The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on May 20, 1939 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Saturday, May 20, 1939
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Page 6
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- PAGE SIX BLYTKEVILLE, (ARK.) COURIER NEWS SATURDAY, MAY 20, (Continued (torn Page One) Then, unexpectedly and diffidently lie talks of Hollywood's portrayal of a crusading writer who, sue- 'cessful and surfeited in his later years, answered a spiritual urge to .fight'for n. falling cause. "That picture got next to me," )je told lits fellow passengers. "I'm. not as old, or—I hope—us fat as tliat Frenchman was, anil somebody has to try to help cotton. The cotton people must be brought together to promote col- ton find ndverli.se it and fight for 11. And it's going to take someone with the time and r. little money to start • things . . -. I'm no crusader, and cotton's future can't worry me personally, but I think I'll try to start a cotton 'organization—a cotton council." That was the beginning of the National Cotton Council of America, insofar as any one event could Tiring to crystalizatlon the dream of cotton unity which for years lias possessed the Imagination of Southern leaders. What Oscar Johnston's leadership was to accomplish was made passible by the leaven which had been working among warchousers, seed crushers, glmiers, merchants, and producers. The dream had been dreamed in Louisiana, in Texas, in Arkansas, ' and Alabama, throughout the entire cotton belt. And now these fragmentary plans and programs were to be unified In (lie National Cotlon Council of America. * -* * It Is June. 1938. MUsissiuplnns become accustomed lo the dry he.it which is good for cotton but hard on strangers. No. Mississippian, Dr. Prancls Sayre, Assistant Sec- rclsry of State and son-in-law of Woodrow Wilson, knew that he would be unpleasanlly warm this 15th of June. Yet, In uncomfortnole black suit, and stiff collar, Dr. Sayre sits on an improvised speakers' r'stnnd in the athletic Held of Delta Slate Teachcis College at Cleveland, Mississippi "Bhj Ulan From •Washington" Oscar Johnston is introducing him. and it is nt the Misslsslu- : plain's' request that lie is attending the nnnuarnieeling of the planters' Delta Council, which Is 'to''serve as the springboard for the formation of the National Cotton Council of America He mid Assistant Secretary ' of Agriculture Harry Brown, and Governoi Hugh While of Mississippi, and other national and Southern citizens of pmnte and political prominence are ou that speakers' stand, foi sistent ieso!\e Is taking shape. a per- Tl:c Introduction;- Identifying Dr. Sayre and blessing- Secretary Hull's reciprocal trade agreement.), is finished. The audience, three thousand perspiring white and black citizens packed in Hie ••stadium's uncovered stands, applaud, some \niderstandingly, some uncorr.pre- hcndlngly, all approvingly. A big man from Washington has come down to help Mister Oscar Johnston do something for eaUon AmrUhe-"big man" lalks for• Jtr.!I an hour over a nntldnnl hoo. l r-np which sends to the whole country his plea lor the clearance of trade channels. "It is.not merely that the manufacturing centers of Ihc country, are vitally dependent upon the prosperity of the cotton growing states," he concludes. "The agricultural regions of the North and West are equally concerned. Some 58 percent of the total farm population of the United States live today in the sixteen cotton slates. In these clrcumsanccs, consider what a permanent curtailment of market outlets for cotton would mean. A substantial part of this vast population in the cotton slates would be compelled cither to take up the production of other crops, or else migrate to the cities and thus further swell the vast reservoir of labor supply already available in our industrial centers. If the South is compelled, on a rapidly increasing scale, to turn to the commercial production of dairy and livestock products and feed crops, the effects of this new competition will inevitably be felt keenly throughout other farming regions. "So you see that this problem of reopening and increasing market outlets for cotton is-not inerclv a regional problem. It is a national problem of vast concern to industry, to agriculture, to labor and to business, generally, throughout tho entire country." The First Mc Wiping his face. Secretary Sayre sits down. He is followed by briefer and more familiar speakers, until most of the crowd have sought cooler haunts. Only the members of the Delia Council and its.'.invited'guests remain to meet In .mid-afternoon in the college auditorium where the National Cotton Council is being launched. Again Oscar Johnston holds the floor. He Is telling his five hundred listeners that In Washington there is no one accredited and authorized, to speak for cotton; that there has been no concentration of effort at any time in behalf of the cotton producers, no one in the nation's capital whom legislators can consult to get the actual views of the distant cotton Interests. But, he reiterates, such -views, such effort could be obtained by • the formation of a National Cotton Council, with statfe organizations, county subdivisions and community groups in the fourteen .stales producing cotton in any quantity. "When we do this, gentlemen, wo will have the voice that we need so badly nob only In legislation but In other .Blatters, New uses for cotton must be developed. Present consumption must )« increased by intensive, scientific advertising. World markets inusl be enlarged. "The voice of cotton has been as soft as its lint and as low as ts price. We must speak through a tnagnavos If we are lo be heard. Man power and money power will do it. Assessments ol ten cents a bale on an 18,000,000 bale crop vould give a national cotton organization right now $1,800,000 to finance on adequate coltoj) cam- laljjn. And we would still not he loing half of what rayon is dong ..." Repeatedly driving home his arguments, he stresses trade agreements, organization, research, de- clai-cs that no agricultural bill will 'unction for five successive years vIOiotit amendment. And fervont- y In conclusion, Oscar Johnston ,ell.s his fellow cotton men that :he Colton Belt ufiist unify be- ilnd colton for its very existence. $9,000 IVom Mississippi His "Thank you" Is lost In applause. On the front-row,. Govcr- lor Hugh White of Mississippi, wiidoibusly deliberate, Is on his :<?et. Behind him, a score of olh- crs sland, waving llielr hands or calling for recognition. Mlssl.islp- pl's White promises a stale ap- oroprtotlon of $9,000—which »s to (he first sum ever appropriated by n Southern slide lo "organize colton"—and says he will approach other Southern governors to secure similar amounts. A dozen men move the formation of the National Cotton Council of 'America. Prom the floor endorsement comes from John Peltey, President of (he National Cottonseed Products Association, Secretaries of Agriculture Hollon of Mississippi, Goodman- of Tennessee. Wilson of Louisiana. Assistant Secretary of Agriculture Harry Brown joins In unqualified approval, and wilh him Gamer Lcsler, President of the National Ginncrs Association, Nor- rls Williamson of Louisiana, president of the- |»lont American Cotton Cooperative Association, imd C. A. Bertel of New Orleans, president of the National Compress and Cotton Warehousing Association. A westerner, George Payne, representing the Irrigated Cotlon Growers Association of the Southwest, prnises Oscar Johnston's lender- ship and promises the active support of his group. Ivy Dilgggn, Southern Regional Director of the AAA, gives approval as do Houg- 1ns Brooks of Memphis, director of the American Cotton Shippers Association, J. Frank PSrlcr, President of the Tennessee Farm Bureau, nomep 'Short, President of the Arkansas Farm Bureau,' and Ransom Alrtrlch, President of Uie Mississippi Fnrm Bureau. By acclamation, Oscar Johnston is designated temporary "chairman of the Infant Cotlon Council of America. . Named temporary secretary is RheoivBlakc, the young Virginian who s left a , \yest Virginia v.tUlly company's -advertising department to-become'managing secretary of the Delta Council, and who hns been devoting most of his time lo tlie many details of this Important first meeting. Outline of 1'nrposc Now the chairman Is reading Jits outline' of purpose and suggested organization from one of the mimeographed sheets which have been the audUor- (Cwitlnued itCM Page 5) I Sup. Owner Suj). Owner Lot JIM 103019311938, Unknown J. S. llcward 1 & 2 ' 1.20, Peoples Bldg I/) an l.ol Blk 193G1337 1838 Sup. Owner Lot Rile 1930193V IMS Lula Howard 3 It. B. Teasley 4 (Jhickasawba Wolf Allan B W > ' ail Addltlun . .00 B. B. Lasliol 8 10 ,60 ,00 ,00 Same 3 to ,1 inc A 6.00 0 00 MO Same N!4 8 A .CO .CO .00 .60 E. E. Pope 1.CO dislribulcd Jtlvrougli ium. - ; , v "The National Cotton Council Is .o act as llio coordinator of the activities of the various groups within the colton industry, and to promote the concentration of ef- 'orls of these various groups with ;hc following objectives: "A: To Increase the consumption of cotton and cottonseed products ill known uses by Intensive, scientific and widespread advertsilng. "B To encourage scientific research In the effort to develop .'.lew uses for cotton products. "0. To sponsor legislation designed to promote consumption of cotton and cotlon-seed products throughout Ihc world and lo combat legislation which discrim'males against or penalizes the use of cotton nnd cottonseed In American markets. "b. To abstain from any action in which tile five primary raw cotton interests are not in accord." Into the skeletal plan life lins been breathed. The representatives of the cotton groups present nn'.l the Delta Council members unnni- mouslj endorse the program and its tentative organization outline which gives each slate a minimum of five representatives, one from each of the five related cotton en- lerprises. The firsl meeting of the National Cotton Council is sot for August or September In Memphis: Arabs and Jews In Acre Fortress Find They Can Cooperate JERUSALEM (UP)—Thc rats of Acre prison have brought togc ! .:ier In common cause Arab rebels who want to oust the British from Palestine and Jcn'U'i revisionists who ivniH to establish a Jewish state en both sides of Die Jordan. Their common cause is not againit the rats, us one might think, but against the watchfulness of their Jailers, nnd the rais have ee|i friends and allies. So cordial 1ms been this undcr- slandtng thai numbers of highly' respectable persons on both sides of (he •Palestine dispute, who have been Imprisoned for political reasons, have speculated as to whether Arab-Jewish cooperation might not be possible along oilier lines as well. A young Jewish hothead who has Just been released Ironi Acre prison told this corrcspandcnl how llic Jews and Arabs combined to outwit Ihc British authorities about their cigarettes. Warden Bootleg Cigarettes "It's easy to get cigarettes in prison," he suit!. "We always find '.winters who are prepared to sell us piastre packets of cigarettes for ten or fifteen piastres a packet. The trouble is keeping them, because we are searched twice daily. The same warder who sold the packet will be prepared lo confiscate It as soon as he gets orders to search. "Do you know how wo smoke in prison? Everybody lakes n whiff and passes on thc cigarette to the next man. We figure there are 14 whiffs lo a cigarette, because when wo wliilf we whin long and deep. By Ihe lime four or five of us have whiffed Ihere are usually signs of clgarclte smoke which may calch Ihe nllenUon of the prison inspector, although we do our best to clear thc nlr by fanning. "Naturally, our main problem is lo find a hiding place for Ihc cigarettes. Thanks to thc ingenuity and the- patient ro3peration of thc Arab and Jewish races, we have succeeded. And if you want to know. It Is all done by kindness to animals. Ideal Helical for Ituls "They say Acre prison >was' IlrsL put up by Hie Crusaders. Ahyway, in an old building like that there are n lot of rnt and mouse h mid no cals. If we were to calch ftny exits': there, we would wring their necks, because many of us Used lo spend our time .making pets of the ml.? and mice. I "We noticed '.lliat Ihey.are just like human beings. Every rut or mouse has Us own particular hole, Just ns we have houses, and they .icvcr make a mislakc ns lo Ihe iioles by which they enler or leave Ihe cells. "One of my friends, thc fellow who discovered this, suggested put- ling It- (o use. When our rat, would become friendly enough' to play with us, we would wrap up a few cigarettes nnd lie lliem on its back. The rat, we knew, was our friend and wasn't going to lell any warders. The only thing was lhat we had to be sure it would, come back with our clgarelles when \ve wanted them. And we knew we could depend on it for lhat if we put a little of our dinner In tlie right place. Arabs Teach Jews "It needed a little experimenting, and that's where our Arab friends were useful, because they were more accustomed to Ihe animals Ihiin we were, although now our boys can handle them just ns well as Ihc Arabs. "We worked up a perfect Icch- nique. We know just how many cigarctlcs each rat can carry, and where it prefers us (o attach them. Every rnt we find ha,? Its .individual preferences In this respect, and ivc know just what each rat expects as reward. They haven't all 301 Die same laslcs. you see. "But I cnn tell you one thing. If J. L. Tyrone 1 '•> » •» 1-20 1.20 Jane Koblnsoii B 10' t t» .20 J. It. Fisher l&? J! 2.002.00 2.00 Mnry Phillips JtoV' 11 " son II & |2 u 2.00 J. A. Wfbb 5 & l! 12 l.CO l.CO 1,00 Lame McLhmon 5 & Wii 4 w - 90 ' 90 Mrs. Lyn Gooch J 1 15 - 80 J. S. Driver S25'J5 15 .40 Clilfliasawt/* Gardens Chas. Phi!ll|is 3 & \ T.. E. McBride C'cslfn _ Z. B. Harrison 4 <£ 5 .10 ,32 .IG -90 15 - 30 , Male I)anl/' ls Aildlllon W. I,. WilEht 3 1 .CO .60 .CO Jim Howard 4» & l '-20 Maltle SU'lfl 7 Jno. Also)) 12 & Jeff Waters 11 & ™ ' '3 '-20 1.20 1 20 ' 1.20 Arms Workers In Japan Enjoy New Affluence TOKYO (UP)—Booming muni- tion industries are bringing pros- pcrily and luxuries lo a class ol Japanese previously restricted to the dreary, poverty-stricken life of the slums. A Tokyo department store recently received an order for two "extra-special" easy chairs. The delivery truck driver was given an address localcd In one of the city's worst slum areas. However, the chairs were delivered to a munitions employe who had long dreamed of being able to sit In the same kind of chairs used by his boss. In Tokyo and Osaka bars and amusement places, munitions workers are flashing hundred yen bills and enjoying themselves In a manner unprecedented here. Meanwhile, considerable jealousy has been aroused among white cellar employes who arc still plugelng along on subsistence salaries while prices are rising sharply. Police authorities are considering placing special taxes on munition worker: to lessen the tension. Head Courier News want ads. the Palestine want lo have. prison authorities real revolt, let them try lo plug our rnt-holcs." ft " Mattic Y*» E!i /* Unknowf 1 C. D T' YOm l )Son N C oilvc R/ Heal °" O. E 40' °' N 50' 16 Wilson 8 Smith 13 Vienna Factory Packs Up, Goes To Australia CANBERRA, Australia (UP) — Australia is to become the site of the newest, up-to-date, streamlined form of emigration. From, the old-time hardy pioneer family or the rugged individualist who emigrated from n mother country, Australia soon is to receive the emigration of an entire Industry, It is an Austrian glove manufacturing concern that will emlgrnlc en masse with everything from it-s board of directors, skilled technicians, machinery and equipment down lo the latest gadget for glove making. Thc company will Install itself complete in a factory here, using only Australian materials and supplementing Its personnel when that becomes ncce-ssary with Australian operatives at award wages and conditions. The firm has been forced to leave Vienna as a result of the Nazi regime. Experts attached to the firm first examined the Australian supplies of leather nnd tanning, which.they found to their satisfaction, and „_ then recommended thc mass emi-1 C. J. Evrurd gratton of tlie entire Industry. LlnnW " Unknown 5 2 .(id .CO Susie Carr C lo 0 " lc 2 2 - 40 2 - M 2X0 Unknown 10 2 .40 .40 .CO Dials I* 1 Addition Mrs. Mary VivU 1 " 1 Sf M. Gray 1 2.00 7 1.00 1.00 1.00 J. D. Driver 'k 15 1S Library Asm, " lu - 80 -^ MrS 'N^""0 3,20 H 10 .80 Clyde Rcblnson w '" J. W. Bauer Ng' a ^ ^ Davis 2 nd Addition' Mary Jarbro S 1 ''-' 3 N. Johns S3 5 '' " 6 Addition 3 2 iame Ex N 45' Tf<" ' Same Same W',4 8 & ft »; Anderson & Ci Mahnn Eslale Davis S. Sallba 8 Myrtle Mattlu' 13 & tt Lucy Averltt 2 & \V C. J. Evrnrd E',4 3 & P" 4 3 W. A. Edivar-" 5 5 - 3 Dr. J, A. Salil> a 8A .CO .05 .05 .GO 4 .05 4 1.17 4 4 2.10 2.10 2.10 2 U 3 12 Wendell Phillips N 1 // 1 12 o. n. 1'iiiiiips 8Vi 7 & 8 12 Wendell Phillips E 5' NW 3 12 l/ollaudale Addition E. J, Hatley . 0 A .28 Unknown 5 .CO .60 E. D. Nebins B 1.40 1,40 1.40 B'1,40 1.40 1.40 R. M. Morris Est 0 15 1.40 1.40 1.40 ,30 Betty Allqy | Morris Eslale .CO .CO ,08 B. Parks 0 & 7 B H. M, Ciitlr-r 11 C E, Todd WS13. " all 4 E Tom Smith 1 to 4 Sue P J. E. VIckers 5 P j. B. Walker 1 P ,58 Hetty Alley S 1 /. 3 & 10 t B 1.40 1.40 1,40 8 B 1.41' 1.40 1.40 B 1.40 1.40 Dan Davis 3 O. Shonyo 1 & 4 I/oro Thompson C !_,. Brown tt Walter Hurst- - and Shonyo Addition F 1 . Johns 10 B 1.40 1.40 1.40 W. G. Baker 17 B ].40 j,40 1,40 East Ark. Lbr. Co. 19 B 1.40 J. S. Mntlhew.s 20 B 1.40 1.40 1.40 .28 ,28 .28 K ' S. Cash 2 C 1.40 1.40 1.40 Ida Hicks 5 C 1.40 1.40 .42 .42 .42 i T. W. EskrUlge 9 O 8.00 8.00 1.12 1 Unknown S 29' 14 C 1.1C 1.10 LIB .28 .28 .281 r. J. O'Brien Subdivision ..23 IZeph O'Brien Sup. Owner Ix>( nik 19361937 1538 .20 .20 .20' ,20 .20 Mack ciiuney 2 14 Ruby Lemons 3 14 Percy Smith 5 14 Gallic Smith, 6 14 Amanda Langfordl 14 .20 20 Gus Gray 1 & 2 15 C. E. Nabors 3 ID .20 Clccio Ogle Est,. 5 15 .20 Amanda Langtord7 15 .20 Edllli Green 3 10 .20 .20 .20 Norman Baker 1, 2 n Dave ft Birdie I'inkey 13 O. Slionyo 1C 1 2 ,20 .20 .20 .20 Eugene Pcrlont Will Slstrimk Win. Barlley 3 & 4 2 Evelyn Stewart, 5 0. C. Collier 7& 8 W. C. & D.Clark8 O. Shonyo 12 Mamie Jones 13 Arthur Rogucmore 14 Will Slstrimk O. Shonyo Alne Pearson liobcrt Mallory Esther Johnson Johnnie Sownrd .40 .20 ,20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 ,20 .20 ,20 .40 .20 .20 .20 .40 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 Meltie Soward1&8 3 IM 3 •* Same 8 & E W. B. Crews J S 2-3 13 Prank Mahan Equitable B ' Assn Reeves Allen <' » 3 2.80 2.40 1.80 1,80 1.80 1.80 2.07 2.07 1.60 E 10' 7 fe L 7A 4 .22 .22 .22 Mnblc Watts a 1 BA 4 1.33 11 4 1.08 ].20 1.20 R. A<1«> 12 4 1.20 1.20 L20 Mrs. D ' 10 Sunshine SW 1 Mrs. D. H. Allle Slsk Davis H. T. Bryan 5 2.40 •1ft 12 5 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20,1.20 1,20 Subdivision 4 10 1.40 Addition- -• L. M.ROSS fHfl'7.81 .08 .08 .08 J. C. TIlUll" 8 " E 10' of 5 5B' fi 2 .01 .01 L. S. Brisc<> c W 40' Of « 68 ' G Snmo S5 f)'7&8 2 n.irrls Addition .03 .03 .08 .08 Z. B. Harri stm , 14 inc. 1 Addition 5.GO Henry Sln E. D. GIllcO Ben H. 1.40 1.-10 1.40 1.40 2.40 2.40 1.20 Lena Mae E H. S. Hear' 1 0| Sam Roe m ' rns S' 7 & 8 1.27 \V 33' 8 3 2.fil 52.402.402.40 E. Armstrong 3 & 4 Mrs. Maw) Henry Haf 1 llearn ' Mrs. John f> Myrtle Si' vier J. Jacksoi' 5 2.80 Addition 2.80 & 8 B 1.20 1.20 C A .60 1 Perry Addition stead 4 2 .GO .60 .60 5 2 .60 .CO 7 3 .CO Place Addition Minnie R E T ' John WhJ tsitl 2 4 10 11 13 Ivy W cf awfot(I East Ark. Co - * Ivy w Crawford 55 1, 8 & 13 P. T. E!< Icr 16 Mrs. Dora P-Davis 5 1 2 2 2 2 4 Joe A vfcClurc ' ^ & B',i 1 4 L G TV 0 " 1 ' 15011 9 4 J P 'Livingston Ex W 20' th c N W )0 * L G Tr' onl P so " W20' N W.. 1 ?..* Unknowr' * 1.20 .60 .60 .60 .90 .GO .60 .CO .60 .GO .CO .60 .CO .60 .CO .CO .CO .60 3.00 .60 .CO .60 .60 .60 .60 .00 .60 .60 .30 .30 12 4 .00 .90 .00 .90 .GO C L T/intzenlch 9 5 .GO .GO .00 H & 15 5 '- 20 '- 20 ' 20 7 'o 11 inc fi 3.00 Mrs M <? Hnrl)cr 12 6 .60 .60 .CO Same Baker Q. p. M. L E. M. £oppedge ' ~ B. B. c. A. East J. w. .1C .20 .60 .GO .60 Tant rk. Lbr. C 1 & Williams If L Chambers 5 9 East Harry ua Unknown Clcorg£ John Co. 6 9 7 0 11 to 8 1.20 1.20 1.20 .60 .GO .GO 1.20 1.20 .60 .60 60 .60 8 .60 . .60 .60 -.60 .60 .60 16 inc. 9 3.GO 3,60 3,60 1 10 3 10 4 10 .60 5 10 6 10 7 10 .CO .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .00 .60 O. Shonyo Ella | Jackson Walter Davis Ci'jero Ogle Est. 13 14 15 2 & 3 4 5 7 Mlljie Harvey O. Johnson Collie Gray O. Shonyo Jim Lowe Pcnrl Matthews Win. Jones 3 & 4 Eli/a Warren 7 0. Shonyn ••!! Mary Parnell 12 zcllncr Thurman 13 O. Shonyo L. Bell J. M. Ferguson Lydla Moron Evelyn Settlex J. W. Floyd Ira Jones George Taylor 5 & G Lula White, 7 Mose Wells 8 14 15 1C 1 2 3 4 .20 ,20 .20 .20 .40 .20 .20 .20 .20 .40 .20 .20 Ito 11 inc 1 0.60 6.60 6.00 W. C. Wood 4 & 5 2 1.20 1.20 1.20 Ark-Mo Power Co. 7 Pei\rl Mann 10 Zepli O'Brien 11 G. C. Dyslnger 14 & 15 17 19 20 .GO .CO .60 Emma Oiler G. L. Williams Mrs. Autrv 2 1.20 1,20 1.20 2 2 2 .60 Original Survey .CO .60 .CO .00 G. E. Cross 20 Henrietta Goad 21 & 22 L. E. McFall 29 J. F. Smith 36 & 37 Equitable Bidg & Loan 50 1,00 1.00 1.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 2.40 1.00 1.00 O. B. Freeman 51 1.00 1,00 1.00 C. W. Gosnell 53&S4 J. P. Smith Z. T. Gnines 55 61 .20 .40 ,20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 Mrs. W. M. Phillips .201 - ,' 62 .20 S. C. Craig G4&G5 .40 O. E. Stewart 67 .20' J. H. Roney 73 Joe C. Watson 74 •Sam '.Grimes 85 J. T. Alford 87, 88 & 89 l.CO .80 .80 .80 .00 .80 ,80 .80 1.60 1.60 l.GO ,80 .80 .20 .20 ..20 .20 .20 .GO .60 Park Addition 1.80 1.80 1.80 .CO .60 .CO Win. C. Wood 2 O. E. Wright 3 Mrs. R.A.McLeodfi A. T. Earl 7&8 1 J.20 1.20 1.20 .60 .CO .60 .60 Mrs. C. W. Gosnell 3 .20 .20 .20 .20 ,20 ,40 .20 .401 Connie Smith 4 .201 Unknown 5, 6 & 7 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 .20 •20| A | Katie Jones 11 Naomi Shipp 12 O. .Anderson 14 Joe Pine 15 c .20 .20 .20 Irregular IMs Section 15-15-11 Creamery Package Co. Lot 10 NW 48.5248.52 Irregular Lots Section 16-15-H 0. M. Lear Lot G NW 2.40 2.40 2.40. W. B. Hall Est. ,-• -. ' ' Lot. 7 NW 3.20'3.20 3.20 J. C. Buchanan Lot 0 NW 2.00 P.-.E. Rogers Lot-12 NW 2.40 Morse & Klrshner Lot 1C NW .40 Katie McLeod Lot 17 NW .40 .40 .40 R: W. Catt Lot 22 NW .80 .80 .80 Will McParland Lot 23 NW 1.20 1.20 R. W. Scott Lot 24 NW ,81} .80 .80 Irregular Lots Section 17-15-11 Jnines T. Alle.s ;4 .20 acres .23 .23 Pluinie M. Pride •,• 36 1.38 acres . 1.15 O; W. Coppedge ': - 37 .22 acres .23 .23 Unknown 44 1.19 acres .69 .C9 American United Life Ins. Co. Mrs. .60 .60 Alvin E. Sullivan 11 & 12 3 1.20 1.80 Sallie Adams Est. 1 4 .CO .60 .CO P. C. Rolhrock N 1-3 8 & 9 A. D. Dalan 14 .40- .40 S. L. Forsythe 1 & 2 fi 1.20 1.20 1.20 Gordon Cummings 9 6 .80 Lee -Musgrave 12 Q Mary Jane Drake 5 7 Equitable Bldg & Loan N 100' 28 .36 .36 Mrs. Edith Johnson N 80' C & 7 8 .C8 .G8 .68 J. P, I'ride Subdivision 38 Joe Black 3 17 .19 ,13 Ruddle Heights Addition C. L, Nabors 7 l Unknown 4, 5 & C 2 .60 .60 .20 .20 .20 .20 .40 .20 ,20 .20 .19 .38 .19 Jack F. Robinson 7, 8 & 9 F. A. Robinson 10 & 11 2 .40 R. E. Blaylock 14 &. .20 .00 2 .CO .CO .60 A, Wallace R. N. Hill D. G. Stout Jane Bradshcr Mrs. Gosnell 15 9 2 3 4 5 2 3 J. W. Moore American Bldg & Loan 4 fi .20 ,20 .20 Lizzie P. Criggcr 5 e .20 A, G. Wheat 6 T. W. Jackson 7 George Webb 8 Daisy Hill 9 & 10 Lizzie P. Crlgger 1 Daisy R. Hill7&8 Harry Weedman 2 H. W. May J. W. Prazicr Joe Martin 5 & A. G. Wheat 9 to 12 inc. 10 A. G. Wheat 2 10 4 10 6 10 .40 .80 Sup. Ovntr Lot Blk I93C 1937 1938 F. Cooper 9 c .16 Punk WHIls Subdivision Westbrook 1 .48 ' .48 16 ' Same Same . 2 .48 .48 .48 3 .48 Town yf Yarbro M. C. Flowers 3 1 1.00 1.00 1.00 Mitchell & Bollard 1 2 , 1,00 M. C. Ploweis 7 2 i.oo Minnie Sadler 9 2 1.00 1.00 1.00 Yarbro Waiehouse Co. 7 3 4.00 4.00 All persons and corporations Interested In said lands, are hereby notified that they are required, by law, to appear within four (4> weeks nnd make defense to said suit, or the same will he taken as confessed, ami final judgment will be entered, directing the sale of said lands for the purpose of collecting said taxes, together with tlie payment; of Interest, penalty and cost allowed by law. HARVEY MORRIS, Clerk of said Court. By: EhVabeth Ely the, D. C. NOTICE OF COMMISSIONER'S SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, as Commissioner of •0|the Cliancery Court for the Chlck- asawba District of Mississippi County, Arkansas, acting under authority of a decree rendered In said 1 to 5 Inc. 11 J.OO 1.00 1.00 .20 .20 .20 .30 .40 .40 .20 .20 .40 .40 •20 court'on April 14, 1939, In a cause .20 .20 wherein American Security Com- .20 .20 pany was plaintiff and Otis Goza, .40 .40 Virginia Goza, Claude Cooper, Trustee, Underwood Commission .80 .80 Company of East-St. Louis, Illi; nois, A. W. (Gus) Smith, and Bar- E. F. Wilson 1, 2 & 3 12 .60 D, M. Eaton 4 12 Sudbury Addition P. A. Robinson 8 & E'/J 9 2 1.20 Sunnysidc Addition Eugene Perloat C. Ogle Esl. J.-F. Province B. E. Roberts2&3 Elijah Jelks Sarah Buckner ' 7 Candace Fitz 5 John Irvin 2 & 3 O. Shonyo 4 Lee Irvin 5 & C. Ogle Est. G. W. Murphy 1.20 1.20 .CO .60 .60 .CO .CO 4 1.20 1.20 1.20 Pluinie Pride 3 A .23 .23 mericau United Life Ins. Co. I 4 A Edna Y. Husband 7 \A Fowlkes, Latin & Gordon 8 A Flora M. Trimue 9 A Realty Purchase Co. Ada Luster 47 5.38 acres 15 .21 acres 5.81 .20 .20 Enst Arknnsas Lbr. Co. 17 .20 acres W. F. Cannon 24 Lot Mnrt Butler 30 .22 acres .20 American United Life Ins. Co. 31 .43 acres Same 48 2.22 acres James Addition .20 .52 .20 .40 1.80 .40 Walter Waddy 1 E. Hnrber E','_> 2 Milton Sternbcrg : Eli 2 & W'.t 3 B .80 J. W. Bader 2 C .80 S. Brewer 5 C .80 S. C. Alexander 6 & N 1-3 7 C 1.07 M. i'. Holly 52-37 C .53 .53 Jolly Addition J. W. • Mnlone 2 .20 .20 .20 W. O. Blue 5 .20 Jones Addition G. G. Calidill i 13 & 14 1 2.00 Judd Addition E. Halslcad 6 .18 .18 M. Halslcad 7 .18 .18 A. Halslead 8 .18 .18 l.cc Subdivision George M. Lee Same 3 & Nannie Poole Sailie Hancock Geo. M. Lee Clias. Bedford .28 .28 .28 .56 .23 .28 .28 .'28 .28 .28 15&16 Lunsfonl Aildilion Darrall Lunsford 3 2 .56 1.00 Marsh. Addition W. H. McCall I to 4 inc. 1 1.00 Know Craig C 1-3 3 & 4 2 .83 .93 .93 G, C. Hawks 3 & 4 3 3.60 A. M. Tale 5 & 6 3 2.80 Mrs. L. M. Burnett 10 & W!i II 4 2.10 Dr. E. V. Hill E',4 11 & all 12 4 Myrtle G. Martin 1 5 2.10 1.40 1.40 S. C. Moore 25 1.40 1.40 C. E. Hawkins 4 5 1.40 1.40 1.40 Miller & Grcenlcc Addition Fannie Huffman 6 2 .60 Miller & Grcenlcc Subdivision Powell Lime & Cement Co. N 1-3 W!4 3 5. L. Webster S 17'.i' 3'i Morris Addition Mrs. W. T. Matthews 1 & 2 A .17 .60 Pliimie Pride 10 17 Mrs. Mary Brogden 19 B C. E. Cobb ' 5 & C Unknown 10 ,23 .23 .23 .23 .23 .23 .23 .46 .23 .23 .23 .23 Lige Bryant R. Small C. R. Bell C. Ogle Est. O. Shonyo G. P. Williams C. Ogle Est Annie Walker 10 & 11 A. Jones 12 G. F. Williams 13 C. R. Bell 14 Robert Small 3 & 4 C. Ogle Est. 5 Wallace Lucius G .60 GO 1.20 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .CO .GO Son Mansfield Company, doing business as Manila Lumber Company, were defendants (cau.se No. 6855), will, al Ihe front door -of the Court House In Blythevllle, Arkansas, on June 3, 1939, oiler for sale to the highest and best bidder upon a credit of three months Lots 94 and 05, Block 8, town of Manila, Arkansas. The purchaser will be required to execute bond with approved security and a lien will be retained upon the property until the purchase price is paid. Witness my hand as such Commissioner this May G, 1939. HARVEY MORRIS Commissioner in Chancery. Shane & Fendler Solicitors for Plaintiff. .00 .CO .GO .60 .GO .60 .60 5 1.20 1.20 1.20 .00 .60 .60 .60 1.20 1.20-1.20 5 5 5 6 C 6 G 6 G 6 .CO .60 .CO .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .80 .60 ; .60 .60 .'2t W. B. Mays lltoHincC P. M. Pride 15 C .23 .23 Mrs. Ed McMahon ID & 20 C .4G Unknown C D ,23 .23 J. L. Hyde 1 & 2 B .43 P. M. Pride 19 E .23 J. A. Turner 22 E .23 .23 .23 J.-is. T. Allen 10 P .23 Jletrecca Patterson Subdivision Rebecca Patterson I to 16 inc. 1 4.16 4.16 4.10 Dave Reynolds 1 2 .26 Rebecca Patterson E 1-3 2, 3 & C 2 .26 .26 .26 Clyde Sower C 1-3 2, 3 & C 2 .26 .26 .26 Rebecca Patterson ' W 1-3 2, 3 & 6 2 .20 2G .26 Same 52 .26 .26 .2G Kicllards Addition Ida T. Minyard 6 E .80 .80 I. B. Stewart 10 F .80 .80 .80 Clyde Kobinson Addition S. Joseph 8, 9 & 10 2 fcltfiu Itnuins'tiu Addition Mary & Walter Lillie Collins E. Williams Elijah Jelks Jennie Hays . . ._. ._. ... O. Shonyo';' 14 8 ,60 ' .CO .60 A. Johnson 15& 16 61.201.20 C. R. Bell 1 ft C. Ogle Est John Taylor .23 .46 .23 .92 John Taylor 2.40 Turner 1, 2 & 3 Gordon Wright fi 1.80 1.80 .90 .90 Henry Adams 9,10,11 4 1.80 1.80 1.80 O. A. Taylor Will Sales Delia Bella Sarah Phillips Eula Buchanan Mary Turner J. S. Oliver 12 13 4 7 8 9 14 ,60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .GO .60 .60 Ida Hubbard 15,1G 5 1.20 1.20 1.20 J. H. Hendrix 1, 2 G 1.20 1.20 1.20 Chns. Spencer 4,5 6 1.20 1.20 White 6 & 7 G 1.20 l!20 1.20 W. C. LCggcttI], 12 G L. W. Haraway 13, 14 & 15 G J. R. Roberts 1C 6 .60 Eugene Wright 18 6 .60 Bennle Chapman 12 & 13 7 Will Ross 2 8 Mary Cox 5 & 6 8 Jon. Atkins 7 & 8 8 .34 John . Barr 9 8 Jack Glllls 3 & 4 9 Fred Whimper 7, 8 9 ,34 1.20 1.20 L80 .60 .60 G. C. Brown John King Amelia Sherol 2 10 3 10 6 10 ,17 Dave Mahan 8,9, 10 10 .51 Morgan Kimbro 11 10 .17 J. & L. Mann .34 .34 .17 .34 .34 .17 .17 .51 .17 1.20 .17 .34 .34 .17 .34 .34 .17 .17 .17 .51 .17 Hiram Taylir Isiah Truss 1 lo 4 inc. 11 I. Anderson 5 II R. & I. Johnson 6 11 7 11 9 11 J. F. Smith 1 & 2 12 3 12 5 12 6 12 7 12 8 12 .68 .68 Ada Huffman Ike Wells 4 Lizzie Moss John Holmes B. Dumas Shirley Hamilton 9 12 Call Reynolds 10 12 .19 .19 .38 .38 .19 .19 .19 Marie Baker J. H. McCorkle 3 & 2 13 4 13 Llge Wilson 6 13 Chns. Campbell 7 13 2.40 2.40' C. Simmons a 13 .19 .19 .38 .19 .19 .19 .19 .19 .19 .38 .19 .19 .17 .17 .17 .17 .38 .19 .33 ,19 .19 .19 .19 .19 .38 /Fannie Adams Fannie Allen Amandii Minor ; Tom Matthews 1.20 .CO .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .GO .CO .60 .GO G&7 1 C. Ogle Est Blythcville Lbr. Co. 8 1.20 1.20 1.20 9 .60 .60 .60 Will McClellan 3 & Lucy Brown Robert Small 2 9 .60 .60 .60 1.20 1.20 .60 .60 NOTICE OF COMMISSIONER'S SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, as Commissioner of the Chancery Court for the Chick- Qsawba District of Mississippi County, Arkansas, acting under authority of a decree rendered in said court on April 14, 1939, in a cause wherein American Security Company was plaintiff and Otis Gozn, Virginia Goza, Claude Cooper, Trustee, Will Jolllff, E. C. Fleeman and Mrs. E. C. Fleeman were defendants (cause No. G854), will, at. the front door of the Court House in • Blythevllle, Arkansas, • on June 3,'1939," offer for sale to thc lii'ghcst" and best bidder upon a credit of three months Lots 5 and 6. Block 2. Parkview Addition to the town of Manila, Arkansas. The purchaser will be required to execute bond with approved security and a lien will be retained upon Die property until the purchase price is paid. Witness my hand as such Commissioner this May 6, 1939. HARVEY "MORRIS Commissioner in Chancery. Shane & Fendler Solicitors for Plaintiff. Spradlcy Subdivision F. E. Reeves E pt 2 & S pt 3&4 1.80 Sunrise Addition G. C. Hawks E 25' 3 1 H. C. Adams 7,8,9 2 Toler Subdivision Sarah Mingle C Vick's Subdivision East Arkansas Lbr. Co. 1 West End Subdivision .60 .83 3.00 1.00 Unknown 1 Gus Boose 5 & 6 7 8 Unknown Effe Johnson G. Hollings .60 .60 .60 1.20 .60 .60 10, 11 & ]2 1 1.80 Ben Pastel Chas. Meux Unknown Jno. King Bernie Fields E. Smith 21 & 16 17 18 19 20 22 .60 .GO .60 .60 .60 .60 1.80 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 1.20 Unknown 23, 24, 25 1 1.80 1.80 1.80 26 27 .60 .CO .60 .60 C. Lobcrg W. McCleve Eugene Robinson 30 & 31 Unknown 32 Unknown Unknown Blythevllle Lbr Co 2 Unknown 4, 5 & 6 2 1.80 1.80 1.80 Nathan Brittnln & 33 37 1 1 1.20 1 1.20 1.20 1.20 1 .60 .60 .60 2 .60 .60 .60 2 .60 .60 .60 Unknown Sara McLctnore Evelyn Sims Sally Flynn N. Northern & 8 10 II 12 15 2 1.20 1.20 1.20 2 .CO .60 .60 2 .60 2 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 .60 16 & 17 2 1.20 1.20 1.20 Willie M. Hudson 19 & 20 Ed Preacher 21 Anderson Bulllngs 22 2 1.20 .60 .60 .60 .60 ,60 Unknown 23, 24 & 25 2 1.80 1.80 1.80 Jane Poslcl 1&2 3 1.20 1,20 1.20 Unknown 3 & t 3 1.20 1.20 1.20 Will Titrrcll 5&S 3 1.20 1.20 1.20 1.20 .60 .60 E. Brittiln 8 & 9 3 1.20 3 .60 H. L. Atkins 16 H. F. Splcer 1, 2 & 3 4 1.80 1.80 1.80 Maggie Poslell 4\4 .60 .60 .60 Unknown 5 4 .60 ,60 .60 Isaac Daniels 6 & 7 4 Unknown 8 4 .60 .60 West Gale Kcplal 8 A. Ross Stevens ROSS Stevens W 15'9 A Donnle Henson A. B. Scott 5 2 .19 C. R. layman3&4 .19 L. V. llugliey 5 .10 .16 .32 .32 .16 .1C ,16 (Seal) 6-13-20 (Seal) 6-13-20 NOTICE OF COMMISSIONER'S SALE Notice is.hereby given that the undersigned, as Commissioner of tlie Chancery Court for the Chickasawba District of Mississippi County, Arkansas, acting under authority of a decree rendered in said Court on April 14, 1939, in a cause wherein American Security Company was plaintiff and Otis Goza, Virginia Goza, Claude Cooper, Truslee, Underwood Commission Company of East St. Louis, Illinois, and Barton Mansfield Company, doing business a.s Manila Lumber Company, were defendants (cause No. 6850), will, at the front door of the Court House in Blytheville, Arkansas, on June 3, 1939, offer for sale lo the highest and best bidder upon a credit of three montlis Lot 9G, Block 8, Original Survey of Manila, Arkansas. The purchaser will be required to execute bond with approved **- curity and a lien will be relained upon the property until the purchase price is paid. Witness my hand as such Commissioner this May 6, 1939. HARVEY MORRIS Commissioner In Chancery. Shane & Fendler Solicitors for Plaintiff. (Seal) 6-13-20 Demonstration Club News Notes Present Plays Two one act plays were prcs- enled by members of the Lost Cane Home Demonstration club at the Mtlllgan Ridge school Tuesday night. The plays had previously teen presented at the Lost Cane school. Proceeds from both programs went into the club treasury. Thc regular meeting day of the club has been changed from the fourth Friday of each month to the fourlh Thursday of each month. .19 .19 E. Carney San Bernardlus Mission at Awa- tobl on the Painted Desert in Hopiland was the first building erected by civilized man in Arizona. Ancient pueblo ruins still 8 C .18 .16 ,1C stand on, the site.

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