Independent from Long Beach, California on April 4, 1963 · Page 28
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 28

Publication:
Location:
Long Beach, California
Issue Date:
Thursday, April 4, 1963
Page:
Page 28
Start Free Trial
Cancel

Russians Claim Longevity · . . . maybe they lost count slates Vacation Fun * TOPS IN HAlRSmiNG ';; Long Beach hairstylists walked off with top honors in recent 16th annual X West Coast Spring Hairstyling and Beauty Show in San Francisco, winning ;5 the first three places. Pictured with their winning coifs are (standing, from '£ left) Naomi Suzuki of Ponce Beauty 1 College, first - place winner; Russell r.% Thompson, second, and John Don. third, both of Jon Don's Exclusive Coif'. J fures. Models (from left) are Anita Alioto, Millbrae; Donna Phelps, San '_·? Pablo; Janie Spinell, Long Beach. W E , T H E , Lint I IK*. CJI.r, Ttorv. «W» 4. INDEPENDENT-?«ge B-J Lutheran Service Joins Local Couple Our Saviours L u t h e r a n Church was the setting for the March 29 marriage of Sdvie Tollefson and James A. Kavert. The bride, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur ToUefson. 434 Newport Are, wore a gown of peau de sole and carried a cascade bouquet of stephanotis and lilies of the valley centered with a white orchid. She was attended by Diana Bates, maid of honor, and Gayle Tollefson and Margaret Tollefson, bridesmaid. GARY HAVEL'was best man and Allan Tarr, Dennis Mrs. Richard Thomas Couple Wed in Church HaH, Gerald and Carrol Tollefson were ushers. The new Mrs. Kavert was graduated from Wilson High' and California H o s p i t a l School of Nursing, Los Angeles. Her husband, an alumnus of Poly High, is thei son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kavert, Long Beach. Following a honeymoon in Palm Springs, the newlyweds will make their home here. Teeth Are Important to Beauty We are constantly bombarded by dentifrice commercials and reminders to go to the dentist twice a j year. But, do you take as good care of your teeth as you are advised to do? Brushing at least twice a day is really more important to you than to the companies trying to sell a variety of products. Constant and proper care gives you cleaner, prettier teeth for a prettier smile, and also cuts down on painful infections which often result from poor dental habits. Gum massage stirs circulation of blood. Without this m a s s a g e , your gums get soft. « · « · FOOD p a r t i c l e s are trapped when this happens, and decay and infection often f o l l o w . This may sound far from beauty talk but it is not. Your teeth are important to your beauty as weH as to your general health. It pays to take care of them. Two Woodmen Events Slated Woodmen of the World will have a potluck supper Saturday at 630 pja. at II W. Plymouth St. Caterers win furnish fried chicken. Members should bring casserole or salad and desert. Sunday, Alan Brown Camp 907 will host an Easter egg hunt and picnic in Houghton Paric from 1 to 4:30 pjn. M embers may take picnic lunch to the reserved table area. There will be a baseball game and prizes. The Soviet claims a decisive edge in the longevity race, according to Insider's Newsletter. Statistics compiled by Moscow's new Institute of Gerontology, it reports, show there are 16,276 wom- . en in the USSR who have . passed the century mark. Georgians in Russia seem to have cornered the seniority market. According to the i institute report, one Geor- 1 gian gent has just celebrated his 125th birthday; close behind *" m are two others of 122 and 117. · · · · . -SECRETS" on long Red life spilled by the institute officials: healthful climate, proper diet, hard work -and constant happiness. There were no comments on the smoking, drinking or sex habits of the Soviet aged. Institute director D. F. Chebotaryov said last week that some of the 100-plus subjects s t u d i e d never smoked or drank; others indulged in both habits; some had done manual labor, others intellectual work; some never restricted their diets, others gave lifelong preference to certain foods. Next step: I n s t i t u t e sleuths will study aging processes, with an eye not toward prolonged life, but toward preventing premature old age. The scientists predict that 100-year-olds will shortly be as common (and as healthy in the Soviet Union as 60- year-olds are today. from Los Angnn to Mexico offer the over-40 passenger a discount of $2 for every birthday. For example, a 40-year-old woman pays $215 for a {233 round-trip ticket; an octogenarian pays $135 for the 13-day trip. set up cruising accessory shops--customers telephoning the couture house for emergency supplies to replace torn stockings, empty perfume vials or even an escort's gravy-spotted tie. A Dior rescue squad ad- rives with the goods within minutes. A special Easter vacation fun week for elementary age boys and girls win taVc place at Long Beach YWCA. Sixth Street and Pacific Avenue, the week of April The program (from 8 JO to 530 p.m. duly) will include music, craft i, recreational swimming and games. nanned to benefit ths children of working mothers, the vacation activities are supported ty the Community Chest. Registration is being taken at the YWCA by Mary Jane Langstoa. AND L\ PARIS, accord- FASlfST MEANWHILE, here in California, life begins at 40 for Pacific cruises--and the older you are, the cheaper it is. Special s e n i o r citizen cruises on the SS Acapulco a way out of the line at the beauty salon -- without] resorting either to wigs or hair-do-it-yourself," reports the publication. The f a s h i o n capital's booming new beauty business, it seems, is mobile hairdressers--whose "shops" are set up in midget taxis (equipped with compact dryers, manicure tables and an the tools of the beiutifying trade). · CLIENTS get their hair and nails done while traveling to their appointments; operators are apprised ol "bookings" by radio from a central switchboard; when one well-coiffed mademoiselle is dropped off at her destination, cab and coiffeur proceed to the next repair job. Only snarl reported so far the scarcity of stylists who can create a traffic-stopping hairstyle in Paris traffic. The mobile styling fleet operated by a firm calle Monique Desgranges. ha . been so successful that rov ing stylists teams are now booking house calls; those cost more (an additional $5 --plus a fine if the lady lives in a one-hour parkin; zone and her hairdo runs into overtime). P.S. Insiders report thi trend is already spreading. The House of Dior has jus HE 2-5959 now. for 1 your 1 next Banquet or Luncheon; ^ - ' · * r .- ,V ··· - ' ' e - · - Btmtdfutty Rfdfcoraled Facilities UPU FAJtUNGr. ' "HE 7-220Y Los Altos M e t h o d i s t Church was setting for the marriage of Diane Gail Wilson and Richard Eugene Thomas. The bride, daughter of Mr. and Mn. R. A. Wilson Jr., Long Beach, wore a gown of silk organza and carried a bouquet of white roses and orchids. She was attended by her sister. Penny, as maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Linda Sweet, Shiriey Ver- ceHi. Linda Chrtius and Beverly Thomas. · · * · THE BRIDEGROOM, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. E. Thomas. Long Beach, chose Donald Biggs as best man. John Richter, Larry Cesa. Jack Nichon and Dennis Thomas were ushers. FoQowirg a honeymoon in Big Bear, the newfyweds wiH make their home in Long Beach. She attended Glendale CoQege and Long Beach Gty College where she was a member of Entie Nous- He w a s graduated from Long Beach City College find the better job you want, where he was a member cf Read the "Ketp Wanted" ads' Junior Exchange. daily in the Classified section.I Is Elected Director Mrs. Pauline Kincaid, president of Long Beach Insurance Women, was elected regional director for District Vin of the National Association of Insurance Women at the recent Region VIII convention in Disneyland Hotel. Mrs. Kincaid will be instilled at the national association's convention in Dallas, Tex, in June. Superior Court Judge Kenneth Sutherland win speak on court procedure when the local group holds its dinner meeting tonight at Carrie's Santa Fe Restaurant. Two new members. Opal Als- pccgh and Jan Spivy. wil] be installed. WHAT A.V EASY way to ggggg^^^MS^-/^ HOME-SAFE BECAUSE IT'S AMERICA'S LARGEST or AMERICA'S LARGEST BECAUSE IT'S SAFE? COUpAft HOUrS SrZts Aucts ever U fciTCoa ttrerf -JLmtrics's enfy Union dollar t«vinf» association. coupAtr Hours sArtrr KCCOUD* sine* ma, M CM tv«r fctt a penny of Mvinjj entrusted ta Hcma-- a perfect 73-y*»r taftfy record. CQUFAXf HOUrS IfADfXSHfPl Uort pceplt n tarty hif a minion) · **v* mort tnoofly (over 31 binton) at Horn* than at any other cavinc* association in America, CQVFAXC HOUrS VMUUTTtD ACCOUMT*: Acownt* U 51 rruffic* or mora-ther* ts r.» Emit ta th* amount of rwney yro jna? havt to your Horn* Savings account. COUPAKt flOUrS FUlt-TIUt ZJitmiXSSx fond* b by th* IQA of any monJH tan (rcm th« 1st of that month. After th« I0t\ firid* earn from tfi* day they ar» recrfvvi. wtre»thry remain fa yourtecmn* throcxHtte «"4 of the calendar Qcaiter. bios j CQKYWCfiCft T« tcrv« you beCer. Homa rralrv trjncl* offices Can *ny other tavfrrn vtsotiatio* te th« nrton 4.B 4 tmes * year Current anneal rata AMERICA'S ONLY BIIUON-DOLUR SAVINGS ASSOCIATION i o n , . , 1801 Kortn Urf Betdt 6V± »t GoJJet ME 8 8735 ME3031 LONG BEACH 201 E*st Tint St, at Leant HE 6 8231 UKTIVOOD 4509 Lakewood BfviJ. atMAma ME 44909 HOME TORRANCC ISHCrxvensAw. at El Pr*da r A 8 9244 SP53IIS FEDERAL __ ·on uu ira mm mm 5TCSLU. umcx HI UIK nsstuct cwiiirui 761 South Eroadwiy, PACIFIC COAST HWr, LONG «ACHr 1 fi4- -OA4MXU from Ireland I I The women folk of the fishermen, »ho live in the hills of Donegal, loom and knit these superb slirt* and sweaters from the rutural colored wool of the mountain sheep. The intricate sweater designs originated at the heir ths ide and have tome down through eath family for generations. Every sweater proudly bears the aame of the Initter. Both at Marina to bring you the best from Ireland. Cardigan 36-40 Iin.n.l Matching skirt 1(M6 SOJ).! Port fitt s» tfi« Msrlna isioy and Friday 1 0:00 to 9:00. CMhir Osyi 1 0:00 fo 5:30. HE 7-0711

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,200+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free