The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 13, 1951 · Page 13
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 13

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, September 13, 1951
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Page 13
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER IS, VLKTHEVILLS (AMC,) COURIER NEWS 7A8E THIRTEEN How to Escape Through Iron Curtain: Pick Mushrooms and Ride Red Auto n t .<< 1 BERLIN (NEA1—iT._ are two very useful itemt to use if you want ta slip through Czechoslovakia's jjpn Curtain and escape to free- til^ In West Berlin. One is a mushroom hunter's basket. The other is a Soviet rone "People's Police" car. Karel Douba, a 32-year-old Czech, used them both for a bizarre flight from Red oppression. Douba decided to go West after Czech political police had kepi him locked up in a Prague prison for a year. His politics? Pins pong. The table tennis champ of northern. Czechoslovakia, Douba was arrested last year. "All I had done," he explained, "was to tell people in a restaurant how well our tennis stars had done when they fled West. Some eavesdropping agent reported me to the police." When he got out of Jail again last May, Douba began making plans. "I was relieved to fine: border-Jumping much easier than I had dream- the Soviet sone weren't nally C!OM- ly guarded at all." With a mushroom basket In hand —and a couple of mushrooms In !t 'or authenticity—he was able to tool the one guard he met on the Czech side of the border. The minute the guayt turned his oack, Douba jumped the ditch that marked the border and wa§ in East Germany. A little later, a(t«r he had worked his way through the Grotteau border woods, his heart almost stopped. He stumbled into the "People's Police" car. But instead of getting arrested he got a free ride to the outskirts of Berlin. "Good thing I Bpeak German," he said. "I told the police .driver, th« only person In the car, that I was from Dresden and going to Berlin. He believed me—and wasn't talkative." v He got to West Berlin simply by boarding the elevated train in the Soviet Sector. Now in a West Berlin refugee camp, Douba would like to BO on further—to South Africa. After his luck with the mushrooms and the Steel Industry Called on Carpet As Washington Demands Action By §AM DAWiON HBW YORK, Sept. 1». <AP>— The steel industry U on the carpet again. Washington wanU It to build new «*«el mills faster and thut ahorten the period of tteel ahortage* plaguing the defense program and civilian Industry. Thia demand that the »t*el Industry complete its huge expansion program six months earlier than it planned follows oy a few diyt order by the pefen&t Production Ad ed," he said. "The woods bordering • police car, he thinks It will be easy. KAREL DOUBA: "It iras much easier than I had dreamed," Rubber Stocks Said Adequate Acheson Good 'Gavel-Banger/ McCarthy Says In New Attack WASHINGTON, Sept. 13. UP)— tions as to which should be repre- _^ Larson Denies ' There Is a Shortage As Senators Claim WASHINGTON, Sept. 13. (IPl — General Services Administrator Jess Larson yesterday denied a Senate committee's charge that rubber stockpiles are dangerously low. He told Congress the govern- Senator McCarthy (R-Wis) said yesterday Secretary of State Ache- • son "die", a good gavel-banging job" at the Japanese peace Conference but dealt "another blow at antl- lommunists in China." Senator Knowland (R-Calif), on the other hand, declared the treaty signed at San Francisco last week is a good one .aimed at keeping Japan out of the Communist orbit. McCarthy, arch critic of Acheson, ment will not Indulge in hand over-list, natural rubber buying In a rising world market. A report issued by the Senate armed services preparedness sub committee has-led rubber interests to believe that the United States will launch "an Intensive buying program regardless of the inflation ary resul ts," Larson s aid. GSA f isures showed that world rubber prices jumped II per cent in six days following the Johnson report and still have not receded to the price at whic-h rubber is sold by GSA to American industry. Larson told Johnson that achievement of the military stockpiling goal is "not too distant, assuming normal market conditions, and that the synthetic rubber plant reactivation- program is making great strides." ^ He disclosed that GSA is arrang- <Rfig the transplanting of natural "rubber trees from the Par East to Central America—outside the reach of possible Communist aggression In the Southwest Pacific. This program has "met great success," Larscn reported. Hand Sticking from Auto Trunk Brings Police in Hurry on 'False Call' NASHVILLE, .Tenn,, Sept. 13. <>P) — Police received jiumerous calls about the hand seen protruding from the trunk of a parked automobile bearing out-of-state license plates. Several callers told the desk ser- outlined his views when a reporter asked him for comment on two Republican senators' praise of the way Acheson conducted the treaty conference. The public praise has come from Knowland and Senator H. Alexander Smith (R-NJ). They attended the conference. Both men. parties larly Knowland, have been sharply iritical of Acheson In the past with respect to administration policy toward the far'east. •As I understand It," said McCarthy, "Senators Knowland anc Smith commended Acheson for the way he presided at the conference sessions, and did not direct their remarks to his policies. Gavel-Banging Not Questioned "I don't question the fact that he did a good gavel-banging job. For that, the stage-setting was beautiful He kept Nationalist China from at ending the conference and he in vited the Russians, who fought th Japmiese only a few days as com pared with the years NationalU 'hina did. "It was another clear cut blow the anti-Communists in China." Neither Nationalist China Communist China was invited t the conference because of differ ences among the treaty-sign ing na geant: "It locks Uke i homicid case." Negro Patrolmen Otto Willis an Gentry Blcdsoe went to the seen They saw the hand. It was neat manicured and its nails polishec They opened the car trunk and th hand fell out. It was made of rubber. nted. For example, the United ates recognizes the , Nationalist ime and Great Britain recog- zes the Communist government. The tribute Knowland and smith ,Id Acheson toucned off a dispute nong Republicans in the Senate sterday. Senator Malone (R - Nev) chal- nged them angrily. He denounced le treaty as a step he said will be dlowed by an alliance between ipan and Red China. He declared ie pact represents "the beginning the final downfall of Nationalist hina," and predicted the inevitable esult will be admittance of Com- unist Chins into the United Na- ons. ministration. This order cut almost in half the amount of structural steel the itecl industry had asked for the next three months. The st««l companies wanted lo be allowed to use this -structural steel to build new stwl mills to k«j> their expansion program on schedule and thu* ba able to turn out more steel for defense and civilian goods, Waihlngton'ft demand on tKe steel industry to speed up and pr-xiuce one million extra tons the flm three monthi of IBM also follow^ by R few days a British reque.-t that American steel mills be directed to send Britain 800.000 tons of steel. D. 8. Is Serious The government U deadly «r:ous about Its worry over the shortage In steel. It wants new steel mills and it wants steel scrap collections stepped up everywhere — In the factory on the farm, and there has even been talk of urging housewives ;o save tin cans i which are mostly steel) to help make up a scrap shortage which the Industry calls critical. The steel shortage is such thai the government has cut back thi amount that can, be used to builc pipelines for oil and gas, to build freight cars, to build autos and othe for the family auto. V. 8. Has Char Res The government has some charges to throw at the steel industry, too. Defense Mobilize Wilson charges that some steeltnen are planning to cut back steel production '.he first part of next year by several hundred thousand tons while Iney reline furnaces and overhaul equipment. He's calling: stocltncn to Washington next week to tell them they cannot cutback but must spi-oil- Instead. The steel industry Is now ymduc- liig at annual rate of 105 million tons, its expansion plans call for apacity to reach 110 minion tons b> he fir.s't of 1952 rtmt 118 mlllhn tons >y the end of 1952, Wilson will ask hem to hit^thc lla million t<;n ra'.e iy next June, And in the back of their mind. us they talk to Wilson will be Iht memory that President Truman ha. been plugging for over a ye.'s- nov HI his dcniLind—If the .stcel indus .ry can'l expand fast enough, th government should be allowed t build stcel mills Itself. civilian goods, to build highway brid ges, to build schoolhouses. To save alloy steel and scarce aluminum the government Is setting a limit to ih making of automatic transmissions Hollywood Continued Irom page I Ill get a peek at her ctmisole. "We want people to see what's mportant," he explains. UST A DAVS WORK Ida Lupino and Robert Ryan play » tense, hair-raising scene in "Days Vlt'nout End" on the RKO lot and iven onlookers who are aware of ,he camera and crew are caught up in the make-believe of the two stars. It's the yarn about a widow who s held prisoner in her own home by a maniacal killer. Audiences who »ee this movie wll be held In (he grip of the scene a little longer than the set observers, however. The moment the action is over, Ida, a terrorized woman a few seconds beiore, announces: "I'm going to my dressing room to get'my 'eet massaged. They're B me." ' har new atarrlng Mm. "Oklahoma Annie," is being rehearsed at Republic, ahe poinU out an Amaionlc Blonde bit player, who ha* been swinging a balsa wood *M too realistically and has already Icnocked out a male extra. A few moments later, Director R. G. Springsteen and A»oclat« Producer Sidney Picker go Into i huddle about the enthusiastic axe swinger. "Take away Ihc axe from tliat dame before she kill* somebody," Picker finally orden. "This Is 'Oklahoma Annie,' not 'Oklahoma Lfo- lle Borden,'" Young SfcipjMr 6«tt Ship OENTRALIA, HI. (AP) — P»rm- born James L. Cor hai become a U.S. merchant marine captain at 25. Ralph Cox o( near Johnston City, III., said hi» son was advised that he had becoms the youngest emrchant marine skipper. He completed in 30 months work on captain's papers that usually take* five years. Judy Canova \s grinning BE a rowdy bar room brawl sequence for Dog Inhcritt Estate PERTH (AP) _ A 19-year-old blind man, whose dog had led him about for the greater part of his life, has left his estate for the up' keep of Die animal until he dies. 'Tor many years I have been totally blind and Toby has been a! faithful companion to me," Howard Hope Hills wrote In his will. Ten-year-old Toby has now been provided with enough money per week for his expensive tastes In rump steak, crayfish, pies and cakes. DR. W. A. TAYLOR Veterinarian Office* Now hi ST. FRANCIS DRUG Pherw 35*1—Nil*. Ml* Arkansas Justice Named to Parade LITTLE ROCK, Sept. 13. Ifi — Associate Justice Sam Tobtnson the Arkansas Supreme Court \..... be parade marshal for the opening I day parade of the Arkansas Live-! stock Show here Oct. 1. This was announced today by State Sen. Clyde E. Byrd, secreUry- manager of the show. Robinson will ride a quarter horse named "V-Day" at the head of the procession, Byrd said. Stepped Up! Gasoline & Tractor Fuel Extra Miltk Extra Power Get The Best 'I Sell That Stuff" G.O. POETZ OIL CO. Phone 2089 225 N. FIRST 41 *1 • MACHINE WORK (All TT*M) • LAWN MOWERS All kind mower* »a4 tinea repaired. • WELDING (A«T Tr»e) • Bicycle Repair (Complete ttn. <* ADlhoriu* S*rrte« * r*rte I Clinton Enfiiu*. fe* ul ' WESTBROOK'S MACHINE SHOP Doctor Says Continued from page 8 he office and Raid It was all right. —Mrs. R.M.C. A—It IB perfectly possible for the actor to make all ordinary tests of he urine right In the office. * • • Q—What causes gallstones and m they be dissolved without an operation?—Mrs. E.A.J. A—No one knows whal causes gallstones. They cannot be dissolved by any medicine. * * * Q—What Is the difference b*- iween muscular dystrophy and mul- :iple sclerosis?—J. G. A—They are both commonly classified as nervous diseases but are entirely different In symptoms and behavior. The causes of neither are •ell understood but there Is no reason to believe that their origins are alike. • • » Q—Can a man ft* r-*—: old havi cataracts removed?—A.F.D. A—It can be done, uut whether it should be depends on many individual circumatancef. Read Courier News Classified Ads, For a lifetime, of EXTRA VALUE see DE SOTO IXTRA VALUI from bumper to bumper—that's DeSoto! You feel it in the ride you get . . . hear it in the compliments you get... see it in every detail of this great De Soto! iXTRA SAFETY! No other car in America has bigger brakes! De Soto's big 12-inch brakes require far less pedal pressure and give you smoother stops. And that's only part of De Soto's important safety story! EXTRA COMFORT! No other car rides like a DeSoto! De Soto's amazing new Onflow Shock Absorbers, in combination with other comfort features, account for the difference I EXTRA BEAUTY! No other car gives you more new beauty! Look at De Soto's massive new front grille . .. wider, lower body design . . . richly- grained new instrument panel , . . There's new beauty throughout! Look at the Extra-Value Features DeSoto Gives You! N»w Oriflow Shock Absorbers • Tip-foe Shift • Big, High-Powered Engln* New Parking Brak* • Featherlighl Steering • Mora Visibility « Gyrol Fluid Oriv* Big :j-lnch Brakes .Waterproof Ignition • Long Wheelbase • Safety-Rim Wheels For the DEAL of a lifetime see your De Soto- Ply mouth dealer! WAIT 'Til YOU HEAR th. terrific trade-in allowance your De Soto-Plymouth Dealer will give you on the new De Soto that suits you best—then take advantage of it while you still can choose your delivery date I Seagram's 7 Crown. Blended Whiskey. S6.8 Proof. 55% Grain Neutral Spirits. SeiBram-Dislillers Corn.. N. Y. MOTOR SALES COMPANY 110 West Walnut — Blytheville

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