie lives of cillzens when he delivered the baccalaureate sermon uefcrc the 1)8 members of the graduating class of Ihe cily high school Sunday morning at the cily auditorium. white, the high school colors, took their places while Miss Kathryu Grcar played Beethoven's "Adagio". The processional of the class was preceded by the prelude for which r\ • T • i P' ecea efl i>y the prelude for whic o UUring InaliMIss, Grear played Chopin's "Prc LITTLE ROCK, May 22. (UP) — A company of Arkansas national guardsmen will be on duty in Pine lude" and the choir processional " used, cdlctlon given by the Rev. Mr. Carpenter anil flic class recessional for which Miss Grcar played Mcn- delss;)m' S "War March of 'the Priests" and the protrude. The Rev. Mr. Ovcrholser's sermon follows Iti part; "Tlie apostle P.-uil la this memorable passage represents the world as a place where spiritual forces ,ire clashing. It is the age- old struggle between the good and Ihe evil. . . . The great message of this text Is that In this mornl struggle the godly man Is given a means of protection. "You members of Ihe graduating class, as you are about lo occupy a larger place in lite, will be In need of this protection ami this support. . . . You are now approaching the time when there will be a real testing of your faith in for which "Ucly, Holy; Holy" was life and Its possibilities. There are """' before you both difficulties and , Following the singing of the gutit uoikii,ii win ui; UI1 UUly 111 i 111" WH\*«T '1'u v'n, .11115 j uj£ ui Lilt Bluff Thursday when Sylvester i "Doxclogy". Oeorge W. Patterson. Williams, negro, who is charged millls(c1 ' of (he First Christian with the assault murder of Irene church, gave the Invocation to which Taylor, goes on trial, it was learn- ((lic clloir san = a cllor «l response, ed today. " j Mrs. Paul L. Tipton, director of music, led the choir in the s!ii!ii!i3 cf the anthem, "Lift up Your Heads". Asliford. Mrs. Russell P,irr City Survey Financed By Finding Lost Lot ! "''T.,™ t ,,rc reading «,, s given ru. nm , , ,' ' (UP) -Cily officials paid for a complete resuryey of city property by dis- °° 8a Sl " Or " sl ™yed" lot. *' Mr ' A» ,i . After the survey was completed, ofuclals discovered the "lost" lot iiear the ocean front after a number of streets and property lines had been changed by the new sur- ter, pastor Rcv of the l and the offertory First, Bap.lst ' , , . church. For the offertory, Debussy's "Clalr Do Lunc" was played. A men's Irio composed of C. o. Rcii- man, T. H. Haynes and D;n Sulh- erlnnd sansr "Father, I Conic", Moore. An anthem, "Gort So Lo VC( ] the World", Slainer, preceded the bcn- perils, "First there are certain pers:nal difficulties, such as the natter cf| continuing your education, or of' getting a job. Almost immediately larger responsibilities will be thrust. Upon you. and you may came into contact with some of the less attractive phases of life. But In addition to this, you will find jourselves In a wcrld which is cut of harmony with Christian teachings. . . . Now it Is a world In which there are both wars and rumors of wars, a. world In which true democracy Is finding H hard to survive. . . . Ii> our mvn country, moreover, there has been n moral surrender. . . . With nil of the marvelous strides which the world has made In this genorallon In the fields of science nnd technology, Ihere has been one outstanding and terrible loss— namely, the loss of Ideals. "If such Is the condition of our contemporary world, what opportunity or hope awaits the young person who enters It? ... You may have, on the one hand, the outlook of Shakespeare's Hamlet, who was In a trying slluallun but who could not bring himself lo do the thing that he knew he ought lo do. His expression was, 'Tlie time Is out of Joint; Oh. cursed spile that ever I «as born to set it right.' On the other hand, there is a character In the Old Testament who lived In a time of national crisis when there was no leadership. In an hour of communion with God. Isaiah saw an opportunity in the inldsl of despair, and lie said, 'Here am I; send me.' It Is this kind of spirit that we need at present. "The best assurance and support with which we can enter this sll- uallon In life are given in the great body of Christian principles. "Tlie first of the pieces of spiritual armor, which Paul has advised us to take up, Is the girdle of truth. This is essential to all of the olhers. What a difference would be made If Ihe truth were told and the truth were known everywhere. "Then there Is the 'breastplate of righteousness," . . . "Tlic apostle speaks also of the 'preparation of the gospel of peace.' This Is directly opposed to the current way of preparing for peace with armaments. Only the spirit cf peace can achieve this great gcal. "The 'shield of faith' Is a most valuable piece of armor. We must have foiUi in ourselves, and be- lieve that we can be the kind of persons that we would wish lo be. A man's life would nol be tolerable — ..*....„ ,, uv .,„ fj»i.i Hiyii,- t.ti uiiiiuiiify 10 fny (.ULrKJfl t II were not for the belief that ing products from foreign Is able lo overcome his weak- • •• he nesses and faults'. We must Attorneys Enlcr His Visa 1 KANSAS CITY, Mo, May 22. (UP)—Tom Pcndergast, Die Demo^ cratie political boss of Kansas City for many ycaig, pleaded guilty in federal court tcday to a charge of. evading payment of income taxes.- tered by ono of his attorneys and (hen medical testimony was offered. ~". ! It was the hope of the defense' that Pemlcrgast, who ha? jiofc been robust since 1038, would-be, given n light' sentence in addition to (he expected fine. Tlie maxlmui)!- that Judge Otis can Impose ori each of the two counts Is five years In prison and n. Jlo,000 fine,The streets around tlic tempo- rniy federal building were Jammed wllh curloifs when Pendergast, ae- companlcd by his son Thomas, J: Pendcrgnsl Jr, his nephew, Jahies Pciidcigast, and his attorneys, B.' it. Bioivster and John C. Madden, 1 arrived. ' '• • , The 07-yenr-old man, who hod iinmcd United States senators and Mlsfcourl governors because of his tremendous power and the efficiency of ills political ' organization showed no signs of emotion "when ho .walked to the counsel 4 t ME GjplZEt Says Argentine Canned Order Is "Just Drop In Bucket" ; ___^ %— i MEMPHIS, Tenn, May 22! rup)' -Tho navy department's contio- verslnl oidei for 48,000 pound-5 of Argentine canned beef Is just "a drop hi the bucket" compared to federal foreign purchases of cotton competing products, according to Donald Comei, Birmingham) Ala., loxtlle executive. Here to attend Ihe Southern Governors' conference .'on the federal wage-hour law and dlscnmt- ualoiy frclghl rales, Comer said Hint the government annually buys millions of dollars worth of. jute for string for the post office depart mcht "Cotton string could be used just ns well," he said. 'No question has ever been made' of this action. I don't see why congress gets aroused over purchase of a few thousand dollars worth of beef when millions are expsnd- ed annually to buy cotton compel- , , — Comer urged that federal Intrr- have faith in our fcllowman, also, ts l be turned toward siding cot- fill/! Ill mo. ,,.n..l.] »n.l_ ,_ , ° ton purchases, pointing to the national drive, which opens today;to encourage increased buying of cotton products and In our world. This we can do only if we remember that this is God's world. Unit He Is sovereign in Its affairs, and that He has a plan for all life. H Is only through faith that we may be sure of His ultimate victory In Ihe world. "Wearing Ihe armor of God is an adventurous thing. It Is challenging and thrilling, while living in a world that Is far from Ideal, to try to make the Impression ol our Ideals on the world lhat It may become better. It is said of a certain man in an ancient bcok of wisdom, 'that he went forth armed with a dream', some may think a dream very unsubstantial armor, but the man who Is armed wllh a dream frees himself from the necessity of living In a hopeless world, lie has the courage and the pattern to fashlcn a belter world to live In. "The armor Is Invisible. It cannot be seen with the physical eyes bul wllh the eyes of the soul. There Is a lustre about It, but ll Is spiritual. Real heroism Is the heroism of character. "The test of this armor Is In living. The assurance of the text Is that lie who wears it will be able to stand. "Our wish for you Is that you may go forth, not as those who have no hope for themselves cr lor the world, bill like that one of whom ll was said that he went forth armed with a dream," ' Sues To Set Aside Tax Title Of Delta Company The Southwest Joint Sleek Land Bank In a land foreclosure suit filed against Ira Crawford and wife and Mack Williams and wife-in chancery court here has made the Delta Farms and Title Company a co-defendant. The plaintiff seeks 'x> have ! a purported sale by a commissioner on drainage district tax foreclosures to the Delta company set aside as void. It charges that the sales were void for various reasons. It also claims thai the corporation did not actually pay k> the commissioner the money bid at the time of $uch tax sale purchases. F, C. Douglas Is attorney for:the plaintiff. WEATHER : Arkansas—Partly cloudy; tbrilnh't and Tuesday; scattered thurider- showers .Tuesday. . •• Memphis and vicinity — Piflly cloudy tonight, local huiidershowm tomorrow afternoon, and night; Wednesday showers and cooler.. <_'

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