The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 29, 1939 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Friday, September 29, 1939
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Page 3
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$ ^^JHJ^Xj SEPTEMDR 29, 1939 New Boy 'God-King' Be Spiritual Leader Of Millions Since 1033, n strange search has been en In Tibet, land oS Lamnlsm—.1 hunt for the now Dalai Lamn, the living liudcllm. ImermlUera dispatches Inivc Wnl«l Ural the spiritual nnd tempornl ruler of several million subjects lias been named. George Pitch, Y. M. c. A. executive nl Chungking. China. anU correspondent lor NEA .Service and Uic Courier News, saw the new Dalai Lama en r:ute to his capital. He brings the first pictures of the chosen'one and the fascinating eye-wilner.s account of ilio adventure. * * » By GEORGE A. PITCH KEA Service Special Jorr«|ioudenl CHUNGKING, Chimi, Sept. 2D.— I o;n the first American lucky enough to soe the new Dalai lama "God-King" or Tibet. T; millions of followers, he is the reincarnation of (he soul of Ngawang Lopsane Tcupdcn Gyalso. I3lh Dalai Lama, who died in 1D33. The weird search ,of more than five years fer the late Dalai Lama's successor has ended; Die new ruler of Lamaism, a form of Buddhism, hns been chosen. I saw him nt the Kumbiim Lamasery In n:rtl'.west China, on his journey to Lhasa his capital. It happened while we were visiting this temple of the faith, next In Importance to that at Lhasa. Our attention was attracted by a sudden rush of people lc-ward a particular spot. A procession was coming our way It was headed by a lama, in fur regalia, carrying in his arms a young boy cf no more than five or six. AS Us approached, people prostrated themselves before him. Some pushed foranrc) io tcucli the clothcr of ihe child. Suddenly it dawned on me tlial ihis must lie the new Dalai Lam? en route to Lhasa, where he wili be introduced into the mysteries of the religicn. I reached in mv pocket for a film. Here was the chance of a lifetime! I made one shot, hastily starlec to turn the film for ar.othe'r. Tlr young Dalai Lama was within H feet cf me.. Then I discovered tha- I had, ih ' hiy^xcitement, loadc< the -camera: .with exposed film What a time for such a mistake BOOTS DON'T FIT , NEW DALAI LAMA Luckily, however, my Chinese colleague was on the spat with his camera, too. ; The precession hurriedly entered two-of "the temple buildings, where brief rites were observed, and then proceeded . to the courtyard. Here a gorgeous > palaivnuin —or mule litter—all in • yellow brocaded satin, .awaited. The boy, whose large boots had lo be held on while he was carried, was placed in the palanquin. His weeping mother and elder brother climbed into livo other litters behind him. Outriders In richls'-colorcd silks dashed up. Then (he procession was off on its perilous 1200-mile trek over the Tibetan plateau and across the Himalaya maintains to Lhasa—a trip that will'take al least two full, months to complete The lad was handsome, intelligent looking. HU must now relinquish all his family connections His life will be anything but safe No wonder his mother wept as (lit colorful procession started on the long jcurney to Lhasa. Until he attains his majority r.! IS-foiir abbots will act as ruling STANDARD TIRES • OTItnR SIZES AMD YOUR 010 TIRE 4.40-21 4.50-a . BLYTTTEVn-LR, (ARK.)'COtJRIEn NWS • [. ;~ •—— .—• '•• • •' •••••• ,••, •• • First Pictures Of New Dalai Lama THERE BfcUCfe CATION'S AMERICAN ROUNDUP ny IIKUCK o/viTO.v p Courier NVws Wa.>.iilii£(<m ' WASHINGTON, Scpl. 29.—Al Its regular .session In January, Congress probably will bo called on lo -|> Hie Unllcd slates Iftko aci- »«B« of Its new exiioN, Irnde opportunity in souiii AiiicrWa 'i'lie, .cpportiinlty Is 'simple 3,000,000 worth of uoocls In South America. Uncle Snm fan liavtf most mice It. can n n d „ ' Tiiis is the first picture ever taken of (lie new Dalai Lama—peasant !nd who will te spiritual leader of millions. Wearing boots so large that they have to be held in place, young Dalai Lama is carried to lemplo of Kumbum Lamasery—another "first" picture. (o nu . „,. -- U is npt, to l)o tough. The administration hns toen studying Hie problem nml luis exnm- incil scvcrnl JuiBjfc.sllons A lili'li government oillcliil siifjgcsls tlik Conjjrp.v; probably will be iiskcd lo do one <jt iwo wrings: Either make more money avall- iblc for financing the trade through existing hmclilnc'ry, cr set, up npiv machinery, willi ncfr nusmclnir /or nnmlllnjs it, in n now \i ; ny. .Tin- linmllest bit, of cklstlng machinery Is (lie .ExnaK-lmpoii flank. II 1ms loanable resources of $100 000,000, but rnosl. of Ihls ts 61- rcndy committed..In Hie sSiemUiiB- hmdliiK bill which wns Introduced last spring, n» added $100.000000 was nskcd for liid bank. The bank didn't t! cl It. ami II It Is now to finance greatly Incrcnscil Iraile wllh Soulh America. It will have to hnvc more money, GTs. CORPORATION SIAV KNTCK MARKET If new machinery Is lo be crctit- e<l, nu entirely iicw inclhod of electric plant and telephone service at Hie castle. The Kumbum Lnmosery, Ihe lamasery of "ton IhoiLinnd Imnsjes," whore we saw the slrange event, must be enormously wealthy. The entire ro:f of the central edlllRD Is overlaid with pure gold, reputedly an eighth of au Inch thick. The GO-foot ijnngc of Tsoiijf K'nba, Tibetan hero-rcfcnncr of the )5th centiiry, which slniids In Ihe Icmple, Is also gold-covered. Yellou', of course, Is (lit fallli's favorite colcr. Kumbum Is supposed lo have 4000 lanms In residence, nearly twice Ihe number nt the great lamasery of Wii-Tonu-Cho In Inner Mongolia,.which I vislled seme years njo linndlliiR the trailo mny bo Imll- «U«I oiic plnu which hns been constctciAi Is to sel U1 , „ government corjioiallon 1 0 bliy slirpHrs Soulh American coinmoillik'.s-col- fco. wheat an<| so cn-ln inuch lliu mnnnev llmt siirplns United Stales coimucullllcs me now liiiildlwl Tlils scheme mliiilUcitly would bn expulsive, nnd luis nixiusci ' Corimreice. • In the Dcpnrimcni of — wo-—... .., 10 iitiinv itllt'ct onus to ihe lending Soillh Anibr- Icnn countries, lahi))^ stocks of llu'll- raw innti'ilnls nti sociirlty. H should be esiilnlncd (hiil Ihtrd Is n (rood deal of fecllnt; in some ..-anil;; here dint none of thcsn proposals would be wise; I hat thu only .sound wny to handle iheJ problem would be lo lot Ihe South American nations mako Hit- approaches nnd to let all Iriidn UP handled In the nornm) wny. H is polnt«i out that the fefiitlnv ,-:iyIrij! poiver of South Alufi-lcn probufjly will be somewluU dm-ras- ctl, since EiiRlmul n|id h-anco mny be expected (o buy more honvlly of South American raw ninlorliils, thus making more itollnr exclnuiljC nvallable; and thai. In (iiiclltloii, world commodity prices .ire lip so tlnil Hie dollar volume of (lie Soulli American trado will Incrrn.s-o, AKTIKICIAI/ DOOM KKARKI) u y ADVISORS' Hut In Illo main, nccorilhiij to llila vlcwpoinl—whlch is strongly held In llio buslne.'W advisory section of the Commerce ncpnrimunt — nny nrtlHclal sllnnilus lo trndo Midi as a heavy extension of credits, vvbiild be likely lo bring nboul nn unhealthy boom which would be followed by nn nbrnpt collnp.se, with Uncle Snm holding n lot ot worthless Holes. In the lone run, u h digued, Soul)) Amcrlcn cnn Uike only such United sinics Kcn<i<i ns ({, | s n |jie lo pny for; If th n United sMwi buys more from South America it enn sell more to South America, but If It refuses to- buy more It won't soil so very much more unless It put.s up Us own money, A short lime ngo n number of Amnrlcnn nxpirUng companies discussed n plnn for sending tlwlr ue.U repi't'senlntlves (o South America mid putting on a whhlwliul nnlcs drive. They Iliuilly iib:indon«l ,lhe Idea, nmi t|io Commerce UejxiH- meiu wan just as well plcnsed. that when the Soulh Americans need Increased Supplies of Aincrlcnn products nml hnvc the money lo pny for them iliey will act, on their own hook, Ulfilil nmv, Commerce Dtipart- iiu'nl jict]ilu point out, the United Slates hn.s SU.pcr cent or Soulh America's trailc, which b Jn.st about 1 ," lr . 1 I»'««>i««e. aolmsny's midi inlkeu-of tmde drive mada h e ?, lr ?.', ! no ' illy Rt " 1C wrwnsc of ihe Biltish, not the Uhfteu qiatca, Rcati Courier News wont I've been HEADACHES nmianAi ot eulTtrtr! tat (K» Inn forly ycnr» have ujtd me to cs-tf hcnitnelicj mul othtr ael*5 li us m-urolali) i,<id niuuulnr ncdci. TJipy value mo liluhly be- j tome t (lUlcHy ullaj- fa ln, < W (hg nc'voa, noil iirltiK nlaxa- Hun, Sg I must lie eood. 1 cann In Oc, 30o, C GUARANTEED SATISFACTION ON Kuniaco Oil Stove Oil ' Tractor Fuel R.C.FARR Phones: Day 009, Night ^21 Dl.slrllmlor uF 1'IIH.MJ'S "SU" I'HOlJtJCTS Tins excusue photograph shows cavalcade ready to carry Dalai Lamn to Lhnsa,. his capital Mounted •iders escort mule Utters, 6 h W vn by arrows, which carry ruler ami h b family. Tie 01,^1 'ho,ten o nonmnenls, right, Hnvc been erected in memory of fnmo.n lamas regents. It is this council of regents which holds power between the passing of cue Dalai r.nma and the :hoice of another. The last Dalai Lama is said lo have been one of the few to have reached maturity. So:n alter his ascension in 1893, No. 13 got rid of his regents and his advisors. A Dalai Lama does not die- after 18, that is. He departs enrtli- ly existence. lie is supposed is name the infant into which his soul is transferred or to conjure up Ihe likeness of his successor in the sacred lake near Lhasa, (he forbidden city. Unfcrtmialely, No. 13 ."ailed to do this. Then began n hunt among un- numbered millions of Tibetans for a child born on the precise moment the late Dalai Lama left this life, an infant which wcnld show unmistakable signs o! divinity. The boy we saw, whose home town is reportedly In Kokonor, new called Chlnghnl province, will spend his days in a room ntop ihe Fatnln, his fortress-palace in Lhnsa. He will be put through a rigorous program cf education by the Panclicn Lama. Here, iii Chungking, a member of the Tibetan Commission tells me Hint the lad hns to face still another stiff test or his divinity, but we Here assured in Kumbum • nnd sluing that Ibis incumbent was the final choice. The fact that Ihe procession was already .slartlng for Lhasa would-be confirmation of this fact. It is said that many of the lamas believe that the 13tii Dalai Lama can never be reincarnated physically. They decry the late ruler's modern policies which led lo British pen trail en of Tibet, introduced such things as a hydro- Wert Optometrist 'HE MAKES 'EM SEE" Over Joe Isaacs' Store Phone 540 NOTICE Commissioners of Sewer District No. 2 have completed assessments and placed the books in the hands of Miss Ruth Blythe, City Clerk. Assessments. on all .property in said district may be paid without delinquency up to November 1, 1939. . . ' Commissioners of Sewer' District No. 2 SUPER SPECIALS Priced to Save You Money. Check and Compare These Values f\ ' V! pm;*: aw--'j h Worn) Flannufellt Sixes lliC (<) AViinVs '1S)C 'Villllt! Soil, cotton flnnnclcltc gowns Warm, soft plaids.* Made from —that wear and wear) Popular American cotton for service styles In stripes, solid colors. Me' FteccytliHvn I'laid fairs tto VSa 1 $«!<»! Famous Ilcallhsiinlsl Knit ol fine combed'cotton in full standard sizcu. No bindinj;! Hoys' imliinsnlls 370 T/ra name (dot meor,s SERVICSI ROCKFORD TYPE l.OYV Priced 4c Wards Heels and toes reinforced, feet comfortably seamless. Husky work socks. Strongly knif cotton. MONTGOMERY \V. Main rit. WARD Phone 076 Thrill Show PROPORTIONATELY LOW// PHtLLIPS MOTOR CO. Ellis Snipe*, Bndget Mgr. SlJr & VTalnnl Phone 810 Presenting Capt. Frank Gushing and his company of Death Defying Performers MARJORIEBAILEY*CAPTAIN MARS *MARY GORDON WoM ' s Highest Aerial Act The Human Cannon Ball Nation's Leading Auto Dare-Devil AtfTO GRASHES--ROLLOVERS--HURDLES AND SPINS OLE-HIGH WIRE-FIRE DIVES-DEATH DEFYING SLIDES lours Of Entertainment To Hold You Spellbound * rformances-Saturday Afternoon & Nile-Sunday Afternoon I t $3& OT ,4i^ Affk IS ^^h. ^^ mt mm^ ^m^. ^ — -- • ' ' I Gate Adm. Adults 25c CHILDREN FREE

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