Independent from Long Beach, California on April 3, 1963 · Page 3
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 3

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Long Beach, California
Issue Date:
Wednesday, April 3, 1963
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Page 3
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^^ 808 WEtS They've Got You by the Numbers There seems to be a rumor going around, Ralph, that I've got something going against the Telephone Trust Matter of fact, 1 like the phone companies. They "pay dividends regularly to widows, orphans and other stockholders. Their executives are conscientious, hard-working, community-building gentlemen. Their employes are cheerful, courteous, well- trained and intensely loyal to their companies. And a phone caD for a dime is a pretty good bargain. '. . I WELLS . The ordy thing 1 object to in the Telephone Trust is its Big Brother attitude toward its patrons. Phone companies are determined to jjve the public what they believe the public needs whether it wants it or not. An example, of course, is the attempt to force I all-digit dialing on a resisting citizenry. Another example.Is the current! campaign by the telephone companies against unlisted phone numbers. In New York, subscribers now have '.to pay an extra 50 cents a month for unlisted sen-ice. Locally, General Telephone and Pacific Ben are pondering such a premium charge to discourage unlisted numbers. - · The phone companies say unlisted numbers cost 40 per cent more to service than listed ones because information operators spend time looking for them. Why on earth would a subscriber want an unlisted number in the first place. The Telephone Trust thinks it, has that one fggered out, too. Status. Unlisted numbers are a status symbol, the phone company says. Nuts. ' Tips for Solicitors More and more subscribers are requesting unlisted numbers because they are being pestered to death by telephone solicitors and salesmen. And who is responsible for the increase in telephone soliciting by utter strangers? To a great extent the telephone companies are. / Both local phone systems, for instance, are pushing street-address directories. These -- sometimes called criss-cross directories--are indexed by street address rather than alphabetically like the regular phone book. Using these directories, solicitors can blanket a given neighborhood -- chosen for geographic proximity, for income level. or for any of a number 'of reasons. There are even potentially more unpleasant sales uses for street address directories. In an ad for its Los Angeles address directory. Pacific Telephone urges its use: to -Contact people who are prospects through emergencies." la other words, if your name and address appear in the newspapers because of some misfortune, here's a chance for an eager beaver with a crisscross directory to make some money off you. In Long Beach, the street-address directories are rented by the phone company for $6.50 a month with a six- month Raiferty's Backers Win Test Bunco Cons Served A local policeman I know got interested in the service. Posing as a telephone solicitor, he called the phone company and asked about the sen-ice. He is a former bunco officer and just for kicks he represented his business as one of the more common bunco cons. You think the phone company told him his business was illegal in Long Beach and showed a reluctance to lease its street address directory to him? No, it couldn't have been more cooperative. My wife called Pacific Telephone and inquired about getting an'nnlisted number to avoid being pestered by solicitors. Oh, no, the phone service rep said -- she couldn't consider changing a number and uniting it for a" trivial reason like that. It appears the Telephone Trust has us craning and going. It peddles street- address directories to solicitors for a nice piece of change, and now its pondering picking op a few more bucks by charging us for the privilege of unlisted sen-ice. What to do? Write the Public Utilities Commission demanding that the phone companies not be allowed to put a subscribers name or cumber in a street address directory without the subscriber's written permission. Study Sought on Using Rail Net for Rapid Transit Setup (Continued from Page A-l) the educational Held, we are opening the door for political [legislature Tuesday for a machinations in other parts!between-session study on how By JIM McCAULEY k r-T Sacrama«« lama SACRAMENTO--A resolution was introduced in the roads now sn-ing the South-itnore. R-Los Alamitos, intro- ot the educational field,** he said. , . - . . . . . , ' Assemblyman Nicholas C. Petris. D-Oakland, said that Rafferty was a controversial figure. To give him the appointment power, _ he sad, would bring this'controversy into the new program. a a" a . a PETRIS said the bill was| designed to help children ''whose parents have so many problems themselves t h a t [they have brought up their 'youngsters in an environment hostile to learning.' They have been brought up in a world where there are many, many walls and very [few doors, very little light," he said. Wmton said the Republicans were objecting to unimportant detail* of the bill. :o develop a multicounty. Southland rapid-transit system. Assemblyman Tom. C Carrefl, D-San Fernando, the land. · a a · BRUCE Sumner, exassem- blymia from Santa Ana, had advanced such a proposal at a meeting of Southland legislators last week. INDEPENOENT-P.-9* A-J Lami ttao. tain.. w«A. *«ri 1. »a Fiml Ancient Town · JERUSALEM. Israeli Se£i tor OB--The remains of a! town linked with the 2,000- RC. period have beea~ua-! duced a resolution paying'covered in the Negeb desert. Lribute to Frank Vessels Sr,]south of Eeersheba, lot Alamitos r a c e t r a c k ! 'j Founder, who died Feb. 20. "The governor the appointment will make upon the author, placed the emphasis on expanding sen-ice on existing railroad trackage. CarreU pointedly did not mention Metropolitan Transit ^Authority, the state agency now charged with rapid- transit development MTA has switched over previous rail- axnmuter sen-ice to bus lines. INSTEAD, his resolution specified that the interim study committee would report by 1965 on "financing and establishing a jurisdictional authority which will implement and coordinate a transportation system." An Assembly interim re-' port to the 1963 session had semce could be inaugurated for a fraction of the cost of constructing a whole new system, its boosters ruled the city of may r e g u l a t e lobbyists. Rapid railroad commuter Assemblyman Thomas had transit say. "These rail facilities are well designed and could be! improved to form the nucleus of an integrated transit system capable of meeting the needs of the entire area," said the Carrell resolution. Carrell declared there had been no detailed cost study requested the opinion. The Senate Rales Committee set a hearing 2 pjn. Physicians Stop Smoking.. ;j PARIS: (Apr. 2) Centre c£ Propasuxfc Antl - T»tae. re-' ( Thursday on a resolution ports: SS.64S heavy smokers (of . which wouM authorize the!»ho«a many are physicians) watchdog commitee on the,have stopped smoking; thanks tidelands to hire consultants. I to » new formula (Pronicotyl) sioh of existing rail famil- · The commitee has questioned|»Mch rcduc« the urje · to wish infor- ahout this new method of breaking the tobacco habit may receive a free Brochure (u Ions u the supply lasts) by the provisions in the Longj« nok '- Those Beach plan for developing ! " tideUndi oil off the Beach shoreline. FIVD WHAT you want on the feasibility of expan- when you want it by reading Classified ads. Turn to Classi- sending their name and »Mrrs5 to Anti-Tobacco Center of 365 Filth Ave, Dcpt. ities. In other Sacramento developments: A s s e m b l y m a n Vincent Thomas, D-San'Pedro, set a hearing April 22 before the fied now. Assembly . Municipal County Government recommendation of Dr. Rafferty because the ram has to work with Rafferty," he said. "I can't see letting a bill as r e c o m m e n d e d a study whether MTA should be re-J placed by a new agency. The Los Angeles metropolitan area and the Southland counties suffer from in- important as this go downjadequate transportation and lack of coordinated the transit CarreU the drain because of one unimportant detail" a a a a MEANWHILE, AssemHy- man Don Mulford, R-Pied- znont. proposed the public be polled on whether it wants _ the legislature to abolish thelmuter sen-ice on the *~v death penalty. [miles of track of three rail The poll would be in «ie facilities,TM said resolution. Carrel] said he worded his resolution to be sure that it includes a study into the possibility of expanding com sen-ice on the 6X and Com 1 mittee on his bill to exempt city taxpayers from paying county health-service taxes U their city already has a mania pal health department Long Beach and Los Angeles tax bills could be lowered if the Thomas biH passes. Assemblyman James Whet- , IE1 NEW LOW RATES 15 e 'i8. 25 C ONE HR. 75' ALL DAY FREE PARK SHOP irlth Validation COYEUO rAUING * HOTECT TOUI CAI rAIK IT - LOCK IT * KO ONE EUE TOUCHES IT ·LINCOLN PARK GARAGE JUST NOITH OF IONS tEACH U8HAIY ENTRANCES: raclfic Ava. at ttf St. lraatf»» attvn* «oft« tei Ctttr ; m m crxn lonn »i:sn'· MPIXT - cacoi 13 rsrais: co. Rwccrc. rf. of an advisory election year. It. wouldn't be binding on the lawmakers. I Mulford said a similar advisory election was held In 1933 on whether state gasoline-tax receipts should be transferred to the General Fund. FIRST RULE for finding lost articles--dial HE 2-5939 to place a far-reaching Classified lost" ad. NOW! Sunday Morning Brunch iniT SHUT KOIXJI: II a.m. la I IB. Idutti JUS Oulfctl uin II) JUS A arlfclan camaaurnaa al artakTau andkjnck. 531S tic. The Day in Sacramento THE CQYf KNOB I SOoetl-- AMIHfix SUM SctlMl LM Urttd tout* »rw lav* cotmnin kilt- Fund; SCA «, Vilt»«i. D-IVinara. j c i l k il SSSa ·. ""KW ··"·« "- 1w "* mnnurn a M « t. »,, ««. ·«.·»««. nut* l» laia Calitanna tar tour ·f tiskDTC. fitmt. ariaiia M aouru SI UT. t41 Passctf: wiHara--tan* Vent aa pnaertv al atttfv aoatf caunTir vtnara aaticnn tfur- tnfl Irttf lilahinc ar Lfctima af spovsa ; OuMrn; At Ci, laglrr. CHI '(lam -- AuHianm tan rial . . _ _ . - _ _ . - . __ ·»*»» ramtnissSo-w t t cancM lanr ------ (SijluB MMnmMi ** n n^art BtefcBt arta fcscrimliii m»aa^J«a Sbrariet._aalto1M "wSftt 1 "^ r * ? """ r '' } ''TM " "* 11 * II Sn Kauri. !·· ers t i e r * of lo«; Buck iSSS^T 1 tor kitlom tntnduc**: ·kcrteti t* aclennrfit MopI**! MAHHI ·· ' atatirvc* «f attar.) awnatrrr; Al .UTl. Mirf-1 Honor hcv**« to OTV *· ·«· tor tack! 1000 midefttl.- Al XtTX DOTOVM, « Clwta v*Ja. ruen lw*r ana wir* ftctniart w »ff-ut« hgror bctitM caoflt;! Aft 717C C«nev.M H Ch.Wr*n-- AwThorir Hanker Elected LOS ANGELES (UPD-- ^tterun ickooi «*»·«* to'jcsse W. Tapp, board chair*^^TM*~n t K$Z\TMn of the Bank of America, wiwir*.'Tuesday was elected presi- jfS3I* "'jdent of the Los Angeles World r lncrfl.nr« tor aU%«4 .ct; Aft TTTV rifle*. xsarniM. 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