Altoona Mirror from Altoona, Pennsylvania on November 8, 1929 · Page 31
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Altoona Mirror from Altoona, Pennsylvania · Page 31

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Altoona, Pennsylvania
Issue Date:
Friday, November 8, 1929
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Page 31
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THE ALTOONA MIRROR—FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1929 To Muse and Amuse ay SPORTS EDITOR Huntingdon Asks Game A letter, an official challenge from Huntingdon High, for a football game for 1930 or thereafter has been received' by Altoona High and the letter has been duly received and filed. A letter, similar in nature and Intent,, has been received annually for some> time. The Huntingdon coach asks that; Altoona discard some "weak" teams; and talco on Huntingdon "for a practice game." And that's the exact word- Ing of the letter, too. We are Informed, very reliably too. that as far as Altoona, and other conference teams are concerned, Hunting-j don High is still on probation. And, Huntingdon best knows why. No Game With Huntingdon There won't be any Altoonn-Huhit- tngdon High school football game tlhis year. That's out. There won't be any next year, or the next, or—but why continue? There Just won't be any. And both schools have reasons galore to offer an explanation just why there won't be any meeting.- This column has the reasons—soma of them, at least—why Altoona won't pair off. Here's a letter from the highest authority at Altoona High: "Huntingdon fans see things only as results go in actual games played and then compare things. It's' not a reliable way. As regards Altoona High, the schedule is arranged several years In advance, excepting the first two games, which are 'enlightening games', games to give the coaches a chance to view their,players In action. "As regards Bellefonte High this year, they came third on our list. Altoona was an experimental team In this game and Altoona used, only a few plays, just straight football. Bellefoirtte was beaten without any variety of plays. There can be no figuring' of Altoona strength on the Bellefonte showing. "Huntingdon High was dropped by this conference once. Why? "Altoona High keeps a weekly checkup on all athletes. They muat be up In their studies all the time ojr they do not play football. Does Huntingdon? "Why have other teams cut Huntingdon High on their schedules? / "Now the above questions answer In part why there Is no game. ' "Altoona High has a schedule ' of eleven games, baa contract;. As long as the teams are agreed, as long as rlya'la now on the schedule" are satisfied, Altoona High will make no change. Huntingdon can't -get on Altoona's schedule until Altoona drops some rival, or is dropped. "Who would Altoona put off? "Also there is now a waiting list of seven strong High schools seeking a vacant date with Altooma in Altoona. Three conference members want a two- GRIDIRON BRIEFS. year contract in Altoona. And all these teams must be accommodated before Huntingdon. "Our advice to all conference teams Is this: Play a full schedule of conference members. That is the true way to denote real strength." Editor's note—The above explains everything. Altoona has entirely too many rivals to accommodate. And all of them either beat Alloona In the past or think they can In thfe future. And that's the way to feel about It. No conference team can play every member. The thing to do Is play as many as you can and let the points decide. We'll still have fun galore arguing In behalf of our favorite team just the aam«. Huntingdon Kate§ High Here's a letter from a former Altoona High student It is self-explanatory, and the writer Is Paul Smith, Harris'burg: "It has been quite a few years since I attended old Altoona High, but I do get a 'kick' from your column each time you use it. To my mind it keeps alive a healthy rivalry In high school football in our district, and It prompts this contribution. "The impressive Windber victory certainly proves our adaptability to any kind of weather. "I notice you mention the Huntingdon High team as being good but add that in your opinion we could 'take' them easily. In event of a post-season game between these two teams I hope you won't take this Huntingdon team lightly. I have seen both teams this year and I know Altoona is the best ever, but—the Huntingdon team I saw had everything a football team needs and those boys function, like a college freshman team. "Hoping you can use this Informa-. tion arid that your column continues to grow bigger and bigger." Would like a Game A writer signing his name as "A Fan" and who is a student at Penn State, writes as follows: "Both Altoona and Huntingdon have great High school teams and If not as a conference game, why not have these two fteams matched in a post-season game. I am sure Huntingdon would play. "Being a football fan and interested In the High school western section conference I give much credit to Snaps Emanuel and his gridders this year, but why not give some to Huntingdon High? "Since 1919 J. G. Everhart has been coach at Huntingdon and during this time the team lost only a few games. Several years they were undefeated. Coach Everhart was unable to .fill his schedule with conference games this year. Why?" fay United Press.) PRINCETON, N. J., Nov. 8.—A brief signal rehearsal yfea scheduled for Princeton's varsity today on the final day of practice for the Lehigh game. The Tigers had enough work for two days yesterday when Coach Bill Roper sent his men through a hard scrimmage for three quarters of an hour. Princeton is expected to have on lineup change for Saturday's game. NEW HAVEN, Conn., Nov. 8.— Coach Mai .Stevens has decided to start Wilson at quarterback against Maryland Saturday. Alble Booth will start the second period. A signal drill was to be held today, winding up a fairly light week of work. Yesterday's session consisted of a nominal scrimmage. ANNAPOLIS, Md., Nov. 8.—Navy In ready for the Georgetown game here Saturday. Navy coaches today were expected to sound a note of warning against over conlldence as the entire squad appears to have decided that Navy Is a sure winner against the hllltoppers. HAMILTON, N. Y., Nov. 8.—Colgate's squad of 25 players, coaches and trainers entrained Thursday night for New York where they will play Colu.nbia Saturday. Coach Kcrr plans to start the lineup which played against Hampden-Sldney last week. NEW YORK, Nov. 8.—Sixty minutes scrimmage against the junior varsity Thursday completed Columbia's intensive practice for Saturday's game with Colgate. The session was devoted to building a defense against Colgate plays, which were used to good advantage by the Jayvees. SYRACUSE, N. Y., Nov. 8.—Al Kanya and John Hollis replaced Novak and Vanness in Syracuse's line Thursday as the upstaters held their final drill for Saturday's game with Niagara, and'Coach Lew Andreas Indicated that these men will start the game. Loucks, Tltmas and Frank are fighting for the quarterback post with Frank the probable choice. RESERVE TEAM WINS. The Hurricane reserve grid team beat the Juniata Aces 21-7 yesterday on the Prospect field. Ward scored for the losers in the .third period. Lineups: Juniata Aces Hurricane Reserves I ST. FRANCIS MEETING ST. VINCENT ON MONDAY LORETTO, Nov. 8.—No bear stories are being sent out from St. Francis for the annual clash Monday with her traditional rival, St. Vincent's, college. Coach Donohoe and Ingolsby are driving the squad this week through one of the season's hardest practice periods and the team will be definitely, particularly and especially pointed for this biggest game of the season. Lacking only Salony and with every other player In pink of condition, St. Francis will be there In perfect condition and with bells on. If they should lose they will have no alibis. "Beat St. Vincent's" is the motto at St. Francis this week. The walls of the dignified old college halls ar"e flam- Ing with banners bearing this battle cry. Every meal, is a "pep" meeting. At breakfast, dinner and supper each day there Is a speech about the coming game. There will be a general exodus from St. Francis campus Saturday morning that will leave hardly enough men around to keep up the fires. BUNDKE tO BOX AGAIN. NEW YORK, Nov. 8.—Johnny Dundee of New York, former featherweight champion and veteran of more than 500 bouts, has changed his mind about retiring and will meet Georgia Goldberg of Brooklyn in a 10-round bout at Broadway arena, Brooklyn, Nov. 12. HARVARD, YALE, PRINCETON ARE PICKED TO WIN HARD BATTLES By LAWRENCE PERRY. Buffalo, N. Y., Nov. 8.—Westward Fareas the Army football squad • of . some forty men, with trainer, coacher and a number of officers who are attached to the academy in a pedagogical or a military 1 capacity.' The outfit will stop at Danville, 111., to enable the players to rest undisturbed by the blare and hurly-burly of a nlght-before-the-game. Practice will be held In that town this afternoon and the night will be spent there. After an early luncheon the expedition will move on the Champaign, returning to Danville after the game, leaving there for West Point at 11 o'clock Saturday night, arriving at the Military academy on Sunday evening. Captain Biff Jones and his assistant coaches are hopeful t>ut not optimistic about the outcome of the game with Illinois. It is known that Bob Zuppke has been piloting his eleven through the season thus far -with this mammoth game in view, has taken other contests pretty much In his stride. None the less, Illinois has shown enough to convince Army scouts that she has not only latent possibilities but a lot of present ability and no one has any idea other than that this Urbana outfit is the toughest customer that the cadets have encountered to date. The cadets, of course, are confident they have It In them to make a showing sufficiently good to down the Illlni and in the midst of his youthful enthusiasm, It Is difficult to maintain • a judicial frame of mind. Just the same the writer cannot combat the feeling that Illinois stands to win this game. Brown-Dartmouth. Dartmouth Is picked to win the game after a battle. Harvard-Michigan. An Important intersectlonal game, which will be hard fought and may go either way. But the writer thinks that Wolverine weakness on the wings is likely to help Harvard through to victory. Stanford-Washington. Stanford, of course. Chicago-Wisconsin. The Badgers have just got to beat some team be- fore they are through. The midway team will give them a real fight but Wisconsin should win. Georgia-New York University. Georgia spirit alone should prevail over the violet all other things being equal, but with downs not playing at quarter, the going will be tougher. None the less Georgia is picked to win. Georgia-Tech-Vanderbilt. Tech is picked to win. Iowa-Minnesota. The Gophers are likely to prove too powerful for a flne Hawkeye outfit. Pittsburgh-Washington and Jefferson. Pittsburgh should win. Utah-Colorado College. This is an important Rock mountain game which the Utes will probably win. If Dutch Clarke can get started, he may upset this dope but in the last two games he has been anchored. Northwestern-Ohio State. Northwestern has a high pressure defense which alone can cause a rival • to crack. The Evanston team is picked. Holy Cross-Boston University. Holy Cross should win. Pennsylvania-Penn State. Old Penn should take this game. Prlnceton-Lehigh. An Inferiority complex should beat the Lehigh team. Texas-Baylor. Texas is selected aa the winner over o. team that started fast and slumped. Southern Methodist will beat the Texas Aggies, Navy-Georgetown. Georgetown la likely to be a bit tired, but then so Is Navy. Navy, however, may be less so' and is picked as a winner. Utah Aggies should beat the Colorado Aggies. Yale should defeat Maryland. Noth Carolina will probably beat South Carolina.' R. Rickard LE .., P. Willard LT .. C.Johnson....... LG .. G. Martin C ... L. Myers RG .. B. Nevedol RT .. J. Graham RE .. G. Graham QB .. S. Lego LHB . G.Williams..... RHB . W. Ward FB .. Score by periods: Hurricane Reserves Juniata Aces .' ...T. Germano C. Fusco L. Lastort . ...J. Hammer N. Fasona ...W. Billardo —A. Lardieri , .M. DeMatteis T. Burke .. .M. Cipriano A. Valli 14 0 0 7—21 0 0 7 O-L 7 See and Hear the New VICTOR—RADIO AT WOLF'S 1501-03 llth Ave. Aulo Accessory and Radio Supply Sale ZIP AUTO & RADIO SUPPLY CO. 1514 llth Ave. Altoona, Fa. Open Every Evening YOUNG MEN/ 1 ./•HOP AITOOM M. gaWfSfl H13 ELEVENTH STREET GENERA Touchdowns, T. Burke, M. Cipriano, M. DeMatteis. Point after touchdown, Lardleri (pass), DeMatteis and Germano (rush). Substitutions—Hurricanes: Farrell for T. Germano, Pretolo for Fasona, W. Fasona for C. Fusco, Caputo for Lardieri, T. Germano for A. ! Valli. j Referee, B. Ehredt. Umpire, Ed. i Reese. Head linesman, Wisslnger. Time I of quarters, 10-8-8-10. 1 Goes a long way to make friends. J. A. LEAP 1722 Eleventh Ave. Copley $12.50 $15.50 Clothes 1411 Eleventh Ave. Shot Gun Shells RANGER TScBox SUPER X $1.20 Box S. J. Wolf Hardware Co. 171Z llth Ave. Phone 8-7018 Y Work'Stuff for Workmen Genuine Indianapolis Work Gloves Featuring the FRIEDMAN- SHELBY ALL LEATHER WORK SHOE *°UD UATMCR HEtlS sOUB UATHM SflUS* INSOtU Army Field Shoes tor Hard Jobs $2.88 16 In. Black Hi- Top Shoes, water welt double sole. $5.88 Double Sole Scout Shoes $1.98 Black Moccasin Toe Shoes, double vole, heavy upper and Insole. $2.98 AU Leather Shoes, double toe and solo. $3,48 All Leather Shoe, Black, plain toe, oak sole and insole, heavy upper. $2.98 P. B. B. CHECKS CASHED Al's Workmen's Store ALL TYPES OF SPOUT AND WOBK CLOTHES 11*0 Eleventh Street OPPOSITE YOUNG MEN'S SHOP Never Loses its Appeal Here's a cigar that you'll enjoy smoking five or ten" years from now, just as much as the day you lighted your first one. Uniform, mild, rich, mellow—that's Tl eres the young lads are going to like. Its the new Burgundy dark brown •• featured by Carlson -in a very smart HomLurg shape, with a slight roll to its trim looking' brim, The color is beautiful »». and any way you look at it, its a clever hat. Askfbr The Carlson Burgundy Brown By Common Consent The Leading Hatter" 1416 Eleventh Avenue Gable's STORE FOR MEN SUITS Overcoats Tuxedos ALWAYS $ 21 .50 In Our Newly Opened Section Here In Gable's Can Be Found Altoona's Finest IMen's Apparel at $21.50. . . . No Charge for Alterations Suits That Were Made to Sell for $30 to A ND the Men of this city are becoming aware **• of this fact in increasing numbers daily. Many smart models offered at a price that is unusually low for such quality garments. Suits are single or double-breasted with peaked or notched lapels. In plain color cassimeres, serges and worsteds as well as fancy striped patterns. Sizes 34 to 48. Overcoats and Topcoats of camel hair, chinchilla curl and fancy mixtures. Tuxedos are trimmed with Skinner's satin. MEN'S STORE—SECOND FLOOR Defiance TIRES IV- Built Right Built by a large, reputable company, located in Akron. This company employs only expert workmen. One of its strict rules is to use only the best material. In Defiance, the tread, side-wall, bead and carcass are all perfectly blended into a balanced tire. There is no weakness anywhere. Bought Right More than 200 of the leading department btores- have pooled their buying power to' the extent that matchless savings are affected. There is no expense added to the r actory mill door price. Our price is the lowest price on equal first quality merchandise. Defiance Tires Guaranteed Right No Mileage Limit! No Time Limit! For the entire life of the tire against defects workmanship and material. in Size 30x3^ Cl $ 30x3i/£ Gt 30x3i/l SB 31x4 32x4 33x4 32x4 r /i I 33x4^ 1 34x4^ ] 30x5 ] 33x5 r... 1 35x5 ! 29x4.40 29x4.50 30x450 -..• 28x4.75 29x4.75 30x4.75 29x5.00 30x5.00 31x5.00 Super Defiance Size Tire Tube 29x4.40 ..'. $ 9.45 $1.35 29x4.50 9.75 1.40 30x4.50 9.95 1.45 29x5.00 11.45 1.65 30x5.00 11.65 1.75 31x5.00 11.95 1.85 28x5.25 12.45 1.95 29x5.25 12.65 2.00 30x5.25 12.95 2.10 31x5.25 13.25 2.20 29x5.50 13.35 2.30 30x5.50 13.65 2.35 30x6.00 14.45 2.45 31x6.00 14.95 2.55 32x6.00 15.45 2.65 33x6.00 15.95 2.75 30x6.50 16.45 2.95 31x6.50 16.95 3.10 32x6.50 17.45 3.20 30x6.75 18.95 3.25 32x6.75 19.95 3.45 llth AVENUE BUILDING—BASEMENT

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