Indiana Gazette from Indiana, Pennsylvania on October 26, 2002 · Page 8
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Indiana Gazette from Indiana, Pennsylvania · Page 8

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Saturday, October 26, 2002
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PageS RELIGION Saturday, October 26,2002 MINUTE MEDITATIONS Christian Zionists stand with Israel Michele Huey Bad hair days Scripture reading: Everyone did what was right in his own eyes. —Judges 21:25 (NXJV) "My hair is going through an adolescent stage," I announced to my hairdresser one day. "It won't do what I want it to do." Ever since I had started taking medication for a cold, my locks wouldn't lay right. At first I blamed it on my hair being out of shape. So I carved some time out of my schedule and got it trimmed. It turned out shorter than I'd planned. And it still wanted to do its own thing. So I bought some spritz, but that only stiffened it more in its rebellion. I could let it grow out — but that would take time — or lop more off. While I decided, life went on, with or without bad hair days. My stubborn hair reminds me of my own stubborn heart. 1, too, go through stages of obedience and rebellion. During the times of obedience, I set time aside daily to read the Bible and pray. God and I are on great terms. But then something happens — I get sick or busy or stressed when a situation doesn't turn out the way I want it to — and I find excuses to put .off reading and praying. "I just don't feel like it," I reason. "God understands." But the real reason I put God off during those times is that I'm pouting. I want my own way. God, in His infinite patience, however, keeps working with those stubborn wisps in my nature until they finally come under His control. Sometimes He has to lop off those areas that give Him (and me) the most grief. But, little by little, He shapes and trims my inner nature so that someday I won't ever have to worry about bad hair days again. Thank you, Lord, that You don't give up on me as easily as I give up when life gets a little "hairy."Amen. Michele T. Huey is a Gazette staff writer. Her Minute Meditations appear every Saturday. E-mail comments on this column to mthuey@penn.com. Laos rejects discrimination accusation VIENTIANE, Laos (AP) — Laos officials are refuting a recent U.S. State Department report that accuses the communist government of religious discrimination in this predominantly Buddhist nation. The allegations "contradict the reality of religious freedom" in Laos, the Foreign Ministry said in an Oct. 18 statement in the pro-government Vientiane Times newspaper. "The report lacks reliable information and indicates a bias aimed at creating misunderstanding among the world population about the true situation," the ministry said. "The fact is that the Lao people's lives are secured with rights." The International Religious Freedom Report for 2002, submitted Oct. 7 to the U.S. Congress, reviews religious freedom in 192 countries. The report said Laos, in Southeast Asia, has made some improvements, but that the government has closed churches and generally inhibits "religious practice by all persons, especially those belonging lo minority religions, particularly Christianity, that fall outside of the mainstream Buddhism." POKE AROUND PUNXSUTAWNEY WITH MICHELE HUEY ON SUNDAYS ByTATSHA ROBERTSON The Boston Globe WASHINGTON — Judy and Jerry Ball, born-again Christians from the Bible Belt, did not know any Jews and did not care about Jewish issues until about five years ago, when Judy Ball received what she described as the "calling" to urge fellow Christians to pray for the security of Israel. "I didn't have any love for Israel. I didn't know about Zionism. I didn't know anything about the Jews," said Judy Ball, 61, as she stood in the Israeli Embassy, wearing a gold Star of David around her neck. "But my heart is changed." The two retired educators from North Carolina belong to a large and growing network of conservative Christians who have evolved into unlikely, but important, allies of Israel in the United States. Called Christian Zionism, the movement has rolled across the nation, from Pentecostal churches in Mississippi to congregations in Colorado and parts of Massachusetts. The movement's leaders include Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell. The Christian Zionists are driven by a literal interpretation of the Bible, which they believe prophesied the establishment of a Jewish state in 1948 as a prelude to the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. Christian Zionists have raised miU lions of dollars for Israeli causes, and lobbied the Bush administration and Congress to support the expansion of Jewish settlements on the West Bank Several thousand participated in a Christian Solidarity for Israel Rally, which was sponsored by the Christian Coalition, the fundamentalist political group, earlier this month in Washington. "This rally is to say there are people, there are" millions of us," said Robertson, the coalition's founder. "We will stand with Israel." Such support, however, has drawn a skeptical reaction from some Jewish leaders, who question the wisdom of the alliance because conservative Christians believe that Jews will accept Jesus after Judgment Day, or "the end of days." "The problem I have is with eschatology, the view of the end of days. They are very supportive of the Jews to get back to Israel, but it is a means to the end," said Robert O. Freedman, a professor of political science at Baltimore Hebrew University. Not all Christians believe that the establishment of a Jewish state in the Mideast is a sign of the end of time, which is to culminate in the battle of Armageddon, fought in Israel. According to this reading of biblical prophecy, many Jews will die and the survivors will accept a messiah. "We believe the messiah is Jesus Christ," said the Rev. James M. Hutchens, president of Christians for Israel USA, That and another belief of many Christian Zionists, that God will give the Holy Land to Christians, infuriates many Jews. But that prophesy has not led Israel to reject Christian support in the here and now. "What is interesting in the whole debate is a lot of Israelis are willing to say they are tactical allies, and who knows what will happen in the end of days. Meanwhile, a lot of Jews are willing to cooperate because Israel doesn't have a lot of friends in the world," Freedman said. Shari Dollinger, officer of interreli- gious affairs at the Israeli Embassy in northwest Washington, described the support from Christian Zionists as heartfelt and significant. The government of Israel has acknowledged conservative Christians' willingness to help and has eagerly courted them. Last week, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon met with thousands of American Protestants in Israel. The embassy hosts monthly meetings — the Balls attended a week ago — to promote dialogue between Jews and Christian Zionists. Rabbi David Saperstein, director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism in Washington, is a skeptic of the alliance who suggested that Christian Zionists' vision of an apocalyptic future could have a bearing on the present. "Those who see the increasing violence in that region as a fulfillment of the building of Armageddon might well oppose American efforts to defuse tensions and bring stable peace," Saperstein said. "That could be dangerous to Israel, to the Arabs, and to America." Saperstein also questioned whether the Christian right's support is motivated by its positions on domestic issues: "If some in the reli- gious right believe their support of Israel will make Jews more accepting of tearing down the walls of church and state and to issues of women's right to choose or dismantling of social welfare — well, they are sadly mistaken." Hutchens and Stanley Wachtstet- ter, a Pentecostal minister from Mississippi, asserted that their church's support of Israel is based solely on its religious belief in the state of Israel. Wachtstetter, who attended the same embassy meeting as the Balls, said that as a child he attended a Pentecostal church in Indiana. At the time, he said, he knew only one Jew, and did not believe in the liberal causes embraced by many American Jews. However, Wachtstetter said he had always loved Israel. Bridges for Peace, the oldest Christian Zionist group, has contributed more than $20 million to immigration and social-assistance programs in Israel over the last five years. The combined support for Israeli programs from Christian Zionist groups runs into tens of millions of dollars a year, said Bridges for Peace chairman and president Clarence Wagner. Announcements Saturday evening services • Church of the Resurrection: > Ernest— Mass, 5:30. > Heilwood—Mass, 6. > Glen Campbell — Mass with children's Liturgy of the Word, 6. • SS. Simon and Jude Catholic Church, Blairsvilie. Mass, 6. • St. Bernard of Clairvaux Catholic Church, Indiana. Mass, 5:30. • St. Francis Catholic Church, Coral. Mass, 6. " St. John the Baptist Orthodox Church, Black Lick. Vespers at 6, followed by confession. • St. Thomas More University Parish, Indiana. Mass, 5. • Trinity United Methodist Church, Indiana. Service, 5. • Zion Lutheran Church, Indiana. Spoken Eucharist, 5:30. Sunday services Note: Times listed are morning unless otherwise noted. • Alverda Christian Church. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:45. • Alverda Faith Tabernacle. Worship service, 11. Sunday school, 10. Evening, 6. B Alverda Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Route 553. Service, 9:30. Sunday school, 10:45. • Ambrose Baptist Church. Worship service, 9:30. Sermon: "Lord's Supper Meditation," based on Psalm 23:2. » Armagh United Methodist Church. Prayer and praise, 9. Sunday school, 10:30. • Bethany Chapel, Marion Center. Service, 10. Sunday school, 9. Evening service, 7. • Bethel Presbyterian Church, 1 mile east of Route 286 near Aultman. Service, 11. Sunday school, 9:45. " Beulah Baptist Church, Indiana. Service, II. a Bible Baptist Church, Clymer. Service, 11. Sunday school, 10. Evening service, 7:30. • Black Lick Presbyterian Church. Service, 10. Sermon topic: "Reformation Sunday," based on Isaiah 43. Children's Sunday school, 10:30. • Black Lick Circuit, United Methodist Church. > Strangford — Service, 8:30. Sunday school, 9:15. '*• Hopewell — Service, 9:30. Sunday school, 10:30. '*• Black Lick— Service, 11. Sunday school, 10. • Blairsvilie Church of Christ. Service, 11. Evening service, 6. • Blairsvilie United Presbyterian Church. Service, 11. Sermon: "The Greatest Law," based on Exodus 19:1-2, 9-18 and Matthew 22:34-40. Sunday school, 9:45 • Brush Valley Chapel. Worship, 9:15. Bible study, 8:30. " Bryan Hill Fellowship, Indiana. Service, 10:30. • Calvary Baptist Church, Clymer. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:45. Evening worship, 6. • Calvary Bible Church, Glen Campbell RD I between Deckers Point and Rochester Mills. Service, 11. • Calvary Evangelical Free Church, Indiana. Service, 11. Sunday school, 9:30. • Calvary Presbyterian Church, Indiana. Service, 11. Sunday school, 9:45. • Center Presbyterian Church, Creekside. Service, 11:15. • Christ Bible Fellowship, Indiana. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:45. St. Bernard of Clairvaux Catholic Church 1 MASS SCHEDULE: Saturday Mass at 5:30 P.M. Sunday at 7 A.M., 8:30 A.M., 10 A.M. and 12:00 P.M. RECONCILIATION: Saturday 3:30-4:00 P.M. 200 Clairvaux Drive, Indiana IN CONCERT — "March Forth," a southern gospel singing group, will be in concert at the Homer City Christian & Missionary Alliance Church, located on Old Route 119 South, on Sunday at 6:30 p.m. The group was honored by being invited to sing at the 2002 National Quartet Convention in Louisville, Ky. The group has completed three recordings and will be recording their fourth in January 2003. The concert is open to the public. • Christ Episcopal Church, Indiana. Services, 8 and 10:30. Sunday school, 9:15. • Christian & Missionary Alliance Church, Blairsvilie. Service, 10:45. Sunday school. 9:30. Evening service, 7. • Christian & Missionary Alliance Church, Clymer. Worship, 11. • Christian & Missionary Alliance Church, Warren and Ben Franklin roads, Indiana. Services, 8 and 10:45. Sunday school, 9:30. Evening service, 7. • Christ Our Savior Orthodox Church, 6221 Tanoma Road, 3 miles west of Clymer off Route 286. Divine Liturgy, 10. Sunday school, 9. • Church of Christ, old Route 119 north of Indiana. Services, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. • Church of God, Route 22, eight miles east of Blairsvilie. Friday Sabbath service, 7 p.m. Sunday service, 10:30. Sunday school, 9:30. • Church of the Resurrection: *r Ernest — Mass with children's Liturgy of the Word, 10:30. 'f Clymer — Mass with children's Liturgy of the Word, 11. /- Heilwood — Mass with children's Liturgy of the Word, 9. > Rossiter — Mass with children's Liturgy of ihcWord, 8:30. • Circle of Faith Church, Route 56, Avonmore. Service, 10:30. H Clymer Alliance Church. Worship, 11. • Clymer Christian Church. Service, 9. • Clymer Presbyterian Church. Service, 10. Sunday school, 8:45. » Clymer United Methodist Church. Service, 11. Sunday school, 10. • Community Bible Church of Jtfany voices... united in one Spirit CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH "The big redstone church on the corner" CLASSES FOR ALL AGES - 9:45 a.m. MORNING WORSHIP - 11:00 a.m. Traditional service in the Sanctuary James D. Patten, preaching "Unfinished Business" • Evening Song - 6:00 p.m. Candlelight Taiz6 service, in the Chapel www.calvarypres-Indiana-pa.org Sagamore. Service, 11. Sunday school, 9:30. » Cookport Baptist Church. Service, 11. Sunday school, 9:45. • Cornerstone Christian Fellowship Center, New Florence. Worship, 10. Sunday school, 9:30. Evening service, 7. • Cornerstone Worship Center, Indiana. Services: traditional, 8:30; contemporary, 10. Sermon: "lieli: A Biblical Perspective." Sunday school, 9. Evening service, 6:30; movie: "Escape from Hell." • Creekside United Methodist Church. Service, 9:30. Sunday school, 10:30. » Crete Presbyterian Church, Old Route 56 off Route 286 southwest of Indiana. Worship, 10:45. Sermon: "From Commandment to Grace," based on Matthew 22:34-40. Special music provided by Scott Weber, a violinist with the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra, and pianist Dr. Marvin Balaan. • Crooked Creek Baptist Church, ChambersviUe. Service, 11. Sunday school, 10. • Curry Run Church, Route 422 west of Indiana. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:30. • Dayton First Church of God. Service, 10:45. Sermon: "The Kind of Person God Uses," based on 2 Chronicles 16:9. Evening service, 6:30. Anthony Casagrande in concert. • Diamondville United Methodist Church. Service, 9. Sunday school, 10. • Dixonville Wesleyan Methodist Church. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:45. Evening service, 6:30. • East Mahoning Baptist Church. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:45. _r ; L / GRACE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH P|ione: 724-463-8535 at Church & Seventh Streets WORSHIP SCHEDULE 8:00 & 11:00 a.m. Traditional 930 a.m. Contemporary Service It's All About Love Series 8 Sundays 6-7:30 p.m. Oct. 27: "Love Speaks The Truth" Our Mission: To worship God and to love all people by inviting everyone into God's eternal family. Visit us on the web ai www.gr aceinindiana .org • Ebenezer Presbyterian Church, Lewisville. Worship, 11:15. Sunday school, 10. • Elderton Lutheran Parish: > Christ Lutheran Church — Service, 9. Sunday school, 10:15. > Mount Union Lutheran Church — Service, 11. Sunday school, 9:45. • Elderton Presbyterian Church. Service, 10:30. Speaker: the Rev. John Erthein. Sermon: "Rediscoveries." Sunday school, 9:15. A soup and salad luncheon follows the service. • Elderton United Methodist Charge: Sermon: "Between Two Kingdoms." > Cochran's Mill — Worship, 10. Sunday school, 11:15. Youth will meet from 5 to 7 p.m. > Elderton — Worship, 11. Sunday school, 9:45. > Mount Zion, Girty — Worship, 8:45. Sunday school, 10. • Ernest Bible Church. Service, 11. Sermon: "Walking Worthy of God," based on 1 Thessalonians 2:12. Special music: Carl and Louie Benson of Punxyutawney. Sunday school, 9:45. Kids for Christ and youth program, 5:30 p.m. Evening service, 6. Sermon: "How to Stifle Selfishness," based on 1 Corinthians 13:5. • Faith Orthodox Presbyterian Church, 2 miles north of Indiana on old Route 119 near the intersection of Route 110. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:30. Evening service, 6:30. • Faith Temple Church of God in Christ, Indiana. Service, 11. • Ferguson Bible Church, Indiana. Services, 10:50 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sunday school, 10. • First Assembly of God, Indiana. Service, 10. Sunday school, 9. » First Baptist Church, Blairsvilie. Service, 9:45. • First Baptist Church of Glen Campbell. Service, 10. In celebration of the church's 100th anniversary, the church has adopted the theme "Lift High the Cross of Christ ... Into the Next Hundred Years." Sermon: "Reformed and Free Indeed!" based on John 8:31-36. The final draft of the Faith, Vision, Mission and Goals statement will be distributed to the congregation. Sunday school, 9. • First Baptist Church, Indiana. Worship service, 10:30. • First Christian Church (Disci- ples of Christ), Indiana. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:30. • First Church of God, Indiana. Service, 10:30. Sunday school, 9:45. • First Unitarian Universalist Church, Twolick Drive, Indiana. Service, 10:30. Speaker: The Rev. Priscilla Richter. Title: "Weaving — All Souls Service of Remembrance." Religious education, 10:30. • First United Methodist Church, Blairsvilie. Service, 10:45. Consecration Sunday. Guest speaker: the Rev. Duane Slade. A Victory luncheon will follow the service. • First United Methodist Church, Marion Center. Service, 9:30. Sermon: "The Two Commandments. Sunday school, 11. • Full Gospel Assembly of God, TWolick Drive, Indiana. Worship, 10:45, with anointing and prayer for those needing healing. Sunday school, 9:45. Evening service, 7. • Fundamental Baptist Church, Indiana. Service, 10:45. Sunday school, 9:45. Evening service, 6:30. • Gilgal Presbyterian Church, north of Marion Center. Service, 11. Preacher: George Hood. Sunday school, 10. • Gipsy Christian Church. Service, 10:30. Sunday school, 9:30. Bible study, 7 p.m. • Grace United Methodist Church, Indiana. Services, 8,9:30 (contemporary format) and 11. Sermon series: Celebrating Grace. Sermon: "Living in God's Grace." Sunday school, 9:30 and 11. Evening service, 6 (contemporary format). Sermon: "It's All About Love: Love Speaks the Truth." » Graystone Presbyterian Church, Indiana. Services: contemporary, 8:30; traditional, 11. Sunday school, 9:45. • Grove Chapel and Harmony Grove Lutheran parishes: > Grove Chapel — Worship, 11. Sunday school, 9:45. > Harmony Grove — Service, 9. Sunday school, 10:15. • Harvest Church, now meets at the old Omni convention center off old Route 119 south of Indiana. Services, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p:m. • Hebron Evangelical Lutheran Church, Blairsvilie. Services, 8:15 Continued on page 9 FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1455 Church Street, Indiana SERVICE TIMES 9:00 AM Sunday School 10:00 AM Sunday Service (Nursery & Children's Church) 6:00 PM Sunday Home Groups (Call Church for details) 7:00 PM Wednesday Bible Study & Family Programs (Nursery) SENIOR PASTOR: Donald R. HozJep WORSHIP PASTOR: Jams W. Bniaker, Jr. CHILDREN'S PASTOR: Richard J. Clayton 724-349-8180 FAX: 724-349-9449 COME EXPECTING MIRACLES TO HAPPEN IN YQJJB LIFE! PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Proclaiming Fullness of Life In Jesus Christ 64O Church Street, Indiana Phone 724-349-5556 Sunday, October 27 Informal Worship 8:30 a.m. Traditional Worship 1 1 :00 a.m. Sermon "Connecting Through Beauty and Relevance"

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