Independent from Long Beach, California on April 2, 1962 · Page 16
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 16

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Long Beach, California
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Monday, April 2, 1962
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Page 16
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P«g» B-6--INDEPENDENT I HI imt. CII4. MM. AwM t IM1 Faced With Death, H e r L i f e B e g i n s By 1SABELI.E McCAIG GOSHEN. Vt. (UPI-- Four years ago Elsie Mastcrton thought her life had ended. She discovered a lump on her breast. Today, fully recovered "from major surgery for a · malignant cancer, she says the past four years have been the most productive, and perhaps the happiest, of her life. Mrs. Mastcrton, 46, is the mother of three daughters, co-properietor of Blueberry Hill Farm, a ski resort turned summer inn, and a successful author. "When a woman is faced with cancer, she figures her life is over, that she will look and feel terrible," she said in an interview. But being aware of death has made her aware of life. . . . "Of all the things you take for granted. Life becomes more precious." A FORMER* New York secretary who just 11 years ago thought lamb chops and frorcn peas were a culinary production, she opens the third season of her unique cooking sclwxil in the Vermont Hills in May. Meanwhile she's writing a second cookbook. It will be the fourth book for the author-innkeeper, who moved here when her husband. John, gave up practicing law in New York to start a ski resort at Blueberry Hill. The venture failed in the snowlcss winters of 101!) and 1950 and they decided to open their rustic, old farmhouse t o s u m m e r guests. The day Mrs. Mas- tcrson gave birth to their oldest child. Luanda, now 11, Blueberry Hill 1'arm w.is also born. An advertisement boasting of Lucullan fowl and "nothing whatever to do" btought results. WHEN they 'couldn't find a cook, Mrs. Mastcrton took over the kitchen. With the challenge to produce the - sumptuous meals her husband advertised, she soon h^j^in to make the boast a reality. Her secret, she says, is that she still rooks "scared". "It took me five years to learn to cook without a qualm," she admits. But she still worries about every meal "like a mother over a child/In her first book "Noth- ing Whatever To Do," she confides, "I approach each meal with the fear and trepidation of the young bride who is expecting her husband's boss to dinner. I never know for sure that I won't bum the stew." Her cooking school students move right .into the farmhouse for their weekly sessions when Mrs. Mastcr- ton imparts common sense cooking. She warns of the pitfalls she fell into and dispenses imaginative hints such as adding sugar to almost everything, including beef stropanoff, to make it interesting. * * · · AMONG the gourmet de- lights that have made Blueberry Hill famous arc her succulent hot biscuits which she cuts out with a whiskey glass so they will be bite size. A cucumber soup she invented is another. Its elusive flavor is the result of chicken stock made with cucumbers, onions, milk, pepper,' garlic and cinnamon sticks. Blueberries, which grow in abundance on the mountain behind the farmhouse, turn up in preserves, pancakes and sauces. Mrs. Mastcrton's full life has followed her brush with disfiguring cancer and the determination to make the most of every day. Let's Explore Your Mind ·TOED pea CHURCH-GOING 2ING A HIS3AK? AW Wi?£ CIC5-Z IDC-TUSH? V3Q By SYLVANUS AND F.VELYV DUVAI.I. 1. Some people arc born selfish. False, c.xccpt that in one sense, everyone is born selfish. We have to learn to become considerate of others. As we grow up, we find that certain kinds of behavior get us what we want. If, as small children, we find that crying, wheedling and temper tantrums are successful, \vc tend to depend upon these to get what we want all our lives. If We were brought up by parents who did not let us get away with such behavior, we learned to get what we want in different ways. In any case, selfish or unselfish, we are what we arc because of what we h.ivc learned, not because of the way we were born. · · » ·* 2. Does church-going bring a husband and wife closer together? (Afl.tft tffr.ni) Science Shrinks Piles New Way Without Surgery Stops Itch--Relieves Pain Nrw Yorl. !Y. V. (SprrM) For the first time wirnrr hm found * nrw hrallni; mbntanrc with thr dtnmsliine ability to tlirink hemorrhoids. »top itrh- inc. »nd n\\trt p»in - without aurgr-ry. In one hrrnorrhold cine nftrr · nother/Scryitrikins improve, rnrnt" w»» report'' 1 ' » n 'l y rr '- ficil by a doctor's ohrrvation*. I'ain wm rrlirvril promptly. And, whllr R t n t l y r r l i r v i n e pain, actual reduction or rr- trartinn (shrinVinir) took place. And most am*un£ of nil -- thi» improvement was maintained in c.i'es where n doctor's observations were continued over a period of many months! In fact, ri*nlt!i »ere vj thorough that mfTerers were aMe to maVe such astonishing *t.i1e- mrnts as**Piles have eea«cd to he a problem!" And amontt tbe«e nutlerers were a very wn!f variety of hennirrh'iid conditions, tomeof 10 to 'JO years' standing. All this, without the me of narcotics, nne«thrtics or nstrin- pcnts of any kind. The secret is a new healinit MitiM.ince (Ilio- Dyne*) -- t h e d i s c o v e r y of r world-famous rc-iarch in. c titu ti''H. Already, !!io-I»ynn is in wide ire f"r nealinc ininr ti*Miw un nil parts of the In-d This n'*\v l u a l i n c sub'tan^e, isolTert-d in fnfi«fitnrit or "inf. i f t r n f /pr»M raited I'rt futrntinn ] //*. A^k for i n d i v i d u a l l y s» .i!'-d i convenient P n p a r a t i o n II Sup-1 positorif; o r P r e p a r a t i o n I I ! Ointment w i t h special a p p l i - l cntnr. I'irpar.itinn H is fold at all drug counters. , Yes, and not only through the church services themselves. Many churches have a number of activities and groups to which the people can belong as couples-which help bind them together. One important reason for marrying a person who belongs to the same church is that such activities bring you together, rather than pull you apart. This is just one of the factors which result in happy marriages, McGowan-Stuht Betrothal Told Mr. and Mrs. T. Albert McGowan, Lakcwood, announce the engagement of their daughter, Patricia Ann, to William Russell Stuht, son of William N. Stuht, l.akcwood, and the late Mrs. Stuht. A senior at Mayfair High School. Lakcwood, Miss McGowan is a member of the National Honor Society and Mayfair Honor Roll. Her prospective bridegroom also attended Mayfair. The wedding will be an event of Oct. 13. P-T.A. Council Board to Meet Executive Board of Long Beach Council of Parents and Teachers, Inc., will meet Tuesday at 9:M a.m. in rtnti(Hi);lis S c h o o l Audi torium. Mrs. Raymond Still, prcsi dont, will conduct business nu'clinK. A skit concernin Ihc Nation.il and State Parent Teacher Maga/incs will be presented by Ihc department of extension. Alicia Hart Disguise Figure Faults It's a lucky gal who doesn't have a figure problem. The plump gal can slim down with proper diet and exercise, and the too-slim gal can build up some weight. But there are tricks that will create the illusion that you've solved your problem even while you're working on it. If you're too heavy all over, w e a r unobtrusive shades such as navy, black, gray, and beige. Slick to lightweight fabrics t h a t have no sheen. The neckline of your dresses should rw V-shaped or oval, and your suits should have narrow lapels. ' * * * * IF YOUR excess weight is all on top, wear dark tons with lighter skirts and flared skirts in bulky fabrics. The hippy woman can reverse the process, wearing light tops and darker skirls that have only a slight fullness. To draw the eye away from the hips, she should wear p o r t r a i t necklines often, and bulky jewelry. Even the girl who feels she is too tall can minimize her height by wearing large hats with width, straight to m e d i u m - f u l l skirts, hip- length jackets and large handbags. On the other hand, the tiny girl c«n add height by wearing outfits of one color, with vertical triming and narrow self- belts. Small hats, such as toques, also will add height. So, you see, an illusion can be created for all. A Book by Any Of her Name YOUR "FOR RENT 1 signs come down fast when you use Classified. Dial HF. 2-. r 95!). Dy Abigail Van Burcn DEAR READERS: A battery of attorneys advised me to change the title of my new book. MARRIAGE ON THE ROCKS. So I sent an SOS to you for some suggestions, and the response was overwhelming! From Alaska, "Why not ,,,,, call it, 'How Now Thou Vow7" From Brazil, "Marriage In Orbit," from Canada, "Wedlock Deadlock," A Captain in Korea suggested "Betrothed and Betrayed." and from Maine to California came: "Altar Ego." "Double Bedlam," "Marriage Fallout." "How To Succeed in Marriage Without Really Trying." 'The Marriage Mirage," 'The Rise and Fall of M a r r i a g e , " "Stalemate," "Remember the Alimony," (from Texas, natch). "A Funny Thing Happened To Me On My Way to the Lawyers," "Bed and Bored," ·The Trouble With Marriage," and "How to Stay Sane in a Private Institution," And literally thousands of others. Since my book is all about marriage, I have decided to play it straight and call it simply. DEAR ABBY ON MARRIAGE. It will he out in May. You might be disappointed with the title, but you won't be disappointed with the book. And that's a promise! Gratefully yours. ABBY * * * * DEAR ABBY: It was very nice of you to tell that lady not to blame her husband for calling her another woman's name In his sleep. You said, "A man can't be blamed for what he does in his sleep." I disagree with your advice. I would have advised that woman to give her husband a good punch in the eye because "a woman can't be blamed for what SHE docs in HER sleep, either." This works because I have tried it, and my husband has never called me by another woman's name in his sleep again.--"SIXTY" * * · · DEAR ABBY: Last night i felt very blue and depressed. My parents were not home so I telephoned my boy friend, who is taking basic training in Texas. We got carried away in conversation and talked for 35 minutes. When we hung up, I called the operator to find out how much the call cost and she said $23.80. Now, Abby. I am only 15 years old and do not have that kind of money. I am afraid to tell my mother because I know she will be furious. I am terribly sorry for w-hat I did, but that won't help now. Would it be proper for me to ask my boy friend for the money? --TELEPHONE TROUBLES DEAR TROUBLES: Don't ask your boy friend for the money. He has his own troubles. Tell your mother and ask her to take It out of your allowance (If you get one). Otherwise, offer to "work It out" somehow. Your .parents \vere lucky your boy friend wasn't In Korea. And next time, try the pen. * · * » CONFIDENTIALLY TO O. Jj Get it In writing! · « * * Stop worrying. Let Abby help you with that problem. For a personal reply, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Box 33C5, Beverly Hills, Calif. Will Meat Keep? !,.' Cooked meats should be p. used within four days after \' cooking. In the opinion of'. '· home economists. Unlike » j fresh meats, cooked meats! ' should be tightly wrapped i . or covered before storing In ;! the refrigerator. Left-over ;'. poultry should be used with-, ' · in three days and poultry stuffing and gravy within two days. EXTRA MONEY COMES IN FAST when you advertise furniture for sale In Classified -- classification 73. Dial HE 2-5959 to place your ad. STOCK MARKET L E C ' T ' U R E A MtE MctVt "III »· · !»« BJLTS : · limt Md TrM H t»t»!«» Marttt." LKl«r it«rtl (I I:M TM. LONO Jt»CH-WKl.. AKU 4. MlriM HM. fn LOTS! It . _ LQl ANGELES--Tvtt., April 9. P a r K UMT, » M wnttni AM. CRfNiMAW-T»«rt, Awll I. Cwmi»jlt» Center. JlJt SMta RfMIIJ Dr.. LA. REWARD If tht lody.in.Woitin, rtoj. in5 this cd '"ill vii.t thf nt* and · i c i t i n g Mothtrhood Shop j u t t o p t n c d a t 523 Pint Avt., *^» will bt rtwordtd by fctlfig cbl« f a purekatt tht very latttt and ciciting faiMont for 5 p r I n 9 and Eotttr. WOIT CMrtt Accents MO Irllttlt NO Strvict CHJt|ti 3rd PINE LONG BEACH try tills no-fuss langy taste treat zt'.s/v macaroni and cheese Yfin taste n prirrlrss iliflrrrnrc in Stnuflrr's Frnirn 1'rrfxirnl h'omtf J CALIFORNIA f FEDERAL : i SAVINGS - AND LOAN ASSOCIATION GIANTS OP GAIIFOEKIA GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE** NATION'S LARGESTElDERAQSAVINGS 1 lie Colilcn Gate IliiiV, rising "·!( feet above beautiful San Francisco Day ami builKU .1 cost of Si5 million, is America's l.irccst single-span suspension liriili-c. California Federal Savings is tlic nation's Ijrgcst fcilcral savings association, lioth are m.in-m.iilc gi.mts; yet neither was created hy men who ilchlxian-ly set out just to l.uilil gi.mts. Tlic rl«irc w.is to huilil somcthinj; li-llcr, stronger, safer...eminently useful. And it took size to do the job ifcht. Ciliforni.i Federal offers you tlic complete safety of giant si/e: assets of ou-r S730 million, lleservcs arc far aWc lcg.il requirements. The wisdom anil stability of management policies luve been proven in 36 years of lo,ims, \vart and depressions. In addition, California Federal Savings offers jou the unlw.it.ible piotcction of a mighty middle name: I-VJrral. FrJaal ELEVEN CONVENIENT OFTICES TO SERVE YOU means chattered ami fully supervised by tha U.S. Government. FrJcral me.mssavings accounts ate insured under provisions of the Federal Saving* Loan Insurance Corporation. A man and wife, with 2 individual accounts and 1 joint account, can have up to $30,000 in savings fully insured. All accounts cam quarterly dividends at a ·J.fi'S current annual rate. New funds placed by the 10th of any month earn from the 1st. \Vc pay the postage if you save by mail. It costj nothing to give your savings-im rstmcm the advantages of California Federal, giant of California and the nation. Why not have them now. 4.6% CURRENT ANNUAL RATE 4 DIVIDENDS A YEAR · HfJdquJrten Off.ee: 611 Wilthira Blvd.. lo» Angelei 17. C«lif. LAKEWOOD-LONG BEACH OFFICE: 4248 Woodruff Ave. (at Carson), takewood8. HA9-5991 Other Off**. In An.heim. t«to Rock, Echo Park. Ounada Hills. Hollywood. Ingfcwood. lot Anklet. Mind. M.'e, Raocho p.* ,,«,,,, «....., f TM *

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