The Daily Free Press from Carbondale, Illinois on February 12, 1920 · Page 4
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The Daily Free Press from Carbondale, Illinois · Page 4

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Carbondale, Illinois
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Thursday, February 12, 1920
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Page 4
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THE DAILY FREE PRESS •*&*JL$fe-SS»'' OeepS '. . . • .*f f- ;& * .JP^ _ •' -Ziir-lm- f; : By VICTOR ROUSSEAU A story that grips the imagination and holds the reader spellbound with awe over 'the possibility that the silent and mysterious depths hold just such a horde'of strange crea- tures'as the author has conceived, that might some day rise from the coral- caverns of ; the ocean flooV and overrun the earth. A remarkably thrilling tale that vies with the imaginary fiction of Jules Verne, Rudyard Kipling and H. G. Wells. Don't fail to read it! You'll find the first installment in an early issue of this paper. BEGINS FRIDAY LEAGUE U, S, IS ABSENT lBD3-Abvalimn Sinrnln—1BE5 Keep, it, handy-To prSmVf'ff prompt relief from rheumatic ,: pains_ant) aches? ; •••,< W ! l !-EN..you...AnoOT..what Sloan's . l,inimcnt will do,.'.a3. thousands of ineh. andp'worneVithe .world" over know,':ydu;.tbo/ willkeep'it'hahdy.' You will 'use .it,. for, those .'.'twinges of rheumatii/'', i l 1 9r-":relieyiii'g ; ;'a'at°.laine back, muscle, stiffness: and' soreness; '"•• Caches, laltlsprts of, external pains, and . exppsure;aftermatliB. . ...."-."••" ; ' 'Dnlx'talies a little; applied. imOumt ri»&to»j;;.i " .Soosi'-^netrates, '• scattering.; this-congestion,. bringine merciful -relief T t». the throbbing,, jumping' part •:!.., . -, '— •' ,— ,.,.n \arureist Has ifi!- If fiof, we'd like- to know his: name. :;i ••;"'•.;, h./.: .•'• IME :o-;iii n<\- : Director Dawn Genera! H ines Tlirns Demands and Appeals to President. CHIEFS IN SECRET MEETING INDIAN UNITS FOR U. S. ARMY Council Is Called to Order in London by 'Arthur J. Balfour. DISIPPOINTMEHT IS VOICED Proposal to. Organize One or More Redskin Divisions Pending in Congress. Washington, Feh. 12,—A proposal to organize one or more full divisions of Indian troops as a part of the reorganized army, to he known^as the American Indian division or di- visions, TK perifllnsr In corisrresS' as "part of the army reorganization legislation. Seed Wheat High in Montana. Calgary, Alb., Feb. 12.—Montana farmers are paying $3.25 a bushel for seed wheat in Alberta,' said, to be the highest price for any part of tastj-enr's crop. Between 100.000 and 150,000 bushels of it are being shipped to Montana with large quantities of oats brought here for feed. Washington, Feb. 12.—Theft of the $30,000 pay roll of the AguilaXKl company at Tainpico, Mex., by robbers who killed the messenger carrying the money to the company's refinery, afid wounded-three other men on the street car where the holclun took place was reported \o the state department. The company • is, a. British corporation but has many American stockholders. The robbers escaped into the brush. . American Ambassador Will Not At"••-•tend—Belgium, Brazil, Great Brit" ain, France, Greece, Italy, Japan ^nd Spain Represented. \ • London, Feb. 12.—The council of the I .league of Nations formally'opened its , (--meeting here. Arthur J. BaiCoin-, rep- t' resenting Great Britain, assumed the : olmir on the suggestion of Leon Bour• geois, representative of France. ..In his speech of welcome to the ] .delegates Mr. .Balfour said there was •only one blot on the meeting, and that •was that there were eight nations represented instead of nine.. He-said! that it was-not desirable" to touch on the absence of the United States, but ste referred "to it as marring the-s.vm- . raetry of the original plan of the .league. ...;3i;;Bourgeois, in reply, added a word nf regret that the nations represented -were only eight In number. Balfour Voices Disappointment. "As. I myself was. one of .the plenipotentiaries at' Versailles, I am sure nobody. I am now 'addressing and none' of iny friends in America will think -I am doing wrong in •• expressing- my personal .regreV"that''for .the moment «f all events, we''havei not reached our 'complete njimber,"' said Mr. Balfour in Ws reference to" the lack of Amerl^ can representation in the council at the present, time. •• . .He expressed the opinion that the members of the council wonld be able to do useful work, and that an institution "which carries within itself so naany'promises for'the future may do something toward the 'consummation which ail desire." , The council met in the historic pic- • lure gallery of St. James' palace, which 'was built by Henry VITX. Immediately below his portrait a .large ..table was placed for the accommodation of the members of the council. "The remainder of the gallery was • i apportioned for the 160 invited guests, Including all the ambassadors and ministers of the nliied, associated and neutral powers, other distinguished public men and the press. ' The nations represented at the meet-. Ing were Belgium. Brnx.ll, Great Brit- din, France, Greece, Italy, Japan and Snain. Won't Be' Told to Attend. Washington', Feh. 32.—^mbassaflor Davis at London will not b-a 1 instructed to- attend the meetings of tiie allied premiers and the, council of the League ' .of Nations,- it was said at the state department. ' These meetings have^ been transferred from Paris and will be held in lxmdon until settlement of the exact •tfttus of Switzerland in Its relation to the league maltes- it possible again to conBlder_GeDevfl.jiaA More Loaves Valier's Enterprise Flour does mate snore loaves per. Back. One trial will convince you. Milled from'carefully selected rich-in-gluten. Lard winter wheat .this flour has a'Strength. \vhich insures greater volume in baking.' This is a decided economy. Valier's Enterprise Flour not only means "more loaves per sack" but it assures bread.which is enjoyed down to the last fiavory crumb. Of course, such flour costs 'slightly, mote in the sack but its use ie'economical in the long 'run. Home baked bread is not only the most nutritious of all foods but it means a decided saving. ' : " Order .Valier's Enterprise Flour from your grocer today. Remember there a»e More loaves per sack "Community" it Valuer's tish-grade- popular priced . flour. U baa mode hosts ot friends. Attorney ' General Palmer Called Into Conference Before Statement Was Issued—No Action Contem- .'. plated by Department. Washington, Feb. , 12.—President Wilson has again been called upon to settle the wage demands- of. the railroad brotherhoods,' and to -banish, if possible, the specter of a nation-wide strike of more than.'2,000,odo men. The entire controversy was put up to the-.,White House after Walker D. Hinesr director general of railroads,', had finally rejected the .demands of the brotherhoods, and thereby ended the negotiations, which he had carried on with their representatives for many weeks. . Director General liines, at the conclusion of a lengthy conference with members of his staff, announced'he had been unatile to reach an agreer ment with the union officials, and would place their claims and proposals along with his own before the president for decision. Text of Statement. He issued the following statement: ."Since-February 3 the director general has had frequent conferences with the chief executives of the railroad labor organizations for the purpose of devising means for disposing of the pending claims for wage increases. During, these conferences -the executives of the l.ibor organizations have expressed their views with great.ability and-'frankness. "The'-director general lias not been able to agree with them as to how the ( .problem should be disposed of in view " of the early termination .of federal control, and is now laying, before the president the representations of the executives of the organizations and also his own report for the purpose of obtaining die 1 president's decision in the premises. "In any event, the conferences have been decidedly helpful in bringing out a clearer development as to the real issues involved, and as to the character of evidence pertinent to those Issues, and the discussion throughout has been characterized by courtesy as well as candor and with a sincere purpose on, the part of &11- to try to find a solution." .Union.Leaders Confer. • . The union leaders called a conference immediately after receiving Mr. Hines' rejection of .their demands. They remained closeted for an hour and a half and dispersed without calling in Director General Hines. ,. No tiiue ; for a further conference was set by the union chiefs and it was intimated that no ndciitio-nal communication woufcl be : sent to the director general. Director General Hines conferred at length with Attorney General PalmcT before issuing his sratemeur. : Mr/ Palmer refused to discuss .the conference .further, than to say he hud -been made acquainted \vltli vhe*pvob- lem 1'ncpil by the director general. He denied Hie .department of .justice was contemplMtintx. act ion. , LAURA E. SWARTZ O8TEOPATK1C PHYlklCtAH Chronic D;*ea*er « •pccfairv Offlc* In Laud«r-Nlchc!« Bltffl. w. w. HAMILTON Coal and Ice MACKEY COAL OFFICE • .Phon* 204 ECONOMY GOAL YARD J. B. WOODS, fKOf. r W«»h«d Nut, Egg and Luim • >- .Phone J48K, HENRY BAIN ''.'; TRAMPER GET OUR PRICES Phone 342 K H. O.'HALL & CO. FEED; COAL AND POUUTRV SUPPLIES Phorifr233 W. A. JEIRANDON, M. D. GENERAL PRACTICE. AND TH« i .'-• --'-•• -- EYE . Eyai Te«t«d Glauct Pltto* Virginia Bld B . Curbondale, lit, DR. J.W. BARROW NEW HAMILTON BUILDINQ H«ur* f to It A. M. and 2 to • P. B .. PHONE S8 F.L.LI]NGLE ? M;D. -.Qcniral Practice . 8p*«lal attention to Eye. Ear, Md Throat QlaaaM FltUd Phonet: Residence 330-2, Office Virginia HAMILTON & BRADLEY Attorney* at Law Phone 282 K ; Suite 112118 New Hamilton Bull*7it| DELIA CALOWEiJL, M. D. McANALLY BIMLDING. 211 West Main Street Dffloe Houre— « to lu A.M.; 2 to 4 P.m. CARBONDALE CANDY KITCHEN Home Made Candles and Ice Gr*a<ti Telephone 144 Y AMERICAN 1 SAVES 5 JAPANESE Soldiers; Captured, by- the ^Partisan Troops Are Returned With Warn- ' ing to Jap. Ccitimander. • Vladivostok. Feb. 12.—Frailer Hunt, Chicago. Tribune correspondent, who lias returned from 'tm extended trip through the ..hill country north of 'here, was •-accompanied by five Japanese soldier prisoners whom he says he saved from execution at the hands of the partisan .troops'. Hunt, delivered the : soldiers to the • American commander .here, who in turn handed them, over to the Japanese authorities with a nbte.> from, the commander 'which said:••'• ''.:,•' .. : • ':"At the .village otDogolovskaka, on January 18,"- there livas 'delivered into the hands of Correspondent Hunt-five Japanese prisoners -to be' delivered; to the American commander:' ••Please. 1 in- WATCH THE KG 4 •Stoznach-Kidiieys-Bfeart- Liver Keep the vital organs healthy by Tegularly takiitig the world's stand-" ard remedy for kidney, liver, bladder and urie acid -troubles— GOLD MEDAL The NitioMii' 0 benigay of Holland for centuries and endorsed by Queen: Wilhcl- mina. At . all. druggists, three sizes. Look forth. Bam..GoU MMkl o»..Tcrr Urn , aadiacceplaa'iiaiutiea. : mCHMElSPILIJS mm* e. commander that 15 the event of a repetition of aets of repression, atrocity and ridicule, of our •war prisoners, we in. turn will be forced; to .the' recourse of ^repressive measures." .' ' ' ' FAMINE THREATENS JAMAICA Falling Exchange Rate Causes Suspension of Trade ill Food on •the Island.' Kingston, Jamaica, Febr 12.—Th& falling excliange - rate with America threatens to cause a famine here. The/ Chinese wholesale .merchants held a : meeting and decided that this weok ' they 'would supply- no goods to- the I Chinese retailers, who. conduct priic- ', tioiliy all the sliops that retail ''food, i as the wholesalers' are losing heavily-j on the trade. .' ' ; BIQiSTRIKE IN MILAN, ,'TALYij il Workers in Chemical Plants Number-^ ing 200,000 Ask More Pay j and Vacation. • •• I Milan, Feb. 12.—Two hundred thou- • sand men. employed uv chemical fac-t i tortes,...including 60,000 ••workmen inJ- "* pharmaceutical plantar went on strike"for higher wages and a week's annual • • '

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