Independent from Long Beach, California on February 25, 1969 · Page 19
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 19

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Tuesday, February 25, 1969
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OS-INDEPENDENT (AM) L?»3 Bretn. Cji'L, Int., frf. I. i'* PRES5.TELEGRAM |PM) DAVE LEWIS Sporti Editor There's l\ 7 o Panic. Yet in Baseball Dispule Hl'ITlNG' T H E HIGH SPOTS: One thing to remember regarding the pension dispute between the major league baseball players and owners is that the contract . dale for reporting is March 1, not whatever lime in l-'eb- ! · rnary the clubs actually have them report. " l e b n i n t y training is considered voluntary. 'Ihat's · why there has been no real panic, on cither side because ; it ims been felt that the trouble will be ironed out by ' -die firs!. ; Even it t h e players hold off reporting u n t i l mid- March, ihcy still will have plenty of time 10 get in shape. Three weeks is enough. A f t e r all, it isn't until the last few days of t h e training season that the regulars pl.iy a whole game. Up to then, the managers are looking it new players. Phi! Iselin. president of the. New York Jets, has ome up with the statement of the year to dale. '. lie says that his club's victory over Baltimore in the Super Bowl has thrown such a new complexion on the AFL-NFL. re-alignment meeting in Palm Springs , starting March 17 that "we just might have to change the shape of the table." f Baseball's secret settlement with Gen. William Eck' crt after he was relieved as commissioner is reported to . : be $20,000 annually for 12 years. This was done for tax purposes as well as to give . the ex-commissioner pension credit for those 12 years. The new head man in baseball -- Bowie Kuhn -not only has an unusual name, but one w i t h a distinctive pronunciation. The 42-year-old New York lawyer's first name is pronounced "boo-wee" and the last name "cue-en." His great grandfather was Gov. Bowie of Maryland nnd for whom t h a t slate's leading race track was · named. * * * IN THE FIRST TWO WEEKS after Chuck Barnes took over O. J. Simpson's financial affairs, he received 2-11 requests for the Heisman Trophy winner to make appearances. Some of them were for ns much as $2,000 a day. i Latest windfall for O.J. is a contract negotiated by Barnes with Chevrolet. Ironically, when he was a kid in San Francisco O.J. ; tried out for a junior football team sponsored by a Bay City Chevrolet dealer. And he didn't make the club. Tom Woodeshick of the Philadelphia Eagles, commenting on his club's season, "we lost 11 games in a row and then our season took a turn for the worse. We won two games -- and lost O.J. Simpson." While in San Diego recently, we learned that Cmdr. Lloyd Bucher of the Pueblo grew up in Father Flanagan's famed Boys Town in Nebraska. He also played tackle on the institution's football team. Oakland quarterback Daryle Lamonica didn't know the Raiders had changed football coaches until he showed up at LaCosla week before last for the Astrojet golf tournament. Daryle had been on a hunting trip into the wild country of Mexico and hadn't heard John Rauch had quit to take the Buffalo post and that Bud Madden had moved up to the head spot, "That's fine with me," he said. "Bud and I have been very close since I was traded to the Raiders." * * * CASS1US CLAY, PERTURBED over being eliminated in the computer heavyweight championship tournament last year in which Rocky Marciano was declared the winner, has demanded and received an electronic match with Marciano. Clay settled his ?I million law suit against Woron! er Productions for one dollar in return for the electronic match with Marciano. The affair, which will be telecast nationally in the near future, will net Clay a good chunk of money. Stop-action film taken from the fights by Cassius and Rocky will be used. Clay claims he was included in the heavyweight tournament without his knowledge or permission and mat ins image was hurt when Jim Jeffries was awarded the decision over him. Snh ta r the u r S t , com P uter match, Clay knocked out Max bcnmelmg, but then was eliminated by Jeffries '· Olson w?n 8 r inh f !? U " d ' m braing cirdes is tllat Bobo . Olson will fight Floyd Patterson in Sweden kite I his - spring. The AI -year-old former middleweight kino is in ; desperate need of a good payday. g O'Malley Worried About Strikes (or Lack of Them) By FRED CLAIKF. Staff Writer VI;KO BI-.ACH, i-'ia. -- LKkij;cr president Walter O'Malley says the player strike is in capable hands. He's concerned, however, about the guys who throw strikes for the Dodgers. "I t h i n k we should keep t m r mouths shut on the player strike itself," said O'Malley. "There arc skillful men negotiating for carh side. "1 am tremendously concerned about nur own club. I notice A t l a n t a has four of its starting pitchers in camp. The Dodgers are without any." D(id;;er starters Don DrysdalK, Claude Osteen, Bill Singer and Don Sutton are among the club's 12 unsigned players. "This is a highly com- p e I i i i v e .spurt," said O'Malley. "It's lough to face a pitching staff which has had the proper training. "And it's been proven that pitchers who don't have the proper training gel off to poor starts. 11 takes awhile for them to be ready. Three of the 12 pitchers on the Dodger roster who are. in camp got tagged Monday--by m a n a p e r Walter Alston. Joe Mocllcr. Pete M i k - kclscn and John Duffi' 1 each were fined §10(1 Monday for violating the midnight curfew. The trio was kept out of Monday's workout but will return to the drills today. "We have a few simple rules and one is that play- ers have to I"' in their rooms by midnight," said Alston. "The longer 1 thought about it (the curfew violation by the three pitchers) the madder 1 got. It's a disappointing thing to me. I hate to see young players get off on the wrong foot." "Manager Alston has our full support on UIP fines." said director of personnel Al Campanis. "It was no substantial amount but the money will not be given back. "This is a time when many of the young players have a chance to show what they can do. 1 would think these players would want to take advantage of that opportunity." "It may have been a case of the players testing our rules," said O'Malley. "And they found out the answer." The tone of the Dodger camp is one of serious business. "This is a very importanl year for the Dodgers," said O'Malley. "It's no fun being in this game unless you improve your standing. We owe ii to the fans to come back with a good year." DODGER NOTES: Willit OivH. In* filv velrran starter in camp, ts dvr foi m occasional day oil durlno wiw training. "Willie reported In Good conrji lion," said Alston. "II doesn'l lake I'i'n lono to eel ready. After we've worked out (or a lew days Willie can lane *« occasional day oft to olay coll oi go fisting. It's a long soring training." . . . A few of Hie Dodgers are being asked o lo,e _ wclaht, that Is. Ihose who will nave to shfd a few pounds are Dltctiers Dulllc (533). MiUkelsen (2J!l. Art Darwin 1204), Infieldcrs Bill SudXiis 12011 and Oaiy Moore (70S) and outfielder " UCLA'S UNANIMOUS STREAK CONTINUES Combined News Services Time is quickly running out for the frustrated field of challengers trying to overtake mighty UCLA in thn race for honors as the nation's top-ranked major college basketball team. The powerful Bruins, unbeaten in 22 games. Mi,,-,. day were a unanimous selection for the No. 1 position in the United Press International and Associated Pn-s-, ratings for the 12th successive week. There was some fluctuating below the Bruins, how ever. Santa Clara, after losing a double overtime den .sion to San Jose Stale, slipped to third in Ihe Ul'l poll and fourth in the AP listing. Twice-beaten North Carolina icgainccl ihe Nu :; spot while UiSallc moved i n t o third in Ihe AP nilm-. and f o u r t h in the UPI rankings. Willie Crawford (2131 . . . "and Red Patterson (Dodger PR m ' . . man) loo. . cliioped In O'Mllley . . . Willie Davis is Imoressed by the teaching technioue of new Dodger batting instructor Dixie Walker. "He really knows his stulf and lie goes about It In a nice way." says Willie. "He'll come up and offer a lew suggestions and then say to try It for a (ew days. He knows what It's all about." . . . The Dodgers art ilated to Dlay their first squad game Sunday. Associated I'rcss (Writers) UCLA KC. lim . . ... . North Carolina ?!·?) La S*:lc (!MI Santa Clara (2M) . . . Daviho:l (22-2) Kentucky (19-31 St. John's N.Y. (203) . Soutn Carolina (19-3) Purdue llJI Duouesne (163) Louisville (17-31 villanova (1M .. ._ Kansas II9-JI Ohio State (IS-il Illinois OW) New Mexico State (21-3) . Tennessee (I6J) Mnrquette (19-4) - Tutsa (18-S) .... . Boston Cotleoe (1S-3) United Prrss lntcrnaiinn.il (Coaches) lit, . 215 174 ...IDS . ..103 USallf C2MI . . Davidson C'?2) Kentucky 119-3) . Purdue I It'll ..... St. John's ll.Y. (20-31 .. villanoni H9-J) ..... Uuaucsne (17-3) ............ Louisville (17-3) . South Carolina (19-31 . No// Mexico State (21-3 Kansas (19-4) ........ ,, . Ohio Stale (15-5) . . Wvoining (16-8) ....... Drake (19-!) ............ _ notion College (18-3) _ New Mexico (16 3 ------ Tulsn (18-5) -------------Illinois (H-J) _______ ..... Oaks Fall 3rd Time to Dallas Combined News Services John Beasley scored -12 points and Ron Boone 03 Monday night to help Dallas become the first team to clcfeal Western Division leading Oakland three times this year, 128-117, on the Chapparals' home court. Beasley's effort fell just one point shy of a club ABA Standings Eastern Division Won Loll Miami 32 25 Minnesota - 31 27 Kentucky 28 27 Indiana . 31 32 New York 14 40 Western Division Oakland 45 12 Denver 34 24 New Orleans . 30 29 Dallas 27 29 Stars . -.T M 33 Houston 18 33 Monday's Results Dallas 128, Oakland 117 Miami 123. Houston 114 (Ontv oames scheduled.! Games Tonlohi Oakland at New York. New Orleans al Denver. Miami at Denver. (Onlv names scheduled.) PC). .561 .534 .509 .192 .286 .789 .536 .503 .452 .421 .321 Behind l'/3 3 15'/7 ir/i 17W 26'.'! record. Oakland was led by Warren Armstrong, who liad 26 points. Willie Murrell flipped in 24 points to pace six Floridians in double figures as Miami stopped Houston 128-114 on the losers' hardwood. Oakland Wot Bradds Harcjc Armstro Brown Eaklns F'etersn Dallas G F T 3 1-1 /Powell 4 4-4 12J.Beasly 6 0-0 1? Smith 10 6-6 26 Combs 4 13-1321 Boone 5 (5-8 lC.Beastv 0 0 - 0 0 Leaks 4 1 - 1 9 Lochmn f, 0-0 12 1 0-0 2 4331-35 117 Totals 6 F' T 6 34 15 17 8-9 42 2 1-2 5 5 1-2 13 12 9-1133 Clawson Critctifld . - - - Tolals 43 31-35 117 Totals 4? 23-36 US Oakland 29 38 31 tt-117 Dallas _ - - 3 29 33 33--123 Thrfe-Dolnts coals--Combs 2. Foulsd out- -Oakland, Moc, Logan. Total fouls--Oakland 32, Dallas 29. A--2,304. Miami C F T Sidle 5 8-1? 13 Houston G F T Keller 0 0 - 0 0 Becker 7 3-3 I/ Snarks 3 1-2 1 John'n 10 00 21 Thrnlon 1 .1-3 5 Jckwi J J-2 Preenin 5 8-12 70 Carlos Krmr Rhine Swagtv that ho 1M1AGGI0 ADMTTTED-n. LoCosla rcce.Hlv that he uas surprised Ted Williams look thr job O f manager of ll,e Washington Senators Pap-!' h?5fi. *""' " W ' 1Cn ' «* » w il '" *' DiMag says he has no intention of ever managinc ^Tlie.vll never get me in that kind of a spol," lie de- Hunter b 5-12 17 Tliorcn 3 1-2 7 McHtlv f 3-5 IS Murrell 11 2-3 ?J Anrinrsn 4 7-9 15 Totals 4533-60 )23 Miami Houston . "Miree Mint goals--Johnson. I ou'cd out HoyOon, Becker. lul.il touli--Miami 23, Houston 7 3) 71 74 M Bill Mazeroski says the big difference in baseball and golf for him is "I find myself thinking negatively in golf. I know I can hit a baseball and I go up to" the plate confident. But when 1 stand over a putt, I find myself thinking there is so many ways to miss it and only one way to make il." When you make your baseball selections for the 1969 pennant races and come to the New York Yankees, remember that their team balling average last season was the lowest in history for the "Bombers." Since the 1930 team with its Murderers' Row batted .319, the Yankee average has steadily gone do\vn until it hit bottom last season, .214. The 1906 Chicago White Sox, known as the " I l i i - tes Wonders." batted more than the "CS Yanks, recording -A .228 i cam average. COLLEGES FAR WEST WsihMiglofi (A, Sfanlorff iS Nfv^'Ja -- Las Vr:ga% 57, No-lixirn A- lio«9 76. w^Oiinnfon SI. Ji4, r.a:ifo*-ni^ i-^ M0"»aiia St. 87. Goniaga 66' Idaho 75, A\o»len4 6i. MIDWE5T '.'.isiourl 66, Kaiiai Slate 67. Kansas 83, Oklahoma 53 Micfiloan 83, Minnesota /?. Nebraska 89, Colorado 6S. Ohio U. 87, Horlhern HNno:-, W. BffAlIng Green 103, Chicooo Lo/oia n. Eastern Mknigan 9], KeiiiutKy Stale ). Heidelberg 76, BluHton 65. Central State (Ohio) 75. Deface 47 St. Benedict'* (Kan.) 103, JO'TI F. Km- nc-d"/ 60. WMhtvirn (Kan.) 70, Eaitc'i Hcv/ Mexico 60. SOUTH Gcorola 95, MISSlSSiDOl Stale W). Tennessee 87, f-SU 63. Kt5rilucJ'V 108, Alabama 79. dermon 9?, Vtrolnlfl 90. Vfrpln'a Tech 79, Tulane K,. Tampa 72, Florida Southern 68. Georgia Southern 87, Vdld'jsia Siiii- M. PiMmonl 9J, Shorter 76. Trrfiu/ivanld 76, MidfjiA Icnnessec 6) .i^cksonviCc 9A, Stetson 86. Auburn 67, Grorpia Tcci 85. Msslsblnni 79, Florida 78. .'njuMir-rtili?.'n 86, RowlO Slrtlc 8-!. I inniflr Toch *?J, Ark^itsfli Slfl!? 7! fA'.-t rt-nrtrascc Stfltr 94, Ai«ttn Pr^v ?s (ovcrlimr). Gramhimg 77. Jarl- 3 o- Strjl* It, Akorn AW 137. Southern iLa.l if, EAST Vll!anov« f. ?avirr (Ohio) 15. .M. Bo'iavC"tijre 97, Scton Hail 79. UhiOh 7/. Rider 66. Cdincpin-Ale'lon 93, V/avneshuro '/g Chevncv St^tc 76. Mount St. MarvTi to. Queens ( N Y ) 95, Aejc'olii 91 (over 'Vermont 3?. Mifidlsburv JA. KIH«S Point 92, Brooklyn CoHeoe !1- lfopprv Rock 73, St. Vmccnl's 5J Grove CMy 98, Edinboro 86. lona 81, Siena 86. Philadelphia T-*Hlr A3, Akron M. SOUTHWEST Tt*«i-EI P«o83, Seattle 82. F'rin American 100, Cornui Chri-,ti W. Raiii Keeps Prep Under Wraps Again High school baseball, washed under by Monday's storm, will try again today to open its season, bul chances of success appear slim. All six Moore League learns and St. Anthony had games postponed from Monday u n t i l today. Cont i n u i n g rains, however, left l i t t l e hope of the games being played. If skies clear, 3:15 p.m. contests arc in order with St. Anthony at. Millikan, l..ymvood al. Lakewood, Wilson at Redondo Beach, Jordan at Montebello and Rnscmead at El Runcho. A pair of track meets. W.irron at Jordan and Marina at. Wilson, are also poing lo t r y and beat the rain. Braving snow storms, skiers from 13 n a t i o n s arc checking in at Squaw Valley for Thursday's opening of the World Cup races. More than 130 skiers are due in the Sierra that are now covered with more than 30 feet of snow. Spider Sabich, Bruce Kidd and Ricke Chaffee figure to be the outstanding competitors for the United States. Sabich is 12th in World Cup standings. * =.= :!* f t' CALVIN G R I F F I T H , president of the Minnesota Twins, predicted that "things are going to get worse" for the big name players that don't report lo his camp. I've talked to a number of players, and they're just, going to sit this thing out. If we don't get the money out of radio and TV the salaries will have to go down by as much as SO per cent." Griffith said. ·;-· * * * THERE was l i t t l e joy at. Yonkers for track officials when they discovered a daily double overpa5 r ment of $67,320 Monday. A mechanical calculator went out of whack and paid $26.80 when the payoff should have been 518. * * * * MANCHESTER' United, before 61.000 fans, scored a 6-2 victory over Birmingham City in the Cougars Tighten Grip on Second: Stanford Bows Associated Press WASHINGTON State tightened its hold on second place in the Pacific-S basketball conference and finished its home schedule Monday with an S4-66 win over the California Bears. Cougars' center, Ted Wierman and Lennie Allen, both from Yakima, Wash., led WSU scoring efforts with 22 and 18 points, respectively. The Washington Huskies scored seven successive points to break open a l i g h t game and go on In down Stanford 68--15. The Indians never led as ilioy dropped Ihcir eighth conference game in 11 stans. It was Washing- ion's sixth conference t r i u m p h in 11 contests. fifth-round of the English Soccer Cup Monday night. Manchester United plays Wednesday in Ihc first round of Ihe quurlcrfinals. AMBROSE Palmer, manager of World Featherweight boxing champ Johnny Famechon, said Monday that the pair are parting company after eight years. Palmer, who took Famechon from a three-round preliminary fighter to world champion said, "Johnny has decided to manage himself and 1 wish him every success." X: * ~ * * KID GAVILAN, former Welterweight champion, will undergo eye surgery lo remove cataracts that are blocking his vision. * * * * GARY PLAYER of South Africa said Monday t h a t he is considering playing less in his country to devote more time to the richer American Tournaments. Appearances in three tournaments in Johannes- burgh have earned him only $4,872. * * * * FORMER Oakland Athletic Vice President Bill Cutler, was signed by the Montreal Expos as a full time scout in Central California. Cutler, before joining Oakland, was executive assistant to Hie president of the American League. Bullets Stretch Leadto4 J A United Press International If il. isn't one Bullet, il's another. Monday night was Kevin Loughery's turn as ho paced Baltimore to a hard-earned 123-119 victory over Detroit to move the NBA Eastern Division leaders ,4'/4 games ahead of idle Philadelphia. Earl Monroe contributed 23 points and Ray Scott 22 in Baltimore's fourth successive win and 49th NBA Standings FANFARE KINGS- Baltimore Philadelphia New York Boston ..... Cincinnati Detroit ,, Milwaukee Eastern Division Won Lost Pet. Behind . « 17 .742 . 4 4 21 .677 4V2 . "...__ 4.1 2-1 .647 39 26 .600 32 .5)5 .12 .362 -15 .31! 31 2A 21 9Vj 15 2-1 21 laker) Atlanta 5a» Francisco San Dleao Chicago Seattle Pliocnlx 2« .12 W .-I/I 2S jS .62* 27 .10 .403 25 -1.1 ..165 U 53 .207 ry 49ers Ti to Play No. 2 Monday'! Result) ' t . (Only game* scheduled.) Games Toniqlil San Dlcqo 3! Milwaukee Phoenix vs. Bcslon at Hew YmK Atlanta ,il New York Seal He al Lakers Philfldelohia at UiionnaH Clilcago a\ San Frdtictito (Only aam« scheduled.) of the campaign. Wall Bellamy had 20 points as Ihe Pistons slipped closer to last place Milwaukee. Chicago got identical point totals of 29 from Clem liaskins and Bob Boozer as the Bulls dropped San Francisco 119-108. The Warriors had a 105-104 load with 4:34 left when Haskins and Boozer led a 15-3 o u l - hursi. Warrior Rudy La- Kusso was game high man CIT-2" IJ2LA.G-TJE wilh 34 p° ints - O Stanford G F i MrFlwn f ,13 10 P.Hincr 2 0 2 -I Grfln A ,U 11 O'Nrill 1 2-4 -1 Drulnr 0 0-1 0 Kchnhkr 0 00 o Croon n 0-0 f) CMJorn 0 0 0 n Gois 0 0 0 0 V/ahingion G F Irvmc (· 01 WoolXk 0 S-A Shu! 111 hy iviin l o u r limes in t h e Uisl. week. Ihc Cal Stale Uin.c Beach hascbnll team tries again to play game No. 2 of its season Ihis afternoon at UC Riverside. The 49ers failed Monday in an attempt to makeup a clotihleheader with Pep- pcrdinc that had been first postponed Saturday. Cal Slate coach Bob Wucst- hofl M o n d a y d i d nul know when the I win bill would be made up. Wuesllioff did ask thai all Cal Stale alumni interested in playing in Saturday's I p.m. game al Blair Held, give him n call al Ihe college. A no-host parly for alumni, wives and friends, is scheduled for the Merry Monk Pizza Parlor, 5630 E. Pacific Coast Highway. San Francisco G n T G r i' .vs W URus;o " a 5-1 lo Lee i 1-1 11 llwind n 7-10 29 Allies 7 .|J I! frtullins I 2-2 Klna J J-3 it Ellis 1 00 ? Turner Nwmsrk Love Weiss C lemons Tolals Chicago . . . . -. .. -. -- san Francisco ..._. ....... Jl 21 JJ 1!-"B Fouled out-- San Francisco. Ellh. Total fouls-- cnicaoo 28, San Francisco V. A-1,942. D4L Draocrics 43. Toucliablcs 43. Stil'wcll (DU 17. Mixed Breed 53, USCG 54. Greco (USCG) 24. Biofldv/ell Suoolvs 39. PMT 32. Oisal- vo ( 8 5 ) 13. Douyldi Jels 48, Robinbon Cafe 45. Hall (DJ) 16. The Snorts 53, Flight Tost 42. McDonald ( T S ) IS. VA Hosoitsi -15, 1st Naiurene 43. Dark (VA) 16. QranaeiiMna 42, Vets Park 39. Cowman 10) 17. Wilson Ford 62, Pcians - ? J7. YoKcn IP) 15. UAW Local 1« 65. R*v'5 Conslruution 63. Ramba (UAW) 11. Bio John's 48, Hiteiid-.vV.s 4-1. Oict) ( \ i ) GAMES TONIGHT At jcttcrson: 7:15--Misiits vi. pii,in- hr,'.: 8 : 1 * -- C A A A riiurdi v s . Tide; 9:15-Rcd Hots vs. Gsntcl.imacd.nc. At Jordan: 7:15--Aoale Reds v s . SCMA; 8:l:'i--Press Telegram vs. LB Javcces; 9:15--Penney! vs. San Pedro At Poly: 7:15--Roicman Construction vs. flir Annrx; 6:15--Mann Can-.lrurtion vs. YMCA -1; ?:15-007 vs. Dcamon Oca con?. At Million: /:15 -Hu?tlr!r« vi. Los ftlaniilos Youth Center; 8:lS~Am. v.'iioicsale mrctv/nro VF.. 53 Construe- ·»·* 1U lion; 9:15--MjntfiMlo JC v* Lo-, Al.imi- 5-8 19 ins Rosvnonr JC'S. (Comimied from Page ( M i \vith i!nu p o i n t . It put n* f o u r t h all alone." Kelly grinned, "you hm! to he proud of Iheni . . . t h r t h i r d piimr in MHT** n i g h t s ami to persist like they porsisU'd, il;iym^ uphill, il wus a t r e m e n - dous effort." BLUE LINES: Thr BoMon Bam--- i»ni star'I trying lo reclaim Ihflr LaM ni/i sion icfiti when Bobby orr and Phil £*· posito return to Hie lineup against HIR Kings at Hie Forum Wednesday "Wi! Orr hasn't played since hurling a ^npr- In a 7-5 win over the Klnos In the Forum last Jan. 30. Lsooslto was susnend^.d during last week's losses to Plllsb'jrti!i (3-0) and New York (9-0) after Dushin? reterffe Bob Sloan. The NHL's loadinq scorer l eight oolrils away from a record 100. . . . In inter-divlslon Dlav, Ihe West has won J6, the East 110, with 23 ties and 32 games, remainlno. That's 3'.6 per cent. It was 34 oer cent last seosin . . . The Kings are 9-20-1 agdinst if.c Erjst, 31.7 per cenl . . . Oakland i^ un- bcntcn (5-0-2) in its last seven games 3tK.lr.St the East, 13-14-3 overall . . . AftomJaY's oame was delayed lor ilve minutes in the first certod while official', rcfiaured the Dlavino time after the timer iL-t the clock run on a whistle. Minnesota . . . . o i o-i Kings 0 0 1 - 1 FIRST PERIOD No scorlno. Penalties-- LoRos? (M) I:!/; Pcl-i ( K ) , B:U3; Mcnard ( K ) , 11:24. SECOND PERIOD 1. Minnesota, Grant 76 (O'Slw. P"'1 In), 19:54. Penalties--Reid (.V.), doubk tiitn:«. 6M?; Lemlcux IK), double mino". A:*'; ColLin |K), 15:20. THIRD PERIOD 2. Kings. Mcnard S C-Vh.*- 1' Hu«h"s); 15:51. On MimlatiO M» On Dcstflrdint ( K ) Rcf.--llrtrns. ,ftll.- Nevada*Las Vega? Upsets Lumberjack? F 1. A G S T A !·' F, Arix. (UPI)--The U n i v e r s i t y of Nevada of Las Vegas out- scorud Northern Arizona University 31-20 in the closing 10 minutes for an 87-76 basketball win Monday night. It was the only loss "f the season on the home court for Ihe Lumberjacks who close the season w i t h a IG-8 record. The win put the Rebels at 1H-5. 15 4 6 .11 2 1-1 5 1 7 1 1 9 2 4..t a 9 3-1 21 Detroit Disclioor Hairslon Bellamy Miles Bing Komlvcs MLmorc Gambec Moore H a O F T 1? 1-3 2i Marin 4 2-4 lOScoll 9 2-4 20 Unseld t i-7 21 Loughrv 9 5-10 23 Ellis 3 4-4 10 Barnhiil 2 0 0 4 Manning 0 0 - 0 0 Monroe 3 0-0 6 m o t e O F T 5 44 14 8 0-3 22 9 1-7 19 12 7-9 31 3 2-2 ' 2 00 . 1 0-0 2 3 7-9 23 Lakewood Basketball Douglas Sliowo'fs 49. Manio'i Piua 31. V.'alcliC !OS) 20. Parks TexdU) 51. Old Red -li. Oakci ( P T ) 23. Sliel! Oil 35, Leir Svsloni 3-1. Accordi (I.S) 13. CUSTOM tAlLORING ALTERATIONS TUX RENTALS 122 E. 3rd Sr. , HE 7-4406 tun PJHKIHO «enoti^Ki iTRtrt Totals SO 19-32 119 Totals 43 27-39 123 Delrotl 28 32 23 34--119 Baltimore 33 34 3S 31--113 Fouled oul--Bellamy. Total fouls--Detroit 23,Baltimore 23. A -5,877. * * * NBA Scoring G FG FT Pll. Avo. ll.rra, S.D. . ..M '68 «1 1937 2».3 Ruic, Seattle 63 657 339 1653 3-1.3 Moore?, Bull. . K 641 36» 1MB 714 RoBrrUon, ClO. .63 }Z 533 162! 25.7 Cunt,!.,,!.. Phils. 65 S31 -i« 1608 2:.7 Oavlor, Laftcrs 62 613 341 15i» 24.3 Goodrich. Phn». 61 573 103 IS" 23.1 V.'ilkcu-,, Scrilllc 68 573 .155 1501 27.1 Grccr, Pllilii. 65 Ml 329 U!3 23.8 Rina. Drtroil 62 560 3^0 MM 23.9 iMIL G A PIS. .16 . r A 92 . 42 41 83 35 J6 81 . . . 23 55 78 32 40 " " " .Pacific-8 Standings $ D K n . . l n , ( 1613-2S45 . Kianonia City 83, AMUclcs In Action a-din -Simmons 122, W, Tf-is it. us. ·k * * Leading Scorers SI -Bob Lanlnr (St. Bondvcnlurr.l. 3S-Ujn is:el (KentucVv). 7?-- Hate Arcftlbflld (Tcxni-EI P Ton l.ittic (Scdltlo). 7,7-- Al Muncss (Mlnnovota). 75 - Rudy Ininlcinovlch (Wir.lng-i fi-ni pnnljiig (Xovlrr). 71-- Howard Porkr (Villdnuvo) WaMn'aton St ' ' Wasmnglon 6 .ofJfciiar/a? U5C ^ ... - S Orpgon Slale -1 S aiilornia J res -n .. . 3 Stanford .. . 3 Monday's Rciuili Wellington 68, MflrifotcJ .li- W-ishlnolon St. S-i. C.al W. Only oanici schcdui^cJ. Friday's Schedule USC at C.-.l UCLA at Stanford. Wdiilncjlon »l O'Cpo't. W L 10 0 8 3 W U 2J 0 15 8 13 10 12 10 10 I? 12 10 11 II / 15 Fouled oul--Nonfi. Tolal fouls--Stanford 1?. Washington 1?. AtlcndancfN-4,000. CALIFORNIA WASH. O F T While 2 1-1 S Allan C. Jhsn .S 9-13 19 Erlkson .S 2-? 13 Proslcv 7 6-10 JO Wierman 9 4-5 " Lovedav I 02 2 Frls ' " n i rtn if f, 4-S 16 Ho99 0 0-2 0 Gomez 0 00 0 Elliot! 1 0-0 2 Snillcv ) 0-0 2Mrdim 0 00 0 Ellis K Ion hoc r Duwr Ahrlihl Hiifdson Coonrr Tol.ilv ?3:o-3,l« To I,-ill u;,C «l SlanlO"). afternoon. III'.I.A ,it r.ii. Washiii'jicn 51. a* Offjnn. W.iihlnvtnn ,il Oirynn SI. California Washington State . . . touied oul-v/nilr, Prcslev, Rilgic. col; Wirrrman. WSU. lnl.ll fouls-Calilnrnia T,, WSU 2.1. AtlrndniKC--5,275. . . . . . . . . . _ _ ...... Mlklla. CM. - . JEM Bcllvoau, Won Yvan Cournover, W.on. Alex Dclvccchio, Dct Rod Bcrcnson, St. L. . . R en Hodqc, Bos orm U!ln3n, Tor LONG BEACH 1629 ton? HfKh BKH. LAKEWOOD 5344 Chuif AVP ANtNEIM 1644 W. Lincoln l/l-l) BUENAPARK 6940 Slsnto.i Ave. ' / M l CAPISTRANO BEACH 33990 Doheny Pk Complete Lint of PASSENGER RADIAL YOU CAN TRUST YOUR TRANSMISSION TO ANY OF AAMCO'S 550 CENTERS. IVOm.D'5 LX.flGKT TRANSMISSION SPCCMISTS COMPION 8M S tone Bf.iU; R!»:| !v./·!.',; DOWNEY Roscmns ,t! I it".'...r.ii !i ; l-5IM(l GARDENA MI60 Crnnslw.v ;i?/2;?.l GARDEN GROVE 3H1 G,]*.i fif HI. (/U) f.38-8200 HUNIING10NPARK 6025 Pacific Avc. US-B58 INGtEWOOD ·1306 Centuiy Blvil. (./.1-2480 ORANGE 807 W. Chapnui (7M) 630-4112 SANTA ANA 929 [. First St. ' (7M) M7-9431 TORRANCE 1520 P.icilir C0d-:l H*v WHITTIER l?7Ui t. Whillifi Blvd. 698-81/·! More than 172,500 service station men across the country recommend AAMCO

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