The Daily Free Press from Carbondale, Illinois on April 5, 1920 · Page 4
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The Daily Free Press from Carbondale, Illinois · Page 4

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Carbondale, Illinois
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Monday, April 5, 1920
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THE DAILY FREE PRESS * : ^ 'Newis. »r,: Jn.,.Cb,ica.gQ. j.. business vis.- Miss ?e.u-iah 'Roscoe was a St. ' Louis v '. s 'tor.!tpday. .'•".' ^IVfiss- ^>orothy- .Fryar visited ret- Chas. ,W.' : Hays J 'of' Mari'pn:' iicM«» : -f-Skii<l-"fritfids in-'Carte'rYine-. i- here today pif 'business/ ''' ~4 :'• . WOOD HERE TUESDAY en.- Leonard Republican business " visitor in St: "Loins today.' • : '''"""' ! • • • • • candidate ., for -the nomination . Jor 'president, will .he inVCarhbndale for .10. minute's Tuesday evening at ..5:25. .I^'is expe.cte'd the, General .will have something. .to say from tnc platform pt .the 'car. Gen. Wood. ..will be or< : his- way south. He is 'touring the country' in interest of his candidacy for .the nomination, for President. ' Carbondalf , .is the only town in the,. county, in. %vhich General Wood will "stop. . . iiStir'iS.''> i .-Edhh. ;: ''Coo'K 1 ''was .the g ^S^BejRiiSundajt-: 'of •: relatives • in Mrs. George. P'atterson and babj. of' Mafcandi visited .relatives . herp ' ' ' ; .:. Ea r'n'es •'- vi er,t - to • He r- Attend .aiv initjatioB sppnt the -"' ' " ' ' here. •Wi.mlr-ed'-pabst ' of ''Gentralfi ' •il.:*-.. ' l'. &;'§;• Robert's" of Harrisburp, Ark. lt:. ij:e"'cre»m 'in' aHiftaYpr? ''a « ''' . ; ..-.j.oe;'-I)niry ,"oT ST.'.touis was tha- Wifrk-end at her'- homi jind''-' tada v ; e's J'n'"'Ca-ft'er- . uiilce .- : Hicks : _pr^;IfHslj'r3ro wa's.the. v guest ! 'oVer y .SufidaV,'',o'{. Mis: '- '" : ' "To Hell With The Kaiser" Picture To Be Sho\vn "By Legion "T-p ''Hell With The 'Kaiser' 1 ''and the 'hog of U. Boat 5, two great war mention : pictures of war themes will' be,-, shown .under the auspices of r the~~Amefican Legioii' for tho benefit; ...of. .the local post the .Earth Theatre, .jjiext . Sunday .afternoon .and.evening' . '. . ' .' The. • entertainment- committee reveiwed .the ..•' pictures yesterday, Of All Sounds in fiafure, Few Thrill Like Bark of i Squirrel, 'Naturalist Says "J^a one pushes through the fringe of undergrowth which skirts the forest and 'seats himself, at daybreak, on ft stump-or a fallen tree to watch and listen,'the woods become Instinct with life!" 'say's' Arthur F. Bice in Boys' Life: -"Trie blue .lay sounds his trum- pet'call, the crows hold noisy consultation over 'their plans for- the day and ft "ruffled grouse whips the twigs of the pine With her wing as she leave? her roost. The chipmunks scurry about from stump.to stamp, now rusty- Ing precipitately to cover, now coming forth again'to-take'a critical view of the intruder. Their larger cousins, the red squirrels', come put from the hemlock's and, perching on a dead branch,.,rattle out a challenge to all comers. ' At .last comes the sound for which you have been waiting and which "makes the heart beat faster. •It is a thrashing among the boughs of the hpllow maple nearby, telling you that the*'gray squirrel is out after his breakfast. • ' .' "Away he goes .toward some big oak or hickory; scattering a shower of dew from the '-leaves as he. jumps from limb 'to• limb, revealing his course by-..the .springing- branches 'he : leaves behin'd •fihn.' -If his suspicions- are Soothing" Cigar Has Been Overtaken and Passed by Popular Little Cigarette Cigar types of tobacco are«pr6dtlced in New England;'New York,'Pennsylvania, the, Miami valley. In Ohio, Wisconsin, Georgia and Florida. Of the entire tobacco crop of 1,389.000.000 pounds In 1919, ^lie- cigar 1 tyfles constituted about one-sixth, and 'the chew- Ing, smoking, snuff and export types most of the remainder, according to -the bureau of crop estimate's, United States department of agriculture.. The cigar types are heavy producers per acre; the average for 1919 being "1,265 pounds, .while the. other, types had an nvprnge of 079- pounds'. Before 19,19, the average farm price of the cigar types of tobacco was always above'that of the''other types, as a whole, bnt In that year the extraordinary demand for tobacco other Hum'the -cigar classes.-and the Immensely .Increased' use of tobacco for cigarettes- raised the average farm price of the 'composite chewing, sniok; ing, snuff and export types to 41 .H cent's on December 1, or greatly above the price of 21.9 cents for cigar tobacco. Indeed, the latter class of to. bacco had a lower price than in either 1918-or 1917, not because of Increase of pro.ductlon, but-because of weaker e i demand.. The-cigar has been overtak- aroused:by anything he sees or hears; j en an ti passed by. the cigarette. he stops, ' on a limb- himself against a tree trunk and barks disapprovingly, accenting- eacK syllable with a jerk of his broad tail. Of all the sounds in .nature; ithere are few which thrill me squirrel." ink^'''' Eiwin^''_Rninen'aft': ' arid Louie 'Benne'tt. of Centralia jHarmliurg.^-is '/trie'^gues^'". : of her Advertisinfj will be done, lookin? 'tb. -"a•: large ... attendance on a hip-!-' scale this .week. It is expected .that a ./large audience will see -.the/, pic.- turesj- being on - Sunday.,••afternoon , Circle •.. Meets .-Tuesday We will Bive-.-ijo n\(«-e. cre'di't afer ' ' ' ' Apri • S^J.^Prmce' Cl.e'an£rs.. ', .' Miss "Arny .'igod^ird. -returned"" to, | her. home. ^in. .Anna, 1 Saturday after a, few. .(iay.s'.:.visi.t i ',,'witli her . .cot^siri, ''" . ll^riSjo'Miss;LoisEarley, ( tiuri iiiJ^TlW''if*^'cK'eVs''. insVitiite. .' ; ie'j cream. • ; ".;;'*fr-*i ^^ri^n^^f^^Ev'jrji^se^^ent- .to {$jjp?y ^Mind^y ' for. a'. f ev£' $ ays.' yt? -. ' f v*.-^ l-jfV-, • (I/--;. 1 .. .:i.i'J.':;J-, . , J &t.•-,ft;*Tr,:j.a.cob.s;.- j -.org;ani i St .at. the- i M George .\Kueler. ••'retur.ned .to! '-' ; UjtfrsJ.'Jiltner. 'Sponsler; and -lb(r.,..an jSnti'stfeH-i-City^iioday.oiu account . of RECOVERY CuratiT* of Lydia E. Pink- tiaMnV Vegetable Compound. -Cftiteilelphis, Fk.--'fl«ant toletfcw '.what good Lydia E. ~1 Ve ge tabl e Compound hf3 done me. I had organic trouble^ -oiid ihr going j through'" ''"'•- "-* j of Life. Iwith a, pain i | side and a bad Miss Fro"r:e'n,q.e,.3j;ri' <i.f 'East, St'. Loui? was' ' tlijy 'gnest ' over ; "&ii'nday '' George A. p?..,,her : . Campbell 'and,;'Jami|y. .,-„•'. ,. - — ic£i — . *'• • . '•. Mrs. J.' ^^.^'.arne.ck.e 'Jf 6'rmer jy.' Jpf tliis ciiy',biit.'ju>% of CentrAlii, .was hfre Ssy.i|-day, r e)rxmpte to Alton 'to ' " '' -The .•-ilirtpr.ovement Circle - o.l Gh-ristiari church••-will, meet -at the' the- home >f: Dr.; ; Delia Caldwellr Tue>| :^aft'efnoon. -at- -.2:30.- Everybody c,ordially,;:'in.vited' r The invteting --at^ thq new home OP Dr. :.-:—Each-, member br-'-ipp a friend. Siibw Cioaks lEarth •.•'<-••• . ' • .' • 7 Months In Canada, 36x-£ocal people Write ''•"iriiis' Kis "been a 1 " long- col<l. winter, have-:-not seen the ground for niaicly . seven months, because---the BACKrYARD PULLETS MAKE GOOD REICORD Java * -v Established With Hope of • -.^'Keeping Language Alive In fne hope of presei-ving n knowledge of the" 1 Chinese language, literature and '.tlie Confucian ethics, Hue! Kuan schools were established in every large town in Java as a bait to the youth of .tlie land. ''.Tlie schools are "thoroughly "modernized and a youngster-can study English and other European langilages, : geography, his- torysand^a: score ot other things nm- der competent. Instructors, so long as Chl'h'ese Is studied at the same time. As further -inducement • to attendance,-, albiClUnese Instruction' is carried: on-in the mandarin? or official, .Chinese.-language,' ao that any student j th& two-month period. In all probhhll- ,who returns to China-will be prepared i it :y they would'have'made'a-record of to- talk -to.the educated of all pi-ov- j ir>0 e"g.srs in' December-but'for the.cold Inces and...\rlH. not be confined to I xv hve during' the Matter part of the petty boundaries of any of the numer- j month. .'••-'.''-.• '. -' •- : ous-Southern dialects. Chinese, how-| Crediting the-birds-wlth eggs -at tlie ever, gets little attention from- the j market price of 90 cents a dozen (they- Chickens : which -lay' so : . 'protlflcnlly that tlieypay In a short time for their original 'cost.. and their feed are the kind of \Vhicii .all. suburbanites dream. S.- B. Hoi-ton of Washington, D. C., has -them in his back -yard. On Msiy-1, 1919, 'Mr. Hbrton bought 75 two-day-oTd: White Leghorn chicks. The. baby •chicks were brooded; jjvltl jars filled. with hot water .until they were old enough'to be'put : -in an outside coop. Later a six -by- eight-foot house was built for them, with an outside yard only fnur f eet -square. - ,_ Seven 1 of these "were '-pullets which began laying on 1 October 22, T when they NOTICE SERVICEMEN •Regular meeting of the American Legion Post at Elks Club Monday nig-lft, April 5th.'.AH ex-service men should attend. Very impo.itant business to transact. -Meefihg will close with lunch and" smoker. a3-2t' T, B. F. SMITH, Com.' i f | Out of my siffht ! You're guilty'as jHclil That's what Charley' Steel I told the man lie had just cleared • from what looked liked certain conviction for murder. One of the j many • big scenes in The. Right of :Way. Barth Theatre, April 5 and 6, AS— CHfCliESTER S PILLS **,K-.. ^THE»IAM<«Nl>BttAKl>. Jk ere less thnu six months old. -Their Inyin'g record for November, wns ll"i eggs, and for December 137 eggs, a total of 252 eggs for the two months. or' an average' of 30 eggs- a pullet for students;-.who seem to regard .the study, oft It as useless 'drudgery, and who clgcote their whole time and interests to the subjects which wlll.be of. mosfassistance to them In the commercial world. All local business in we're 1 SI. part of the time) for the. period, they, lutd Tnlil for their original, cnsi'.nnjl all feed by December 15. In figuring th'c total cos±-of the project, the "cost of 'the seven other 'chicks raised, which were cockerels,-was .fig- Is .conducted in Malay, and all I nred, arid-allowance WHS made for their foreign business In English. Seoresrof patriotic youngsters who graduate from Huel Kuan schools go [.'-an'- average- of 42 inches,f to China yearly, upon their gradim- .S^meJidriftS: are- 15 .-feet-deep,:.near! *' •''•—*- •• »—•>•« *•"-our ^iouse;;-Ha-y.e--.ha-d a; temp?i-atur<s 'nece. of.'.Mr :a attcrfnc.l Jt : Ke-,teac"b«r9 i meeting fierit ; She. Viil " p-jfA'52 .-beJctw-. several :times. -Snowed -been.'- : a hard ?nn"tcr-'6'n-"s'tjp.ck' ,a -great" many cat-l tie" have 'rfr-ozen. -.-.- . • .' , . -. . : .,'Rayrh'pnd, '\Vinchester is convalescing -from - a...sev.cre:...ca.Te. J-pl,.-innur; ...... . 'i'\irs"'j;.-''y. >Geht; , Bob' Gent and his'-' wife'/ '-Ghailes --'Reridleman and Ris wite-'als'b.-all- of Harrison Craw- market value when slaughtered^.From' now'on the upkeep-of this flock will be sniall. romp'a'red ; wlth the revenue. .The'pullets, were fed scratch feed tlon, andi enter -military colleges there, i morning ari'd night, with. a. dry mash- eventually nnding their ..way Into the ! made • of .'"equal. 1 .parts'/ of.- middlings, Chinese army. - .--.- : bran, comment',, .and meat scrap,, bei foie them-all the'time.- This ration is ' one.used and .advocated .by .the United States -'department of- .agriculture. : Nearly . every' day "they '-were given a Re«sidpht«5 DlJrinn lop AnP i "ttle green'-sfuft, sucli- as cabbage or nesmenis uuring ice Age j snroutfed - O ats,ssweii as tame scraps and' grit'and. oyster shell. ••' - ;1 ; • Eyide.nce Indicates Indian • •':' Late'Comer, Compared With "Several 'scientific Investigators a'gre^i that the Indjan as we know him; is .attj ..-• ,. a ^ t , |._ IQI o i coniparatrvely late comer. Whether he I v u ,v«Hl) naie IOr la la. \ «>._i'.'_j -u'. n . nn _* *i^«i_«' jr_«^^, •' .* f,s A •!! '- " • LI!**!*!A**4- \v\ Ul!f>tr\r«v; arrived by way of Alaska from -Asia; 1 . - - -. . Shaw's '•itU-lvave' beenl.down • sick- may never be discovered, but the relics ..•:;.,.*.. •••,•• .'• '.: .• .' ... •• of his civilization' .are believed to date ; :[ Man yr farmers have no .hay .nor^ back not more thaa a few thOHSi , nd straw .and. ;ca-u,'t. j>uy any as l-i's: nbrle' 'to- b.iiy.-' ; -. .there . the. 'Normal.,.-!. ' Prof, and M of Vie'riha' . meeting"- here.- last .;w.*ek.'.:P.rqf. .Me,: Cartney- ts- : ' pn"ricipil-\'of the -Vienna Township • HigfiV Se'fibbl. EASTER CANTATA Mrs. . Ireii-e ' Hods.e ..teacher ,m the; Baptist b'rphan.4ir«" at : Carriii, ' at-; t ' ! 'Teach'ts r ' Institute la^t; . tended tft«' ! 'Teach'fts ' '' -.53 !'M ia» one going througii-th« Change BTi«.tjyTtt,:.for it cured ,ine aftirTl inn W ui nopes of getting better. Siii' publish this and. I will' tell i!iii_.*i±i:i. *.•.;*-i_'__• x" : ^i: - .j.i_'«••• : >•.•*«. week. ' Mrs. irlpdge's brc>:th.er, / 'Dr. Milton i Board-, of- Louisville, ' Ky.,; speiit Saturday Her? witB her. -'.'^ The J. R- Johnson family, who iiavfc. be.=n. with/ -.Mrs.'.; Johnson's parents,' Mr. 'a"* 1 Mrs.'W; L'.- Hearn, Since' 1 their' b'ome 'was'-barricd, have taken rooms in'W'e ,?9.rger ; b.ui-ldinB ov-et the. Clements', .-and Etherton ,"THe Easter • King," .an impressive 'cantata,- .was : successfully rendered • at.-, the- Methodist^ church yesterday a.fternpon... under ..the capable .direction. of Mrs. Louis J. Mrs. Ralph.- Thompson panist.' • j. '.'. ' .'...' Despite, the-" inclement weather, large audience, greeted formers. . The -church' was appropriately decorated -, in -flowers .-. for the . oc<;a- sion and .the ladies taking part were attired i",v?hjte. . - Xh'e. qrchesUa, with' -V'ernon Patterson and Kenn.pn Renfro, first violins;. Errielie Kerstine and Alice store. Misses "-Mildre'd •• '- aiid ; ._->. Dorothy Deisoiv'-w.h'o - are"' ;teach'iBp.; -IB -the •SesVer ' sthoolsV Attended 'the 'meeting "of ""ttjV .'teachers'-; As-s:6ciation, and- were • the .^i«(S<s of ..their-, uncle and- aunv'Mr.' and;.Slr.s: : L.: W- Miller,' during their-'.stay;. here. .-•. 'Walter -Merr'ynlii'ii -'.has'- been:. visit'-. ;„•»..' i^;'- Vii^i't.' 1 'Miis-"-XCary jBuch'a'n- Hills with as accom- the per- years at most, observes* a writer, in Boys' Life/ There is much evidence on the other, hand to indicate that men lived In North America at the close of 'the Ice age and perhaps during the glacial period. Tlie evidence Is found for the most part in the Ohio and Delaware valleys. The rude instruments 'these men used in their hunting find homes have been found buried deep In gravel which is believed to date back to the close of the ice. age. -If this be the case men lived in America 10,000 or 15,000 years ago.. Some geologists believe that the gravel •• deposits are considerably older. How these men found their way to America- in remote antiquity, how much of'tlie land they occupied and where- they disappeared are perhaps the most fascinating problems in American;- archaeology. The patient Investigations of -many' • trained, scientists are carrying us-every day nearer the answer. • • • ing- his ijan. • l{r.';,M : .^ r; y l J 1 - an x. is 3 ffraduute . ...., w-ith -tlie U.'• S.; Coast '. aud Geodetic; Survey w ith'• Kea.dquirtetS;:atSWash- in^ton, -;yP. ; r;Ci \?\ Alter :•' 'r.eiutnmg.:.-to ''' ' W.eav.cr, . second ..violins ; and Billie A'twill; trombone, _ accomijanied; selections' with,-the chorus ofytwen- .ty>':vpices ....... - - •..•Mrs. .Lester Hqyton, Mrs.- Ralph riami'lton,,' "Mrs. -"Ira . Dill, Mrs. Clau ; de. Leg-g. Mrs. Heber : 'Crowell, ^Miss ': Luctle. ; Clifford,. Frank Dubbs and . Oscar Day were Ihe soloists, 'their 'renditions being especially; 'commendable. . -. : ,'Interestinpf..musical numbers wjrr' 'given; by :the quartette composed/of Mesdames Heber .Crowell and "Les. T 'ter ..Hayton; Messrs. .Frank -Dubbs 'ind 6scar!Day.'. •' ' : :. ">"•''. The closing."feature of- the- pror prim.' wa-s ' "The ; - ,-Resurrectipn,!!.:. a 'pliy,' •. given ;-by.' five 'small children: Jeanette'. Evans, Elriora' Boosy' Billie Steel,'..Charles '.Feirich :.and' Luther Chipmunk Stores Plenty of Food for Winter Use The chipmunk is a provident little chap, arid : stores up a.prodigious quantity of food, sometimes a peck or more of nuts and grain; and when 'snugly hidden 'in his winding burrow, the mouth of which he closes when the cold season arrives, a hard winter has no.terrors 'for him. His enemies, the hawks, owls and weasels, may go hun- •gry;--but-safe'in'the bosom of mother etrfth> wffli the wnrin mantle of th-e shpw7ab$ve" him, the chipmunk passes a.'cosyjj.wiiiter, in the midst of'com- fori and plenty, • dreaming of the time \yhen the south wind shall blow again anil'the squfrrel cups shall open once Highest in History of. :the Country, Statistics Show The.death rate of IS foi- each' 1,000 of population in "the death 1 registration I are* of.30 states and 27 cities, with a I total estimated population- of 81.868,- j 104 for 1918 was-the highest on rec- ! ord. according to the census bureau's I annual mortality statistics, vrhich j show 3,471,387 deaths for the year. Of the total deaths, 477,407,'or more than 32 per cent,: were' due to influenza and pneumonia, 380,990 having' occurred in thft Inst four months of the year when nn . epidemic .of these diseases prevailed. The rate for inntien- z*a and pneumonia was 5SB.2 for ehch 100,000.- -Influcnzn-... caused 244,681 deaths and pneumonia 232.786. showing rates' of 2S3.9 and 284.3 for encb 100,000, respectively, the highest rates which ever have appeared for- these causes. The rate in 1917 for influenza wns 17.2 »nd for pneumonia 149.8. 1 The other principal causes of deaths were organic diseases of the heart, .tuberculosis, acute -nephritis, .Brightls disease and cancer, which together were responsible for 391,381 deaths, or nearly 27 pel* cent of the total during the year. ' . ' _ ^ort.-.Boys; Life. Bakes and Boils. A gas oven with which food csn be .j. Riicti.boiled at .the same time Xf JD yearsknownasBest^SiLfeiCAhvaysRVl'iabie rrr. SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERVWHEK ACMB QLAL1T\ VARNO-LAC More, shabby, surface, w.orn furniture is discarded each year than is destroyed^ by -fire. ' - ' . .• ; '".-'':€ f 3IBEW0i You insure your lurnitiire against fire. ' Is ,it insured agairisl wear? A rjtfod piece of furniture will last a lifetime if its' surface is properly protected. ••'-'. * Once a •desk,': : c.!ia'ir'- or table loses its newness— begins to look shabby — it travels a fast road- to 1 the junk heap. Renew its: surface with Acme Quality Varno-Lac and you" renew.- its life. You've saved the 'price .of a desk, chair or table, "and enhanced, the appearance. of your home. By saving 'the surface you s«ve all. '•••_• Acnie Quality. Varno-Lac' -stains "and-""varnishes at -one operation 'producing handsome imitations, of ; expensive hardwci'ods.'Godd for floors, furniture and woodwork. . . .! ...... ' •• Being; in the business, we can probai}^' give you sonie help- fui hints about painting. . ' * A P • S. - CARBONDALF, ! Ji.. Is a Californlan's invention. Natives Employ Curious Methods to Heal Wounds Inhabitants of the little mountain country of SIputenegro employ curious methods of medical treatment, according-to American: physicians who-" did relief.work there. The first thought of of the natives in healing ;\younds is to apply, chewing tobacco, -horsehair, or fresh rabbit skin.to a sore; with .the hair facing inside. Common ink is considered to be a sovereign remedy for burns. Cobwebs are used in Montene- •jro to stop bleeding sores or wounds. When a person 1 is bitten by. a do;:, thr favorite remedy is to pull off the .animal's ear and rub the.wound with it. 'Since the arrival of American physicians, however; tlie''natives' are 1 making numerous visits, to Bed-Cross cliii- ics and -dispensaries as .a. 'means of ».:._• i cjiring-their ills. WRSGLEYS, mSPEARMINT ™* PERFECT, I SEALED TIGHT- KEPT

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