Clarion-Ledger from Jackson, Mississippi on November 28, 1975 · Page 11
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Clarion-Ledger from Jackson, Mississippi · Page 11

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Jackson, Mississippi
Issue Date:
Friday, November 28, 1975
Page:
Page 11
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Advance ToChamps Elysees? Monopoly Title Leaves U.S. A-Friday, Nov. 28, 1975 Cl)f ClariomLcDacr 11 WASHINGTON (AP) - Boardwalk and Park Place, the Reading Railroad and Baltic Avenue were among the centers of attention recently in a World Championship of Monopoly that saw the title leave the United States for the first time. The 80-millionth Monopoly board produced was the scene of the final combat pitting capitalists from Ireland, England, Norway and Belgium for the third annual world FAA Uses New Tricks i For Safety MEMPHIS (AP)-The Federal , Aviation Administration is teach-Mng new tricks to computers to prevent airplances from colliding in midair. A computer-radar system at the FAA's Memphis Air Route Traffic Control Center has been taught to flash a warning to controllers when two airplanes are dangerously close. "The system tells the controller, 'If everything goes as it is at this moment, you're going to run out of separation'," said Ralph Grayson, data systems officer at the Memphis Center. Not too many years ago, harried controllers attempted to keep up with traffic with little more than their wits and a radar system that was by today's standards primitive. I Each airplane making its way along an airway on an instrument flight plan was tracked by hand across the radar screens. Controllers identified flights with "shrimp boats," plastic tokens pushed across the screen's surface in pursuit of the plane's "blip." , Computers do all that now, in ad- t dition to providing confirmation of j radar blip identification, automatic handoff of responsibility as the planes move from one controller's j area to another and providing real-? istic training for new controllers. The computer matches the radar s beacon code sent out by the air- planes with information stored in its memory. Grayson, who supervised installation of the Memphis system, said the computer-radar system predicts where aircraft will be in two minutes. When it decides the paths of two airplanes will cross, it warns the ; controller by flashing the planes' identification on the screen. In a recent demonstration at Memphis, the data blocks of two airplanes over central Mississippi ; began flashing. The controller t checked and found that an Air i Force B-52 bomber making a normal refueling rendezvous with a KC-135 tanker. There was no 4anger, but since the planes' courses were converging, it flashed I a warning. ' Grayson said the conflict alert system is in effect now for air- i planes flying above 18.000 feet. Eventually, he said, it will be broa- 1 dened to protect almost all air traf- t fie Snowmobile Ruling Expected In Week FRESNO, Calif. (AP) - A decision on whether to permit snowmobiles to use the unplowed Tioga Pass road in Yosemite National Park probably will be handed down within a week, U.S. District Court Judge M. D. Crocker said. At a hearing here Wednesday, Crocker said his decision would come shortly on a suit brought by the Sierra Snowmobiling Club against Leslie P. Arnberger, superintendent of Yosemite National Park. The suit seeks an injunction "which would in effect reopen 48 miles of the trans-Sierra roadway to the buzzing recreational vehicles during the winter months, when the road is closed to automobiles and .Other traffic Arnberger told Crocker he banned snowmobiles to minimize conflicts between their riders and cross-country skiers under powers granted him in a 1972 Executive ; Order prohibiting off-road vehicles in national parks. But club attorney Morris Futlick called the ban "arbitrary and capricious," claiming it was made "without sufficient public notice or public participation." The club contends confrontations with skiers occurred only two or three times. However, Asst. Superintendent John Good testified the "park has received many letters and other communications complaining about the noise and use of snowmo- : biles. championship of the game. Finalists were Roger Henderick, 26, a radio station publicist from Ghent, Belgium; John Mair, 26, a banker from Dublin, Ireland; Cato Wallo, 26, a fisherman from Oslo, Norway, and Ken Jones, 27, a local government official from Bolton, Lancashaire, England. They were competing for the Charles Darrow Cup, named for the inventor of the game first produced in 1933. Monopoly is a board game in which players buy, sell and trade property, charging each other rent, each attempting to earn more money than the others. The game can be played almost indefinitely, but the championship games have a time limit, the winner being the player with the most money at the end of that time. Controversy over Monopoly strategy continued at the tourney with proponents of Boardwalk and Park Place opposing those who say lesser properties bring in a better return for investment. Where necessary interpreters were available for contestants not accustomed to American boards. In other countries Monopoly boards are localized, with the British version having Mayfair and the French using the Champs Elysees instead of the Atlantic City, N.J., sites on American boards. Both American contestants were eliminated in semifinal competition. They were Alvin Aldridge, 24, a student from Dayton, Ohio, and reigning world title holder, and Gus Gostomelski, 39, an accountant from Skokie, 111., who won the U.S. title in Atlantic City, N.J. Careful trading and selective investment in terms of not overex-tending capital was rated as the basic strategy on the championship contests, with most players competing in the classic style of building capital slowly. Other players eliminated in semifinal play Sunday were Gianni Sirignano of Italy, Mrs. Monika Kussel of Austria, Norbert Barc-zewski of West Germany, Paul Agopian of Switzerland, Pierre Milet of France, Geert Slegten-horft of the Netherlands, Mrs. Carmen Borras of Spain, Miss Kristin Halldorsdottir of Iceland and Susan Touchbourne of Canada. 100 Sohd-State Modular Chassis tor dependable and economical perfor mance Uses less electricity than con ventional lube sets. Finely designed Mediterranean styling to enhance your home Model 4867. Super Bright Matrix Picture Tube tor a bright, sharp picture Extra tested tor extra reliability at the Magnavox OK Corral. Phone 355-3406 Star System channel pushbuttons on a hand-held transmitter . . or at the set. Selected tuning at random. Just press the channel number you want and it s there instantly, electronically . . with computer accuracy. No searching no tine tuning It s the most advanced color TV system today! A two-way speaker system with an 8 x 4 ova) Wooter and a 3'. Tweeter provides great sound realism. Videomatic Electronic Eye watches for changes in room light and automatically adjusts the picture so it's never washed out in a bright room, never glares in a dark room. 1.. . . 1 . .. .. .jaxii nun n n mwntiilnirli iiiiiittiihiiiitmiiiiiVtriiMimimtiwiiirimiiiiiim JEWELERS m '.am MAKE THIS A SPECIAL CHRISTMAS WITH OUR. 3 CHRISTMAS SPECIALS CARAT 0F DIAMONDS 'jr-ttt :'v.? F Total Wfiioht $199.. Illustrations enlarged All settings in 14K gold Illustrations enlarged 7 DIAMOND BRIDAL SET 'A - r JY I DIAMOND TRIO SET IN 14K GOLD Reg. $129. Yz CARAT Total Weight Reg. $399. 32& Vi CARAT T.W. Fashion Ring DIAMOND SOLITAIRE VALUES 14 CARAT reg $149 $II9. I2 CARAT reg $399 $299. 34 CARAT reg $599 $469. I CARAT reg $1,199 $899. Illustration Enlarged. 7 DIAMOND TRIO SET IN 14K GOLD Reg. $249. I89. 0 . . j '" ST"" 9 DIAMONDS Reg. $489. Reg- SQuu TUUU. A . - CARATIW. . DIAMOND cr- -fr DUO Re9$599- JST - , -r 1 rtiamnnrl earn mm. I ' v ' . .. cm fit . ---3saLy7 f-j 5 diamonds Reg. $54.50 ea. O. ' Reg.$129. $99 49ea. tw Tota. weigh, iTtyi'Mi.iMi.j,;i.uitiiiiiiiiiMiMiii.wi ,nwwwm'iiiww-iiiL iinui.iw.1 wwmmmfaw1w'iW'Vl mTr "H '111111111 ii ill t - - ---f-fy jmmm2p """'i-- in ii1iiiiiiiiiiiiniii i mi ii Hi ii ii iV in hi 1 1 in 1 1m 'liriii i'i i'im n hi mil ii in mm ii i n ihhhmii hi i" -ww. mm' mniKiliii i u. iiii.ihwiuwhii mmwii" hiiwi. mn im m m d.i w Mmm ' ... i ' WJtuiB ju iiiaiijijwiiwi,iiiiiuiiiiiiiB.Jit.t.iiiiiiMiiiiijijiiiiiiJiipij i iii.hih, .'"linii (---ln-iiriiiiiiifr'iTT'i'ii,iiimt-iJi1--'"h '----"- - M Ht- .,.r .. ..... .l... - . "-'-r-'-ffr-- -11-tr Trtur!! AT Setfngs ,n 10K gold tt SHOWS: 7, (i (O) lil ws w 'D," ,o,al wei9ht 1 i Xmm0 1qIP Ai&r nrim) n diamonds 1 Genuine Turquoise Smoky Topaz f Req AOIfl vi ,1 J Reg. $69.50 Reg. $89.95 . , "'j ff QUARTZ ' AlH 9 1 SCQ75 7 7 50 ? 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E$45. oy - "i hi iii, in mi m jiMwiijBii'iiwiiwaciiiwrjwprnr uiiiiii iinium iphhw luii'u'iiir i.ii . "-t in it r riiinii iit-tt' y ithhui .TJinji i i n " .' 'T" ,-r- i 1 . i m wl 0, -9 ff) IN JACKSON SHOP GOKDON'S rmmm l 121 E. CAPiTOL 31 Downtown V J V " T.-TJSi Also: VILLAGE FAIR, in Meridian JFIvlLCk3 22nd Avnue, South Lr-r-1 . v. -1 tr

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