Independent from Long Beach, California on January 23, 1975 · Page 64
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 64

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Long Beach, California
Issue Date:
Thursday, January 23, 1975
Page:
Page 64
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U.S., Russian exchange ;··':·'· . · · · · ' · ,.,/ ; ;··-'/.·;.· ': '-. :; - : , v · ' ' . ;'/·:·".'·. ; ; , ' ' · · ' . .·: ~ opens students eyes By LYNN OLSON : MOSCOW .Iff) - For four months, Morris Rabinko, who is majoring in Rus- siap at the State University of New York, was able to combine book learning with a first-hand glimpse of the Russian people and their way of life. Sometimes, the 20-year- old admitted, that glimpse was unsettling for him and the nine other SUNY students who spent a semester at Moscow's prestigious I n s t i t u t e of Foreign Languages. Most are Russian majors. Ten students from the IFL traveled to SUNY's Albany c a m p u s in the f i r s t formal undergraduate exchange program between Soviet and American schools of higher education. Before they returned to New York this month, five of the Americans discussed their experiences, which they felt improved not only their Russian but also their understanding of the country and the people. "I had a totally differ- 'ent conception of the Soviet Union before I came," said Andrea Beesing, 21, a senior from East Aurora, N.Y. "I hadn't pictured w h a t i t ' s really like here." The Americans had only limited contact with their Russian counterparts. The U.S. students lived in a, Moscow hotel instead of institute dormitories and, attended classes especially designed for them, with no Soviet students in attendance. THE STUDENTS were, lodged in the hotel because of the desire of Soviet officials to insure they lived comfortably, saifl Dr. Edward Nordby, head of the Russian department at SUNY's Oswego State campus and adviser to the group. He added he looked forward to having SUNY students in dorms in the second exchange between the schools in the fall. ''In the beginning, we had ,a very difficult time meeting other students," recalled Annette Jarmak, a 22-year-old senior from Utica, N . Y . "But since then, we do have so many o t h e r friends we don't know what to do." The Americans admitted their lack of facility in the R u s s i a n language when they arrived limited c o n t a c t s . They had studied Russian an average of three years, but as one said, "When we came here, we realized how little we actually know." The students spent 22 hours a week in class, studying the Russian language, culture, literature, press and film. Their class load ^was seven hours more than the average load of a U.S; college student but 13 hours less than that of a Russian student. The class sessions were less relaxed than the students were used to back home, Miss Jarmark said, and the teachers "lectured at'' them instead of allowing participation. The professors were shocked by the casualness of the Americans,.particularly by such habits as yawning and stretching in the classroom, added Don de Palma, 20, a senior from Peekskill, N.Y. ; ' · THE AMERICAN said the Soviet students seenv ed much more serious and formal than they in school but t h a t the .formality ended outside class. The SUNY s t u d e n t s began to-visit the dorms almost every night, they said, and found that their a p p e a r a n c e u s u a l l y p r o m p t e d i m p r o m p t u ' parties. A guitar was produced or a Western rock cassette placed in a tape recorder, liquor appeared and the dancing started in the dorm room. "Music broke down a lot of barriers," Miss Jarmak said. "The only problem was 'that they like heavy hard rock music much more than we do," De Palma contributed. The w o m e n students said they spent more time with Russians than the eotwrev OPEN 6 DAYS 9 AM-7 PM/CLOSED SUNDAY 428-4388 4927 LONG BEACH BLVD. I BLOCK SOUTH OF DOOLEY'S FOOD STAMPS WELCOME COMPLETE FRESH MEAT COUNTER BEEF CHUCK 7-BONE ROAST BEEF CHUCK 0-BONE ROAST BEEF CHUCK STEAKS BEEF SHORT^. A RIBS 69° BEEF CHUCK CLOD ROAST OEFAMtlf] PUN 1 7-loni loosl 1 Club Stwki } Chuik Slioki 1 lound Sliolcs ) Ibi. Sporer!bi 10 Ibs. Ground B««l BUDGET PUN ! Ibi. Country Sauiog* 3 Ibi. l«l iHil 3 Ibi. LuiKh Miat i Ibi. lound !l»ol ] Ibi. Uon lawn J Ibi. Cup-Up vhiiii 1 Ibi. Wllnirl 3 Ibi. Mil llbl TOIU 51 III. 1 Ibi. Pork Chops 1 ibt. Chuck Slciki I ID! Fish FHKI ! Ibs. Stew ] Ibs Cnkken ] Ibs. Ground Mea . Ik. d*«( DAJI(t men. Miss Beesing and Miss Jarmak added that they occasionally went out with Russian men. "THE MEN here are more standoffish," said Miss Beesing. "They don't take you into their confidence. They treat women more as objects." "The women are very, very meek," added Miss Jarmak. "We had much better discussions with the mep." De Palma and Rabinko said they had problems establishing relationships with Russian women. "Girls are more high schoolish, more g i g g l y here t h a n at h o m e , " Rabinko said. "They're very reserved. And they c a n ' t w a i t to get married." Press-Tdttrtm, KftiHiiito, im.«, m IndtunoXiri), IttmtH, J«",n, im FIRST-HAND .LEARNING was the order for these students from the State University of New York at Albany, taking part in an exchange program with Russian students. On this snowy Moscow street are, from left: Andrea Beesing, East Aurora, N.Y.; Morris Rabinko, Bronx; Terry Ceravolo, Lockport; Don de Palma, Peekskill; and Annette Jarmak. -APWirsphoto HARDWARE LUMBER PLUMBING ELECTRICAL HOMiD HOME IMPROVEMENT CENTERS Eg Paneling Sale! ·*i ^:,fcm%2gLA±4^KW^^ PICKET FENCING ASSEMBLED 8 FT. SECTIONS · 4 (eet high, OUR sturdily constructed REG. of quality fir. 9.99 ' W SECTION SHATTERPROOF TUB ENCLOSURE · Aluminum frame, plastic glass doors · Easy glide rollers · Fits any standard 5' tub #RV50 OUR REG. 34.99 yM .^rtff-KI REDWOOD TRI-STAKES 5 FOOT FENCE BOARDS ·Makes a fence with an interesting pattern. While they last! 6 FT. TRI-STKES 29' I" 1 '} QUANTITIES LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND . . . NO KAINCHECKS! ^ E A . 1/4" x 4 FT, x 8 FT. SHOP PLYWOOD They last · Mill blemishes...at this price, who cores? · Hurry in and stock up. REG. 4.49 «fiCgS| · IXL^Wrv ' JLfr-~K: f s.'-X£..^.:l. ..2%!i-.-4*»»fc-ate 1 i 1 -«.;.-,J'l:4 ,.S*iJWlllklfiSy liijj 'MAsdNiTr'f^xljKi BRICK'' T PANEi$fi '* Realisick .^oli« ' 'iri-ypuf choice ol Ted . I SHEET Plant 'n Save...The Bareroot Route! Rose Bushes Build 'n Save is well-known for the . outstanding quality and grow-abil- - ity of our bare root stock. Plant now for a riot of rose blossoms this 2V. LB. BOX - "BEST" SNAIL PELLETS GRADE varieties. · California field-grown . . . each bush has 2 to 4 mature canes . :,. . -real .quality! ·'·'.· -,' SNAIL SLUG r · Rids your garden of I slugs -snails overnight! OUR REG. 89c BOX Limit 2 per customer. Expires Jan. 29, 1975 OUR RES. 1.98 ROOT.WRJPfED ' FRESHNESS! ' BREROOT iTREES Sulfateof I Ammonia 2 1 0 0 Bp,1Cm*lh AnJ rUh Green Ccbr \\'lf to 5/8':';TRUNKS; AMMONIA e Big 20 Ib. bag . . . for rapid growth green! OUR REG. 2.99 WOW! 1 · 20-L6. H BAG Limit 2 per customer Expires Jan. 29, 1975 SALE PRICES GOOD THRU JAK: », 174 LLLLJLL 30 WT. - HI-POWER MOTOR OIL Special MOTOR on- Change oil often! QTS. FOR limit 4 per customer. Expires Jan. 29.1975 FOOT-VINYL I-WEBBING 3 futniiu'e far pwrtei . . OUR REG. 29' 'ROLL Expires 6 per customer Jan. 29, 1975 "BIST" PLANT FOODS TOMATO VEGETABLE Same ingredients \/ \ used by commercial 9 "CITRUS AVOCADO * Promotes high quality fruit, with more ·Balanced blend of nitrogen, phosphate 4 1 potash. roi/f? CHOICE "Bandini" 3-WAY Weedilizer r$ OR:UDIES' S T Y L E ' l l · 24 Ib. bag covers 25000 sq. ft- · Feeds dichondra, controh f| weeds insects! OUR RE6.12.95 "Bandini" PLANTER _ MIX · Organif' blend of peal moss, redwood tompoit, minerals more. Greet bore- roof mulih! LOlDED WITH EXTRAS! MOTO-CROSS BIKES WHILE m OTmiutt mm mm OMKL mm _^ AN Anil W .1 . - · ( -. ~:TV*TT- i ' · · -i M l i l 7 V 4 4 1 l i ; i 4 i » M J l l l XHEN 7 RAYS a W»K HAIIY 0 A M . TO 9 P.M. SATURDAY 9 A.M. TO 8 P.M. SUNDAY 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

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