Independent from Long Beach, California on March 11, 1966 · Page 6
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 6

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Location:
Long Beach, California
Issue Date:
Friday, March 11, 1966
Page:
Page 6
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De Gaulle Repulsed by Erhard (UPI) -- Chancellor LudWig Erhard r e j e c t e d Thursday F r e n c h President Charles de Gaulle's attempt to unravel the NATO military alliance. Erhard's strongly worded statement, a spokesman said, was handed to French Ambassador, Francois Seydoux de Cldusonne ' Thursday afternoon^ only 24 hours after Do Gaulle's own letter announc- ing^hls 1 intentions on NATO wa's^glven the German ambassador in Paris. De CJaulle's two-page note was,. .handwritten, diplomatic sources said, and Erhard replied in kind. Hi «3 , exchanges between" the two governments are.^xpected to follow. gdgml made.no attempt to m « c n President Johnson's time of four hours between rej|ipt of a De Gaulle letter anihis rejection. But Er- haS^"swift; answer left no doftbjjof the unwavering Ger- majgjjtitude, .shared with the Urtrted States, towards French attempts to undo such mili- tarWintegration as NATO has majia'glsd to achieve in the pa|rjj'6 years. ftfi his letter to Erhard, as in hijs earlier note to Johnson, a German spokesman said, De Gaulle contended military integration is no longer rieces- sarj!' He said he would, however? remain faithful to the Western Alliance. ·* * * * ERHARD replied that, for Germany, military integration in peacetime remains absolutely necessary. Only peacetime integration of military commands and forces, he said can assure a believable deterrent to potential Soviet aggression. The chancellor warned pub liclj.-two weeks ago'ihat he woirtttunot tolerate attempts to ''limit integration to Ger man forces and other military units stationed in Germany Thflgwould amount to placing Germany in a second-clas condition, and was unaccept able,-he said. --AP Wlnpbolo A POINT AFTER PARLEY Former West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer points to photographers as he and'French President Charles de Gaulle pose for them outside Elysee Palace in Paris at end of parley. Icy-Nerved Pilot Rescues Buddy in Red Hornets' Nest DA. NANn. Sniilh Vietlhero's deaths a short tlmeithey iust stopped what they cmi, m, Htr. II, "He tried to land with his'pilot-of-the-m o n t h awar'd. " ;ear down and I heard Maj.j I n f o r m e d of her bus- : isher shout, 'Snatch youqband's heroism at her home gear up!' He did and the plancjin Maho, Mrs. Realla Johnson^ Nam (UPI)--Maj. B . e r n a r d r ish'er, a cool-headed father f five boys, flew Into the middle of a raging battle to a tiny, Communist-controlled anding strip Thursday and plucked his downed wingman 'rom the hands .of astounded Viet Reds only 20 feet away, One of his fellow pilots fly- ng desperate tree - top level strafing runs to protect the rescue called Fisher's action 'the bravest thing I have ever seen a pilot do." Maj. Stafford W. Myers ol Mewport, Wash., who hac crash-landed his flame-enveloped fighter moments before zig-zagged t h r o u g h heavy small-arms fire with pursuing Communists virtually on his icels and tumbled into the cockpit. · FISHER CALMLY gunnet the A1E Skyraider--battefe but still flyable--through al most point-blank .SOrcalibe machine gun fire and tool off to safety. ·· Green-bereted defenders o the Ashau Special Force camp--some of whom diec ater when overrun by the verwhelming force of North /ietnamesa regulars--rushed rom their foxholes to cheer 'isher's act of bravery. For Fisher, a curly-haired lative of Kuna, Idaho, icrlbe'd by friends as a steel- nerved man who likes to rids f 0 harks, it was his s e c o n d irush with death in less than 24 hours. Wednesday night he led a supply flight through shrouded mountains aeleagued S p e c i a l Forces camp. Clouds dropped to 100 r eet and conditions were so dangerous all members of the light were volunteers. Capts. Dennis B. 28, of Kellogg, Idaho, John Lucas, 28, of Steuben ville, Ohio, made repeated strafing runs over the and watched M y e r s sprint from a ditch in the middle of Lhe Communist force where he had sought temporary refuge. "It was the bravest thing I have ever seen a pilot do," said Hague. "I think the Viet Reds were so amazed that INDEPENDENT-- P«q» A-7 skidded to a halt on the short Fisher gasped and said: "I told him I didn't want , I him to come bacx a nero, out He said Fisher made one just [Q get the work done and come home." v. VOX FENDER GUITAftS AMPS M M A * . A GILMORE MUSK ^l, 7 ;- HE 7-7469 : MONEY TIGHT? For extra ' cas'h, sell unneeded househol ! items via Classified Ads. Dia ' HE 2-5959 nowl Varying School-Lunch Price Planned (Continued from Page A-l) ng less than $1,000 a year per family member. Board members have pro- :ested that the,federal subsidy is used for a blanket cutting of lunch prices in the school districts, helping the wealthy family as much as it does the poor. They also have objected that the funds are not concentrated in areas which need them most. Dr. Daniel A. Collins, Negro aoard member, criticized the plan as "inadequate." Addec iollins: "It might not be worth lunch to upset people who are looking for a rea son to be upset anyway-' However Collins did not vote against the proposal. * * " * * THE PROGRAM advanced by Ronald Cox, state associ ate superintendent, also the support of Max Rafferty state superintendent. How ever, Mrs. Seymour Mathie sen. Republican board mem her recently reappointed by Gov. Edmund G. Brown, voted [gainst detailing guidelines or reduced-price luncheons. Gov. Brown two months ago asked the state board to ook Into the matter, criticiz- ng school-lunch conditions in he Watts area. Several board members joined the criticism, citing a shortage of school caferteries in Watts and other impoverished sections of the Los Angeles school district. They also objected that there were no special lunch-price concessions made in the areas. Bob Barnes, food service director for the school dis trict, told the board Thursday that there is no appreciable difference in the percentage of schools with cafeterias in impoverished districts and in other areas of the city. He added that the planned con struction of new schools In the poverty areas would hel solve the problem. Los Angeles rejects th federal subsidies, and Barne explained it would be costl or the school district to meet federal nutrition stand- rds. Among those protesting the ntlpoverty lunch plan were ri« San Jose Unified School District and the California Association of Food Service lupervisors. * * * * IN ANOTHER action, the oard asked President Johnson to restore a proposed cul of 55% in funds given schoo districts with large concentra- :ions of military facilities : rom which the districts receive no taxes. Cox, the associate superin tendent, told the board that :he fund slash would cos California's school distric $40 million next year. Lonj Beach stands to lose a majo share of its $1,1 million an nual allotment. Other nearbj districts, including Los An geles, would be similar!; affected. The board also re-clecte Thomas Braden of Oceariside a candidate for lieutenan overnor, as its president Villiam Norris of Pasadena as named vice president. Garden Grove Man Killed in Truck Crash A Garden Grove man was iilled instantly at 5:15 p.m. Thursday when his pickup truck struck a divider and overturned, pinning him underneath. Police identified the dead man as Carl Leo Graham, 38, of 12652 Lucille Ave. A passenger, Walter C. Ineich, 47, of 7183 Olive Ave., Long Beach, was thrown from the vehicle, but escaped serious injury. Police Sgt. Mike Sianez said the t r u c k apparently swerved out of control on M a g n o l i a Street north of Trask Avenue, hit a center roadway divider, bounced off it, hit the divider again and rolled over, crushing Graham. .»*» i f '~TM fa- ivero doing and watched it." more sweep and came barrel HAGUE SAID Myers, also ing in behind Myers. "If there was any guy who and only, a year and could have pulled it off, Fish- away from retirement, took a er was it." snid Hague. while strafing C o m in u n is FELLOW PILOTS al Home troops attacking the Specia where Fisher was stationed! before coming here last July,I Fire broke out and smoke Rather than chance the near- stationed with the. by rain forest, he guided the 319th Fighter-1 n t e r c e p tor crippled ship to the air strip. 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