Tucson Daily Citizen from Tucson, Arizona on November 3, 1950 · Page 6
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Tucson Daily Citizen from Tucson, Arizona · Page 6

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Tucson, Arizona
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Friday, November 3, 1950
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Page 6
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--Photos by Pat-McGowan ROUNDING UP the cattle "from the pen* to the sales barn is a big job at the new Casa Grande Livestock Co., Arizona's largest livestock auction. Pete Gilham, one of the three partners, is in charge of this operation, and can be seen behind the cattle, running them through the maze of runwa}* to the lug auction barn in the background. Desert Turns /nto Fire Des f°7 s A g1 T i ,. S o o n e r M i l l Another industry -Arizona's largest cattle auction, now'stands'one:'mile west of Casa Grande, where two'months ago'there-was nothing but desert waste. Today, 117 acres..of feed and sales pens, and the auction barn of the new ; Casa Grande Livestock Co. stretch as far as you can see and represent S5SB! AUCTIONING cattle involves a fast tongue and a spirited sales talk. In the interior of tie new Casa- Grande barn, partner Lloyd Fletcher, sits astride j the horse in the background, Auctioneer Yernon Gottenjen. and two clerks, are in the center stage. Cattle come in the left side, mill in the center during the actual sale which lasts only a few moments, leave by the right gale, are weighed, and moved into pens preparatory to ·hipping. jfn;. - ~ *-'l Tucson Visitors Club CATTLE RACE;through the stalls leading into the unction room. Yardmen .have -a·systematic method of. routing thejBtocfc from the pens to the salesroom and back to the pens without wasting a moment. , Korean Power Dam In Doubt First Party Tonight First party of the 1930 winter season will be" held by the Tucson Visitors' club this evening in the Chamber of Commerce building. Everyone visiting In Tucson,! whether for one night or for the| entire season, is invited -to attend,! Mrs. Thelma McQuade, hostess,! said. Bridge, canasta and other games will be played, beginning at 8 p. m. - · Mrs. Mixton, 32, .Dies} ·, Services Are Pending Mrs. Consuela Salas Mixton, 3546 S. -Clark ave., died .yesterday. In* a ilocal hospital. She was 32 years' old ana lived here since she was infant-. Survivors are her husband, Re- ugio; three-sons, Tony, Eddie and illy; Atld'a daughter, Mary Lou.. Arrangements will be announced y 'the' Parker-Kerr mortuary.. an investment of §250,000. At the first sale lasi Thursday October 26, 1500 head of cattle were auctioned for .$165,000, keeping two auctioneers busy from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Over 35 buyers from California, -Nevada and Phoenix, and 20 ranchers took part in the largest sale ever held in Arizona. Yesterday, approximately -800 head went under the auctioneer's gavel. The sale is expected to settle down to about 1,000 head, at the weekly Thursday sale. On the large scale operation, 100 head of cattle are often sold within five'minut'es. Bob Locke and Pete Gilham. Tucson ranchers and ranch realtors, and Lloyd Fletcher, are the men behind southern Arizona's newest stock enterprise. Just two months ago," they realized the need, for such an auction and began work. A large quonset hut has been converted -into, a combination sales barn, modern office and restaurant. Locke takes charge of the office , heading .a staff of eight.; Feature of the office work is the automatic weigher, and paying of sellers, and collecting from buyers mmediately following,, each sale. Out in the immense yards, Pete Gilham, astride his yellow palo- nine, lines -up pens o£ stock, in the order in which they are to be sold. He and his two cohorts have a difficult job finding the proper pen and routing the cattle I through the complicated alleyways I to the barn. But they keep them | coming, in proper order, and onej | right after another. . | In the sales ring, Lloyd Fletcher, the third partner,- ushers in the cattle from the pens. He usually tells the price expected before Auctioneer Ternoh Cbttehjen "gets underway with, his rapid-fire auctioneer's lingo. Over 35 men are kent busy handling the stock dur ing the sale. After the cattle-are sold, by the feeding pens for-6,000-cattle, .and now feeding about 3SOO. . The auction has all the color and sociability of a ranch, barbecue. FREDERICK, Okla., Nov. 3. (JPI-- Fire swept through the huge Cas-i Sidy wheat, mill here early today but was ^controlled, shortly before daybreak"' to ,end a threat to this southwestern Oklahoma town's .industrial district. Wheat stored in the five story sheet metal and . ·wood structure continued to burn at 8 a.m. but It posed no further danger. The blaze was-discovered at 1:20 a.m. and leveled the building in storage and office building, and at 2:30 a.m. they were half destroyed Flying sparks ignited^the Chick asha cotton oil mill '.plant two blocks south: of the Burning struc ture; 'buf the- flames we're, put ..out without too much damage, officials said.. ' Also threatened for a time were an automobile/ company and 'the tarroers co-op,, gin. .; · ·-. ': An eerie glow lighted the sky _ , . ,. . - d * J J J a J i i ~ i Jc v t;±cu L J J c tj Him i UK. Ill Ranchers wives flock to the week-] short order , A £orce of 10 firs ° en ; ly event Over congenial-cups ofjaided by volunteers, 'was. unable to week's make 'any headway, against the names, whipped by a strong wind. coffee, the accumulated talking takes place. Gilhara, Locke and Fletcher are highly optimistic over their new project. They studied the big auctions in AmariSlo, Texas, and Clovis N. M., before beginning work on their pens and barns six weeks ago. And judging from the .enthusiasm of attending ranchers and buyers it is one of the most important strides, in.-cattle buyinp and selling ever to come to south ern Arizona. The fire spread hurriedly- to a new Fr.ld«y~Evtnlno, Nov.'l, 1 over tMs town of 5,500, trie center of wheat and alfalfa farming in tii state. ' Overheard in Buffalo, New York PETRI WINE CO., SAN FRANCISCO. Evening School Adds Aviation Engine .Class Now included in the Tucson nigh adult evening school schedule .is a course on aviation engine theory,. Principal Rolliri TV Gridley announced today. Milton Mallis, faculty member, will instruct the class, which will begin Nov. 14. Some practical work Will also be included in this. 144- hour course. The fee is $15 a term. pound, they are. weighed and sent Adjacent other pens for sales shipment pens are MORE JOBS for MORE PEOPIE VOTE 308 YESQ Arizona Workman's Compensation CommfffM -P. O. Box 3961, Phoenix-A, J. From, T*mp«r Go. Plckvrlng, Yuma; Gto. Naflil, Jock Proctor, Tucson; Vtrnon Fojttr, Phoflnix. LEO J. FINCH --IS CONSIDERED BE .TAX ASSESSING EXPERTS TO HA.VE '* THE BEST ASSESSED COUNTY IN OLB STATE. ' --IS CONTINUALLY STRIVING TO EQUALIZE VALUATIONS SO EACH -TAXPAYER PAVS NO MORE THAN HIS JUST SHARE OF TAXES. ·--WAS INSTRUMENTAL.IN GETTING THEASSESSORS TOGETHER ON EQUALIZATION BETWEEN COUNTIES AND COMPILED THE APPRAISING MANUAL 'WHICH WILL BEi USED THROUGHOUT THE STATE ; --INITIATED THE MOVEMENT TO EQUALIZE MERCHANTS' INVENTORY TAX. ' S --IS WELL QUALIFIED BY EXPERIENCE TO HANDLE;THE DETAILED WORK OF THE MOTOR VEHICLE DIVISION WHICH IS AN MPORTANT PHASES OF THE ASSESSOR'S DUTIES. } '· --HAS HAD TWENTY YEARS' , EXPERIENCE IN THIS 7 OFFICE, SIXTEEN AS CHIEF DEPUTY UNDER C. M. TAYLOR' AND FOUR AS ASSESSOR. / ' , -, --HAS MAINTAINED AN EFFICIENT P E R S O N N E t THROUGHOUT HIS TERMS IN OFFICE AND HAS INSISTED ON THEIR COURTEOUS CONSIDERATION OF ALL. --THROUGH HIS ABILITY, INTEGRITY, HONESTY AND FAIRNESS DURING Hfe YEARS IN OFFICE HAS ACHIEVED 1 A RECORD WHICH IS BEYOND REPROACH. RE-ELECT LEO J. FINCH DEMOCRAT COUNTY ASSESSOR A member of: ^ ' it. National Association of Assessing''Officers 2. Member of Lands Committee of N.A.A.O. 3 . Real Estate Board .of .Tucson . . . , . - ' 4. Tax study; committee ot Tucson Chamber .of Commerce. (This ad paid for by employees of the Assessor's Office). CAMPBELL AT 6RANT U. 5. No. I IDAHO BAKING EATING OR COOKING . · WASHINGTON, Nov. 3. (}--An army description of the Suiho power dam on the Korean-Manchurian border underlined today why Communist troops are defending it fiercely. A spokesman for the army told reporters at the Pentagon that this Japanese-built darn has a power capacity of 700','000 kilowatts. For comparison, this Is about two-thirds that of the Hoover -darn on .the Colorado river", Asked what the Intention of United Nations 'forces is concern. Ing the huge Suiho power project, In casa-U. N, troops reach the Korean side of it, the' spokesman laid he does not know.. Neither would he ..discuss the ·trategic value of Suiho and-its allied questions. Neverthless, the Importance Is obvious. .If it remains entirely In Communist hands, its pov/er can be denied to the non-Communist part of Korea. On the .other hand, ·hould United Nations forces reach the Korean part of the power · project, and turn it over to the South Koreans, this would give non-Communists a hand in control of .the power flow both to Korea «hd Communist Manchuria. The Suiho system, set up tjy the Japanese when they controlled Korea, has a present total capacity estimated at around 935,OpD kilo- tvattE, of which about 450,000 is- how being used. This power has been going to both Korea and Manchuria. The system involves a total of seven dams now operation- ·1 or projected.-The largest is at 'Suiho, about 75 .miles from the tnouth of the Yalu river. The dam there is; 328 feet high and 2.7SS feet. long. It forms' a.' reservoir 40 miles long. Another,dam, the Mamochin, is entirely on the Manchurian side of the border. It has a power capacity of 235,000 kilowatts. ELDER W. G. MILLS, DISTRICT pastor of Arizona, will be guest speaker at Tucson Sharon'Seventh- Day Adventist.church at 7:30 p.m. today and 1 p.'m. tomorrow. ' A baptismal service will be held at I 2:30 p.m. tomorrow.'.The church! is located at the corner of South Fifth avenue and 21st street. I PIPPINS APPLES SWEET JUICY 5UNKI5T ORANGES ib. HOME BUILDERS ATTENTION! You Will Find a Complete Assortment of Plumbing--Electrical Harehvare Supplies To Fit Tour Needs and Pocketbook FRIDAY and SATURDAY SPECIAL! Chrome-Plated SWI\G SPOUTS Wall type, ledge type--Worth I S9.50 to $12,00. Open Sundays--8:30"to 1 P.M.. Southwestern Builders Supply Co. 1431 g. 6th Are. Ph. '2-2715 $7.50 YOUNG TENDER STRINGLESS GR. BEANS ib. BEEF CHUCK ROAST TAKE PUBLIC EMPLOYEES OUT OF POLITICS VOTE 106 YES Sponsored by Arizona Civil Service Committeb U. S. GOOD LEAN TENDER EASTERN L O C A L R E D I-LB, CELLO PEG. LB. PORK ROAST PEYTON'S SLICED BACON U. S. GOOD SWISS STEAK SWIFT'S PREMIUJI BONELESS VEAL ROAST LOIN END Lb.* LB. LB. LB. A N R E A D Y I'm voting Says MRS. P. M. BREEDING, civic I«d*r of Tucson and immediate Past-President of the State P.T. A. (Arizona Congress.of Parents and Teachers). "Amendment 102 means a lot to taxpayers--but even mere to boys and girls. J^ means a good school opportunity for every Arlzeno child." The Arizona Citizens Committee for Equalization of School Taxes NEW LOW PRICES COFFEE £)1CI1UCU V JlUtt-VJ CORBYS Straight Bourbon OLD CROW Blended Whiskey SCHENLEY Seagram's . .' UIH Ancient ,Bottle.;..5th' Italian Swiss Gold Medal SWEET WINES LARGE SIZE ..... SOAP for fifth MAXWELL HOUSE, FOLGER'S, CHASE SANBORN, HILLS BROS., M.J.B. OUR MOTHERS BIRDSEYE tOUISA-MYERS Chairman--Phoenix SAM J. HEAD Prescott H.CDOBSON Vice-Chair. -- Mesa MRS. GUS LOPEZ Tucson JAMES F.BYRNB Yuma S. SAUND£RS IPhoenix P. W. FICKETT Tucson E P. VICKERS Douglas BERT HAWKINS Winslow DIXW. PRICE Sec.-Treas.--Ph'r. 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