Independent from Long Beach, California on March 22, 1976 · Page 1
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 1

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Long Beach, California
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Monday, March 22, 1976
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'All of us in our hearts' Jurors wan te d to believe Patty innocent By LACEY FOSBURGII .N'cw York Times Service SAN FRANCISCO-Thc jurors in (lie trial of Patricia Hearst wanted "all in our hearts," as one said, to believe that she was innocent, but they fell obliged to vote for conviction because "the steady accumulation of evidence against her" and the quality of her defense left them no choice. They regarded the government's evidence against Miss Hearst as so persuasive, some of them say. that when deliberations began here Friday morning they discovered within minutes that all but perhaps three of them considered her guilty and found her story of coercion by her abductors and fear of them unbelievable. Some of them liked Miss Hearst and thought her "sweet." Others thought her "cold." But all of them, apparently, believed she was lying during much of her testimony. These are the highlights of a series of interviews Saturday night and Sunday morning with several of the seven women and five men on the jury. Each said in his own way that the decision to find Miss Hears! guilty of armed bank robbery and of using a firearm (o commit a felony was Ihe "most difficult" of his or her life--more difficult, specifically, t h a n t h e decision to get married or have children or change jobs. The interviews also produced a wide range of obscrvalions about the evidence and the witnesses suggesting that, from the jury's point of view, Ihe trial was, perhaps from the very beginning, weighted overwhelmingly in favor ot the government. When deliberations began, for example, the few who leaned toward acquittal were not firm or intransigent in Iheir beliefs and, indeed, acknowledged that there was little concrete evidence on the defense side lo support their convictions. This situation led others to conclude, perhaps as early as noon Friday, thai a verdict of guilty -- rather lhan a hung j u r y -- was a likely prospect. "It was very clear what the verdict was going to be," one juror said. "It was certainly obvious she was not going lo be acquitted." another said. The emotional strain of Ihe case was apparently severe, with some of the jurors crying openly and even vomiting. 11 never led, however, lo any anger or fights among them--Ihe jurors seemed lo like and re- sped each other. "Every one of us wanted lo believe she was innocent because of Ute conditions, the kidnaping, I mean," said a juror, who, like his colleagues, asked lo remain anonymous. "And when she was first on Ihe witness sland, everyone's heart wenl oul lo her. How could you help.lt? We felt overwhelming sympathy for her, but then, at some point in everybody's m i n d , t h e sympathy was outweighed by the e v i - dence." "We all hated doing it," said another juror. "1 haled it, I didn't enjoy it at all. I'm upsel." ASKED if he regretted his decision, he said, without pausing, "No." . The jurors agreed that Miss Hearst's guill, ralher lhan their prejudice or hardness, led lo her conviction. (Turn to Page A-fi, Coi. 5) CIA information on Oswald told INDEPENDENT -Story on Page A-13 LOK ' G KACH ' CALIFORNIA, MONDAY, MARCH 22, 1976 ^.^.^w.-, ^..^ HE 5-1161 - Cbssified No. HE 2-6959 ^ * '· 36 Pages Vol. 35, No. 161 ~ Moslem forces storm, seize Beirut Holiday Inn fortress TWO LEFT-WING Moslem gunmen fire into the Holiday Inn Hotel with a recoilless rifle on their shoulders in Beirut Sunday shortly before capturing tl. The hotel was defended by right-wing Christian Phalange militiamen. _ AP »«,«,*» By EDWARD CODY BEIRUT, Lebanon ( A P ) -- M o s l e m g u n - m e u a d v a n c i n g behind armored cars captured the 25-story Holiday Inn in a vicious battle Sunday w i t h C h r i s t i a n Phalangists who had used t h e s e a s i d e hotel as a fortress since October. P o l i c e s o u r c e s said more than 40 persons were killed in (he fighling for the h o t e l , including 12 C h r i s t i a n d e f e n d e r s . Another 13 persons were reported k i l l e d and 26 w o u n d e d i n t h e d a y ' s fighting outside of Beirut. Brig. Aziz Ahdab, who proclaimed himself provisional military governor in a March II coup, said he had formed a 14-man mili- t a r y c o m m a n d council aimed at forcing Christian President Suleiman F r a n - j i c h lo resign. Franjieh was in t h e presidenlial palace f i v e miles east of Beirut being defended by nearly 2,000 loyal soldiers and militiamen. Ahdab said in a commu- nique the new command was formed to coordinate " c x p e c l c d operations" (Turn to Back Pg. Col. 1) VIRGINIA BOSWORTH, Patricia Hearst's sisler, ducks the cameras as her father, Randolph Hearst talks to a reporter before visiting Patty in San Mateo County jait Sunday. -APWIrtpkola U.S. prepares to send Patty to L.A. for trial By UNDA DEUJSCII SAN FRANCISCO (AP) --Patricia Hearst's father paid a jailhousc visil to his daughter, now a convicted bank robber, Sunday while attorneys began wrangling over how soon Ihe news- p a p e r heiress could be hnsllcii to Los Angeles (or arraignment on more serious charges. A grim-faced Randolph A. Hearst emerged from the San Matco County Jail after t w o hours and IS minutes. He said of his daughter, convicted a day earlier of willfully taking part in a lerrorisl bank holdup, "She's all right," then drove back to Ihe Nob Hill apartment where his wife, Catherine, was in seclusion. "She doesn't feel very well today," he said of his wife. Hearst told reporters the verdict had been a shock lo the family. " S u r e , we w e r e s u r - prised and shocked by it," he said, "ll was a (lisa- pointment to all of us." He was accompanied by Miss Hearst's sisler, V i r - ginia, and her husband,' Jay Bosworth. A psychiatrist who testified for Miss Claudine Longet arrested in shooting death of skier ASPEN. Colo. (AP) - "' anticipate Miss Lon- Valley Hospital, where he Singer-actress C l a u d i n e get will be charged some- was dead on arrival short- Longel has been arrested l i m c Monday in connec- ly after 5 p.m. in connection w i t h the t i o n w i l n l h c shooting · Tucker declined lo say shooting dcalh of Vladimir ( l c a l h of M r - Sabich," how many times Sabich "Spider" S a b i c h ' who Tucker said in a lelephonc had been shol or d o m i n a t e d the w o r l d interview. He said thc body was professional ski tour in the Tucker said the charges being removed to Denver cirly 1170s according [o w o u l d ** (ilcd in P i t k i n for an autopsy. Dist Ally Frank Tucker C o u n t y District C o u r t The sheriff's office re- Miss Longc't 33 Ihe cs- hm ' fused Io rclcasc a n ' d °- Inniied w i f e of s i n g e r Tucker said Sahich died tails of Ihe incident, bu( A n d y Williams, w a s a al his home in an cxclu- said a full investigation close friend of Sabich The sive subdivision near this would be undertaken. two were «een together Rocky Mountain ski resort 11 a l s o refused to re- (requcntly town ' rom a snot '' red ' casc a n y detai ' s of Ihe Tucker said Miss Lon- from a handgun. shooting. get p o s t e d n personal Earlier, Dr. C h a r l e s Sabich, who competed recognizance bond at lhc Williams, thc county coro- in Ihe 1968 Olympics, turn- Pitkin County sheriff's of- w. " id .Sabich 30, had cd pro early in 1971, when f i c e S u n d a y and was been slwl in Ihe abdomen, released " p w a s taken lo Ihe Aspen $1 million tuna boat tips over in drydock A lil-fool tuna boat valued al more than SI million lipped over Sunday night while it was in a S,m Pedro drydock for repairs The freak accident at Ihe ,\\ Larson Boat Yard apparently caused extensive damage to thc boat's superstructure, although no precise eslimatc was immediately available. iPiclure on Page A-3.) Late Sunday night, dock workers and Los An- gclcs (ireboat crewmen still were attempting to right thc boat, which lay al about a 45-degree angle in thc drydock, b j filling (he dock with water. The boat, the Constellation, is owned by Pan Pacific Fisheries of S.w Pedro. Officials at thc scene said they did not know what caused the accident and they would no! be able to determine how much damage was done lo the boat and (he duck unli! a f t e r Ihe vessel was righled. A spokesman lor the owner said the boat w.is in drMlock for routine maintenance and he still hoped it could be repaired by the original April 26 deadline. 1 12 arrested at Anaheim Who concert Police arrested and ciled 112 persons S u n day night at Anaheim Stadium as a group of aboul 500 people wilhoul tickets tried to crash their way into a concert by the rock group Thc Who The arrests and citations w e r e mostly f o r d r u n k c n e s s a n d m a r i j u a n a use. M o r e lhan 60.000 al- lended the day-long con- r e r l , a n d police s a i d Ihere w e r e no major problems until darkness fell a n d Ihe world-fa- m o u s E n g l i s h r o c k group took thc stage. Two concert-goers s u f - fered minor injuries. Shares honor with Palm Springs L.B. nation's hot spot Long Beach lied with An estimated 70,000 very crowded." P a l m Springs as thc persons trooped to Ihe M o r c sunny weather warmest spol in the na- Long Bcach shore for More lhan 225,000 per- . s ij,ihi|y cooler lem- lion on Ihe firsl Sunday w h a l a l i f e g u a r d de- sons visited South Bay of spring, as an cstimat- scribed as "just a really and other Los Angeles peralurcs arc expected ed t h i r d of a million nice day out." C o u n l y b e a c h e s , l i f e - loday, wilh a forecast S o u t h l a n d r e s i d e n t s No rescues w e r e re- guards said, b u l very high temperature of 78 in flocked to Ihe beaches. ported, perhaps partly [ w rescues were report- , . B o l h cities recorded because a w a t e r tern- cd. L o n g Bcach a n d temperature highs of 87, peralurc of 5!) d i s c o u r - near-Sfl. warmer l h a n Honolulu a g e d sunbathers f r o m Few riptides and small by six degrees. By con- becoming swimmers. waves were reported at Sunny skies and ttm- Irasl Inlcrnalional Falls. Seal Bcach lifeguards South Bay beaches, ami M i n n . , was the coldest estimated 8,000 bcachgo- lifeguards said ihey kept Denatures in the 7» and spol in thc 18 contiguous crs visited (heir mile of swimmers clear of the sOs are forecast for lhc slates with a low of five sand in the "first real riptides lhal did appear. ( j cil;rts below zero. day of 'summer,'" while Lifeguards in Us An- lluntington B e a c h l i f e - Southland pa rus were · , ,,,. , h gcles a n d Orange conn- guards^id 28.CXX) beach- ^ j a m m e d p ice C o m p l e t e weather, tics said beaches were goers made that stretch sald ' h " 1 ttlc f ic w " c TO Page B-5. »rTM*»A h,,t ih n r« ,i-^r^ Zt ct^r^ "i^rv ni^ and serious disturbances. second season. , few problems. 2 flif* in «f ii/^ffi/ demonstrations A -r ·.··;··'. -vx'W"'^ · ;· ·:··':":, v-rrwi-^ -·";·! ** **-* * 1.1 Ol I* V* O J* *- HI-' **M \JA M-fJt-M. (4 I- 4 *J **k_7 { , * / . - ' ' ,4, ,-..". ,···*». '-. · 'ij.w-j f ··"· · - ,- , 3 * - . ,, . " ·'-"·:, " *-it' \f%t.xr f' ·$· *£ V B U oi · rni · i» ·i»^» ^ TOXXA.YIQ INDEPENDENT ·S. terminates lhai t acuities n fll · CAMPAIGN '76 on Page A-4. New York Times Service prc.scnce here and its con- IQ 3.000 troops in Thailand installations on the fringe £.-,; tinuation for another four indefinitely to operate a of Ihe southeast Asian re- ?.] , CONFIDENCE in the Establishment R\\T,KOK Thailand months. siring of facilities indud- gion. r-jj n t I f l - v o i r low Pa PC A - I f ) The United SmA tmnT ! " alc Sunda ' n 'S h l - a f l c r '"S a top secret electronic Bui it is such transfers j v j a l l u c a r 10W ' ' a S e A l u n i t r d il f , w r a t n n a t i K TM emergency c a b i n e t espionage base at R a m a - thai are most damaging, ,;.; ,,,,...,, ,.,,,,,, , .. 4 . ?icnitie inThSd Sun meeting of the Thai mili- sun in northeastern Thai- in strategic terms, abmil f;| · CONSUMERS leading the way in div in nrpnariiinn f o r i i ^ lary supreme commander land. the Thai gou-rnment deci- H economic recovery. Page A - l l . final military withdrawal and chicf of thc n a t i o n a l During Saturday night sion lo force all American t. as several thousand s t u - police. Premier K u k r i 1 and into the early hours operational ^itary per- |;1 K E L L E y sccks m o r c wiretapping , f e n i ^ rfrmnn^r-iirvl in Pramoj said lhal a slalc Sunday morning, thc f a - sonncl out ot rhailana. ^ , ,, , , , · , · . ,_ ^DT n nae . . 1 1 r o n t of The American of emergency would not be cilities al R a m a s u n . as While some 270 mi itary , a u t h o r i t y for FBI. Page A-14 E m b a s s y in doTnlown declared s i n c e Sunday's well as Ihe Air Force seis- o f f i c i a l s w i l l remain to .;) Banckok d o w n l o w n d e m o D s t r a l i o n s e n d e d mic station al Chitng Mai. administer the M million ;/ , SOLAR CELLS - energy source of peacefully. the satellite tracking s l a - aid program lo the Thai £..-, h ( { p R ] At l e a s t two persons In an unexpexpec.ed t.on al Koh Kha ar-d the TM^.-^TM«S( 3 es ^ · t, were killed and 50 injured move Saturday, the Thai air t r a f f i c control facilities has relied on me nejriy j following an explosion in government announced it al Ihe huge Air Force base I w o d o u ' n monitoring, ; ] (he m i d s t of a c r o w d was ordering all but 270 at Utapao were all switch- tracking a n d communica- .- ,\mus«ments . . . A-» Life/Style Bfi-7 marching t h r o u g h the A m e r i c a n m i l i t a r y person- cd off and their operations lion* silts still scaitcrc-a ; j a»ssified C4 Obilnaries C-t capital lo Ihe embassy r ,cl lo leave Thailand by a p p a r e n t l y transferred a c r o s s Thailand t o r a :- . Crossword . . . . . A - 1 2 Shipping B-5 compound lo demonstrate July The Cniled States u n d e r long-standing con- broad v a r i e t y of top secret ;· ? Editorial B-2 Sports CI-5 a g a i n s t Ihe A m e r i c a n had sought to maintain up ungency plans lo existing operalions. i'\ Financial A - l l Television .'..·..'. B-S

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