Independent from Long Beach, California on January 24, 1975 · Page 13
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 13

Publication:
Location:
Long Beach, California
Issue Date:
Friday, January 24, 1975
Page:
Page 13
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tout Such, C*lli. Frl., J Needs support, funds eyeing run at ··· - · .. ·'* · ^-^ ' - · · in'76 JAGKSQN SEEKING POSITIVE BMAGE YORK CAP) ^ ,, j b,laek legisla- tgrsJulian Bond said -ftursday he will run for the presidency in 1976 if · h'e can get enough support -- and $200,000 -- by this June. : Kv'I expect to be a seri- o'us candidate for the presidency with his eye on that and nothing else," Bond said in an interview on ABC's "A.M. A m e r i c a " program, adding: . ·"Failing that, I hope to be able to have some say about who does get the nomination in the Democratic Party -what kind of person it is, what he or she stands for or against, what kind of program they have." The 35-year-old. Bond, who entered the Georgia House of Representa- Jives following a lawsuit and is now a state senator, said his candidacy, like that of Gov. George G. Wallace of Alabama, was a case of "no real expectation of winning the job but sending them JULIAN BOND 'Sending a Message' a message ... I'm coming from the opposite end of the political spectrum." Calling the profits of oil and sugar companies "criminal," Bond called for stronger government controls to solve the nation's e c o n o m i c problems. WASHINGTON (UPI),Sen. Henry M. Jacksqti plans to announce his formal candidacy for the," Democratic, .presidential nomination" early nejtt : month -- still searching for a way to counter what some advisers feel is a negative image on "human issues." The Washington senator, who unsuccessfully sought the party's 1972 nomination as a middle- of-the-road c a n d i d a t e , probably will announce in a brief nationwide broadcast Feb. 6 and then spell out his views on domestic and world problems in a series of speeches and interviews. Jackson, 62, would be the f o u r t h announced Democratic candidate. Already in the race are Rep. Morris K. Udall of Arizon a , a potential rallying point for party liberals; former Sen. Fred Harris of Oklahoma, who is conducting a populist campaign; and Georgia Gov. J i m m y Carter, ' w h o speaks for a new, less conservative South. Jackson will open his campaign with one great advantage: He probably has more financial backing than any other Democratic candidate now on the horizon^ But the senator's \,advisers still are undecided; on: how to translate this into popular.'; support.'', A . ; , : · ··;·'..-. The question was debat^ ed this week at a meeting at Jackson's headquarters in an unobstrusive renovated home near the Capitol. .Present were his chief political adviser, his press aide and a couple of but- side public relations experts. - · ' The senator was said to have left after about an hour or so, but the dialogue continued, with at least one participant making the point that Jackson's urgent need was to identify himself m o r e with "people problems." A source said Jackson's advisers were concerned that he may appear to the p u b l i c as a "two-issue man" --'referring to his unswerving support of Israel and a tough line toward the Soviet Union and his opposition to President Ford on the best way to solve the energycrisis. This source said Jackson was advised to find w a y s to dramatize his stand . t o w a r d "human issues" -- the problems of the elderly, children, the handicapped, the jobless ··and-"other victims of our contemporary society." ; "Actually, the senator's stand on such issues is .very--acceptable," the source said., "This is borne out by the fact that his voting record is rajed very high by liberal groups and relatively low by conservative groups. "The problem, as some of his advisers see it, is t h a t the public doesn't know it. People keep hearing about him in a "negative sense; he's op- posed to this or that, he's responsible ,for -a- breakdown in detente with the Soviet Union because . ; of his insistence on liber--* · alized Jewish emigration*-*' '·· FINAL DAYS! You are invited to discover exciting January Sale values in modern living room, dining room, family room and bedroom furniture,., floor lamps, table lamps, ceiling lights, accent area rugs, as well as beautiful decoratives and other items from our accessory shop. You'll .see world-famous modern designs that are shown in museum collections... as well as line for line copies... You'll see beautifully finished walnut, rosewood and other rare woods... lustrous white lacquers and laminates... rich, luxurious fabrics... deep, soft seating... exciting new ways to use color... marvelous lighting... and'more. IK eno! 2400 LONG BEACH BLVD. LONG BEACH (OFF SAN DIEGO FRWY. AT LONG BEACH 'BLVD. SOUTH) / 426-1341 / 636-8374 / FREE DELIVERY IN LOS AMGF.LES AND ORANGE COUNTIES / FREE STORE-SIDE PARKING. · OPEN SUNDAY 11 A.M.-5 P.M. / MONDAY FRIDAY 10:30-9 / OTHER DAYS 10:30-5:30 / CLOSED EVERY WEDNESDAY Effective January 25th 26th, 1975 SAVE 4.00 5 SHELF UTILITY UNIT Boys' Flared Jeans Women's Sweater Assortment Western styling. Choose from 100% cotton denim and poly cottons. Slims and regulars. Women's long sleeve turtle neck sweater 100% acrylic. A great assortment of colors. Machine wash. Special Buy Women's Logo T-shirt Save 4.99 Men's Long Sleeve Turtleneck Girls' Nylon Jacket 7.99 Res. 10.49 Reg. 7.98 . 100% Acrylic, great colors. S,M,L,XL. Hooded reversible nylon quilt. Easy core. 50% Polyester 50% Cotton S,M,L. 3 Shelf Mediterranean shelving/room divider HAVE A COFFEE BREAK JCPenney 123 «6 7 8 9 £ 3 .'.r.t'SN l .\\ f P CHARGE IT wiinyOuf JCPonncy Charge Card II you don'i have a charge. Jubi bv* ? i u n v KIM vvi; Ctin Open up your new account Enjoy creamy delicious cherry cheese cake and coffee Cafeteria. LAKEWOOD Carton at Paramount Open Dally, 9i30 to 9ilOj Sunday, 10 to 6 TORRANCE Sepurvedq and Hawthorne Op«n Dolly, 9iJO to *iJO; Sunday, 10 to 6

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