Independent from Long Beach, California on February 27, 1969 · Page 40
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 40

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Long Beach, California
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Thursday, February 27, 1969
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Page 40
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AT WIT'S END Trading post is family' s in DEAR ABBY INDEPENDENT (AM] PRESS-TELEGRAM |PM)_B-ll Long Beach, Calif., Thurs, ftb. v, i?4» Stop the booze and bags By ERMA BOMBECK My uncle, who rues the day he tied up with this outfit, wrote the courthouse the other day and said, "If you have any plans to get rid of the large cannon in the center of town, please don't tell my wife." In addition to his signature the letter carried those of 14 other male members of our family. That's the thanks we women get for trying to save money. All we've done is to switch around a few pieces of furniture. When I took mother's old bedroom suit, 1 naturally gave my cousin the baby furniture to make room for it. She gave her spare bed to her sister who then gave my aunt her sewing machine. Of course when mother got the new organ, I got the den pieces and gave my aunt the ping pong table. She in turn gave her tilt-back chair lo her mother- in-law. Her mother-in-law pave a card table and four chairs to her other son. My uncle staggered in the other night and said, "When is this game of musical furniture going to stop?" "You are just being dramatic," I said. "You're to take the mattress and springs out of our garage and over to Jean's house and then pick up the love seat from your house and bring it back here." "Can't I even change my shirt? I've been in that rental truck for (hrec solid weeks." "Is it my fault your wife bought new draperies lhat didn't match anything? What's the matter, don't you feel well?" "It's nothing. Only a hernia. I've just got to stop laughing." "This is your last trip. Evelyn's husband is coming over for the storm windows. Our old ones almost fit their breezeway. Isn't that a stroke of luck?" "I wouldn't be surprised if he cast himself adrift in a small rowboat." "I have to get that garage cleared out," I said. "Laying the sod is going to be a mess." HE SWAYED, then steadied himself at the door. "What sod?" "Cousin Harold is clearing off some land and has given it to us for the hauling. I'm sure your wife will want some." "This can't go on," he shouted hysterically. "I've lost my job because of absenteeism, my creditors are taking legal action, my health is failing, 1 don't have any friends any more. Don't you understand, I'm miserable. They even came out and look my colored television set back." "Perfect," I grinned. "You remember my husband's cousin, Lynn? Well, they are getting a new TV set and she said just the other day she had to get rid of her old one. It needs a tube or two, but, let's see ... as long as you've got the truck there, you might as well pick up the rocking chair she was going to pitch. Then I could give mother my overstuffed chair and she could give her sister those end tables and . . . do you know something about the cannon that we haven't heard?" By Abigail Van Buren DEAR ABBY: My husband had too much to drink last night and confessed that the reason he bought me that beautiful beaded bag for St. Valentine's day was because he'd bought one for his girl friend and he felt guilty. Now 1 don't even want the bag. What do you think? HURT DEAR HURT: I think your husband should quit drinking bags. and looking at DEAR ABBY: I can add nothing to your suggestion to the woman whose husband "ignored" her after her hysterectomy. However, for the sake of other women who may postpone or refuse that operation because they feel they may bo considered "less of a woman" by an uninformed husband, let me express my feelings. My wife had a hysterectomy 14 years ago, so I've seen her scar thousands of times. When I notice it 1 always have two feelings. One is sympathy for the pain she suffered to get that scar. Tht other is a feeling of thankfulness that she has it. Without that scar, I wouldn't have her either. I have friends who have no scar to look at. Their children have no mother. "THANKFUL" IN KANSAS CITY DUPLICATE BRIDGE 4 special games slated next week he MRS. ROBERT SOLOMON . . . Young Californians Californians 1 president is installed Presidency of Young Californians was assumed by Mrs. Robert Solomon during ceremonies conducted by Mrs. Dan Nelson following dinner at Hoefly's Restaurant. Mrs. Richard Kiley is retiring president. A silver tray honoring her as "outstanding member of the year" was presented to Mrs. Anthony Lembi. Other leaders are Mmes. William Edwards, James Cross, Harold Adams, Lembi, Barrel Goldsmith, John Leland, James Phillips, Bob Spogli and Earl Knowles. World premiere Southern C a l i f o r n i a Chapter of the International Society for Contemporary Music will present a concert Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. in El Camino Campus Theater, 16007 Crenshaw Blvd. On the program will be the world premiere of "Decima" by Gerald Strang, professor of music at California State College, Long Beach. Miss Moore, S. H. Ruckle recite vows Wedding vows were exchanged by Willa Reid Moore and Stephen H. Ruckle in Us Vegas. Denise Cope and Michael Hackett were honor attendants. The bride is the daughter, of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Moore, 345 Bay Shore. Her bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Ruckle, 301 Pomona. The new Mrs. Ruckle, a Wilson High School graduate, attended Reed College. The groom, also a Wilson High School alumnus, attended Long Beach City College and the University of Oregon. The couple will reside in Long Beach. V JACOBY Expert proves can win The poor experts have been taking a beating all week. They have been going down at contracts that poorer players might make. Today an expert makes a contract. He isn't going to make the best play from a standpoint of strict mathematics but from the standpoint of practical, winning bridge. Expert South took quite a chance when he opened witJi one spade. Some experts just hate to open with two bids. If- West had passed the hand would have played at one spade but West was a bidder and stuck in a takeout double. North passed, just as he would have if West had passed. East bid two diamonds and hoped that nothing too bad would happen to him. South jumped to four spades and hoped lo find a trick somewhere in his partner's hand. WEST OPENED the queen of hearts. South won and counted 10 easy tricks provided he could escape with the loss of only one trump. Then he laid down his ace of spades. He hoped to drop the king or the ]0 but all he collected was the three and four. Then he entered dummy with king of clubs and led dummy's last spade. East played the seven and the time to separate the men from the boys had arrived. South thought awhile. You have nothing to lose NORTH 27 A G 2 V 8 7 5 3 2 · 954 + K73 WEST (D) EAST *3 A K107 4 ¥QJ109 V G 4 · K Q 6 3 4.11087 + QJ86 ^1042 SOUTH A A Q J 9 8 5 V A K 4 A 2 + A95 Both vulnerable West North East South Pass Pass Pass 14k Dble Pass 2 » 4* Pass Pass Pass Opening lead--V Q at a time like this by thinking. Then South played the eight of trumps. West showed out and South spread his hand conceding a trump, a diamond and a club. Why did South make that play? He must have known that a suit will break 3-2 68 per cent of Four special games are scheduled by Long Beach Bridge Clubs in the coming week. They include Bridge Studio, 1604 Cherry Ave., 1 p.m. Sunday; Jewish Community Center, open pairs, 11 a.m. Tuesday; I.W, also at. Jewish Community Center, open pairs, 9:15 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Thursday. Results at Pacific Coast Club: Wednesday evening, N-S, Maribclle Turner-Virginia Eads. E-W, Ruby Perry-Greta Hou«hton. Friday evening. N-S, Gcri Chunk-Alan Rankin. E-W, Nancy Borden-Betty Barnett. Saturday evening, N-S, Diana Olsen-Alan Rankin. E-W, Kitty Morrison-Gerald McDonald. Temple Israel: Monday afternoon, N-S, Evelyn Higgins-Virginia Firestone. E-W, Ledelle Wilson-Bernice Bankman. Villa Park: Thursday evening, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. McColm. E-W, Elgie Jones-Florence Wise. Jewish Community Center: Monday evening, Fanny Connolly-Muriel Seeli- the time but South had listened to the bidding. West had made a vulnerable take-out double. The bid would 'have been dangerous enough if West held a singleton spade or the doubleton king and almost suicidal if West had held king-10- small or 10-small in spades. Therefore South played West for the singleton and was correct. FHEE SKHVICK Warn nn -- Age No Bfirri NEED A JOB? NEED TRAINING? SHORT OF FUNDS? I'aj - 9 Months AFTEK'iiradualion MEDICAL or DENTAL ASSISTING MOBMM; - AKTKH\OO\ - FVKM\G CLASSES SKW KVI;MM; MEDICAL cuss NOW FORMING--STARTS FEB. 10 Long Beach Valley College of Mrdiral and firm*! As*IMnnli 4 1.19 Allitntir Arnitr IBM" Kiioll-l TiHll.-T!liMl.T Hills. ],m,,lt,a,l,.CnhlMrma ')0«07 Call Now (213) 422-0481 interiors PRE-INVENTORY CLEARANCE SALE SIDEWALK SALE ·OIL PAINTINGS - W A L L DECOR · DESIGNER LAMPS · UNIQUE ACCESSORY ITEMS · SELECTE PIECES OF FURNITURE SAVINGS UP TO 40% OFF EX*MPlE OtSlGNtC LAMP KEG. i! ?0~SAVf 48.00 - J72 00 fOP YOU? SHOTPINCJ CONVfcUltNLi AMDCOMFQFT CLJf SME ».'if 8169E.WardIowRd. ^f^ 430-7513 cldrr° da MaVtelS^Card , -$' INTEREST COMPOUNDED DAILY insured savings 5.13% is what you actually earn when the passbook rate is 5% and is compounded daily and maintained for a year. 5 .13 % You earn an additional 1/4% per annum over our current passbook rate of 5% per annum by investing in a three-year bonus certificate. Should you withdraw your Funds prior to thr^^^V three year ttrm .you still earn our current^^ passbook rate. .25 % ger. Tuesday afternoon, N-S, Guin Womack-Hugh Lofton. E-W, Martha Con- Ireras-Adelaide D e a n . Wednesday afternoon, NS, Rex Thompson-Norma Ide. E-W, Lorraine Quinlan-Marian S I o c u m b e. LW Thursday morning, Mae Orloff-Thelma Beals. LW Thursday afternoon, N-S, Vem Baccus-Bill Wright. E-W, Ethel Bur- cliell-Marian P e t e r s . Thursday evening, N-S, Frieda K e n i g s o n-Norm- l.evin. E-W, Mrs. J. R. Peyton-William Metzler. Thursday evening juniors, Ann Levin-Jenny Estcs. Friday afternoon, N-S, Hugh Lofton-Bill Wright. E-W, Ed Koolish-Lane Abraham. B R I D G E STUDIO: Wednesday morning, N-S, M a r s h a Hunter-Lyska Fieldhouse. E-W, Helen McWalter-Annic Stanley. Friday evening, N-S, Helen Arterburn-Winifred C u n - ningham. E-W, Muriel Falknor-Mike Daley. Saturday afternoon, N-S. Frieda K e n i g s o n-Norm l.evin. E-W, Chester Lebcher-Stevc M a c k a s. Saturday evening, Fay Thompson-Bill E a r n e r . · Sunday afternoon, N-S, Roy Foote-Bill Wright. EW, Fay Thompson-Bill Barner. Sunday evening, Richard and John Bakovich. Long Beach's Oldest Jewelers MRS. PRYCE SMITH . . . Petroleum Wives New chairman for Petroleum Club Wives Mrs. Pryce W. Smith, active in Long Beach civic and social affairs, will assume chairmanship of Petroleum Club Wives during installation luncheon March 5 in Petroleum Club, 3636 Linden Ave. Husbands of members will be special guests. Joining Mrs. Smith on the board will be Mines. Albert Miles, Robert Willis and Harry Carrothers. Plans are underway for a champagne brunch and old fashioned "social convivial." From J^tkktl EST. 1925 201 PINE AVE. ot BROADWAY Op.nMonia Diamond Rings in C. C. Lewis' Quality From $165 to $5,750 Budget terms up to 24 months Open Fridays until 9 · Free Park and Shop 333 PINE AVE HE 5-6335 EARNINGS PAID 4 TIMES A YEAR Funds received by the I Oth of any month earn from the first of the month. Funds received after the I Oth earn from the date of receipt. Funds earn to the date of withdrawal, FIRST PEDERAL OF IONS IEACH NOT THE LARCIST-JUST ONE OF THE BEST Until i r. M. Frifeyi FIRST and PINE 135 E. OCEAN AVE. At Pur ftiir Entrinci P H O N E Hlmleck 70211 CHECK DOUBLE CHECK Hooray for the red, white and blue of this two-piece costume with the chic of check. Coat of Acrylic, interestingly detailed; back, half-belted; front high flap pockets. The dress of rayon linen in white and blue, brought together princess style by a thin red streak of a belt. Bravo! $66 Cameo Collection 5029 HAZELBROOK, LAKEWOOD CENTER, 634-4214

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