Independent from Long Beach, California on April 2, 1963 · Page 2
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 2

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Long Beach, California
Issue Date:
Tuesday, April 2, 1963
Page:
Page 2
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P*3» A-J--4NDEPENDENT rr-L.A.C. SAYSr When You Have Half the Truth : There is an old saying that "when you know hall the truth it is the other half that is important" It is the fear that they are being told only half the truth about Cuba, nuclear testing and economic factors that is]destroying the confidence of many people in their government It is the reason for the hearings in Washington where the Defense Department was questioned about its press secretary's statements that it is all right to lie to the American people--if that department considers it a security safeguar± * * * All this is a part of what is being criticized as ·'managed news." It is a part of the administration record of holding up information of the Russian mis- siks buildup until 10 days before last year's election-although there had been public estimates of it by non-government sources for weeks. There was the President's brother's carefully worded interview in which he said: There was no US. air coverage promised for the Cuban invasion"--when it was well known the coverage was promised using planes owned by the invading force which was called off by the President after the invaders had landed. : At a hearing before a congressional committee the spokesmen for news media organizations criticized the administration's managed news policies. It was demanded that there be a repudiation of the theory that the government can lie to the public. Another spokesman charged that "in its efforts to deceive actual or potential foreign adversaries the government has also de_ceived the American people." j . ' * * * * Newspapers are often charged with sensationalism and inaccuracies. Presidential News Secretary Salinger has charged this to newspapers. That charge nay be valid. But the safeguard is that the competition among newspapers, radio and television coverage is sa great each media is a watchdog over the coverage of the others. The reporter and columnists are competitive, which means it is virtually impossible to suppress available news. But public officials can--and do--use news releases to cover up blunders or policies they are not willing to entrust to public opinion. * Another witness told the congressional committee thjat "the government had no right to lie to the public Ii{ any situation short of all-out war--unless national security is vitally involved." He said the Kennedy administration went beyond these limits in the Cuban crisis. "It is one thing for a government official to say "no comment' to a question," he continued. "It is quite different to deliberately answer with a lie. It is equally reprehensible to deliberately mislead the public by telling only a part of the truth." \ * * £ This has been a problem with many administrators regardless of party- But it has been carried to a greater extreme by the Kennedy administration than any of its predecessors. It no doubt feels it is in the best interests of the country--and in many cases honestly overlooks the importance of what it may consider minor factors. But it treads on dangerous gjound. Once the public becomes fearful that it is being given only part of the truth--or deliberate untruths -^confidence in government will be destroyed. j When that happens, the door is opened to our enemies who thrive on distortion and a breakdown in the morale of the people of a country they seek to conquer. The American people have proven they can stand up under bad news when it is honestly given tJjein. But their greatest fear is that they will be deprived of the truth by well-meaning public officials who do not trust the people's courage or intelligence. Or when withholding of news is used to cover up bunders or new programs the people may not favor. · -- LA.C. J (t_A£/» column, by t, A. Coffin Sr, tl» eff.er columns. Is ·* t»- £TC3*ca c$ penor.af eplruoi end don not eectsisrHy reflect tft ccn- t2»r» j c^Inica cf tH'i PEOPLE IN THE NEWS Yukon Survivor Loses Her Toes Minister Seeks Probe * /· TV -m r^f * ^~v n fi · Fubfitheil daify except Sunday *t of Bomb Blast in OffrceB.aa.^aS Tnm wirt hrtkn Surgeons M o n d a y removed all the toes from the right foot of Helen Klaben, 2!-year-old Brooklyn gill who survived with her pilot for seven weeks after their plane crashed in the frozen wilderness of the YuVon. The attractive Miss KU- ben came through the operation in good shape at C o l u m b i a Presbyterian Medical Center in New York where she is expected to remain several weeks. The hour-long operation was necessitated' because gangrene had infected her frozen foot. PAROLED Strip teaser Candy Barr, who once strolled the stage clad mostly in two cap pistols and a cowboy hat, Monday was paroled from state prison at Huntsville. Tex, in a s o m b e r b l a c k outfit befitting her new role as scripture quottr a n d choir singer. T h e r e h a v e been reports that she has been urged to become an evangelist. Prison officials gave her $5 spending money and $5.70 bus fare to Edna. Ter, where she win live with her parents. Later, the 23-year-old baby-faced exotic dancer hopes to join her husband, Jack SaKiHati, ia Los Angeles. --Aaocnttd Pre» wircahoto BEWILDERED Maria Elena Jijon, 5, of Quito, Ecuador, sits on steps in Boston, Mass, wondering why she can't see her parents. They were killed in a hotel fire there last week. At the time of the tragedy, Maria was In a Boston hospital for treatment of a dislocated hip. The one-time girl friend of West Coast mobster Mickey Cohen was arrested in Dallas in 1953. She had marijuana hidden in her bra. Candy slipped out of Goree women's unit at the state prison virtually unnoticed. She had asked prison officials to keep her release a secret to avoid publicity. REAPPEARS Actress JiuK- The Bodj) McDonald whose · disappearance from a psychiatric clinic touched off a two- day police hunt. Monday mght visited a night club in Sydney, Australia, to watch a fellow American. Miss McDonald went to Australia for a three-week night club engagement at a reported $3,000 a weeV but was forced to cancel the engagement. Monday night, she listened to American singer Frances Faye in the Chevon Hilton's semi-night club. She said she will returt to the United States today. Miss McDonald arrived in Austrilia March 2 and had been in most of the time since then. She was admitted to the Rozelle Psychiatric Center Saturday and disappeared at 1:15 a m. Sunday wearing only a blue nylon negligee over her hospital gown. She was found Sunday night u n h a r m e d in her apartment. DIRT Caroline Kennedy, the President's daughter, will be asked to dig up a little dirt in Washington. Tenacious Catherine' O'Connor, of Asa Arbor, Mich-, is determined to complete her 50-state collection of soil samples, and now she's going after the District of Columbia, too. She will write a letter to Caroline asking for a tablespoon of D.C. soil. ii/CKr "I must be very lucky," said 9-year-old Becky Dufford of Eric; Pa., "1 was c u r e d o f cancer and I m e t t h e President." T h a t ' s w h a t t h e A m e r lean Cancer Society's 1963 poster g i r l told her par- BECKY ents w h e n she left the White House Monday. And, she bad not only met Frtsldent Kennedy, but took away his autograph To E-cty from her friend. Kennedy" and i few presidential gifts as welt GOP Candidate Fights Birth Control Program control aid to married women living with their husbands. Maremont says this would kfll the program. CHICAGO C$» -- Iffinois'nold Maremont, issued a PcnSlOnCl'S MttU tarted a birth-control assist-lstatement describing the suitl _ -. _. ance program for women on as "the irresponsible, last- (jCl A 10 IrldSSCS elief Monday in a drive to straw approach of an ineffee- cut welfare costs, and inline- tual headline-hunter who diately ran into a court suit y Chicago's R e p u b l i c a n mayoral candidate. The plan makes informa- ion, medicine and contraceptives available to mothers on the relief rolls, married or unmarried. It was attacked by Benjamin Adamowski, GOP con:ender in today's mayoral subversion of knows he is on his way to a dismal defeat.** · · · * THE BIRTH - CONTROL program has been opposed election, as state policy. ADAMOWSKI, who is seek- ng to block Democratic klayor Richard Daley's third :enn bid, said in his Superior ;ourt suit that the birth-control plan runs contrary to public policy based on preservation and strengthening of the family unit The suit charged that 83 per cent of the women who are paid funds for offspring under the $150 million-a-year program for aid to dependent children are unmarried. The court made no indication how quickly it would act The chairman of the Illinois Public Aid Commission, Ar-i lie Church leaders, have taken a strong stand which is reflected in bills now pending in the State Legislature. The proposal in the legislature which seems to have best support would limit the birth WITHOUT COST The tame thorough, sincere eye fT3m?nittco (with g i l l i e s fitted to their · ejes) is now to pnctiollj ill pensioners OAS without cost to chiefly on moral grounds. Op- *h"^. Come in ind bring your ponents, led by Roman Catho- identifiaifon card and we wil contact youi socil worker, m relieve you of ill the details. DR. MILTON GLJNBERG Optometrist -- It Pine Are. HeutaeU B i d e , Downstiin Phone HTmlodk 6-2113 30 Vein of Experience INDEPENDENT I dairy except SondJy t _ENCL\0 (UP1)--A ministernight at the association's of- sald Monday he would ask fice. Installation of officers for an investigation by the.was held at another kcation'cirrjei state attorney general into'and the building was empty the bombing of an office of,at the time of the explosion, the American Association of United Nations. The Rev. Brooks Walker, Unitarian Church minister, took over as t h e organization's president Sunday night frccn actress Marsha Hunt. *A homemade pipe bomb Wasted out windows and ·*», started a small fire Sunday!!^ . . t, Calif. Adjudicated t y Si- r ceiiver/ New Shinola* ('Once.a-Week" |hoe shine lasts Kays sus $27.00 t7S 62 WAYS BETTER THAN EVER ... plus all the regular Scenicrulser Servke feature like sir conditioning, air-suspension ride, pancramk picture windows and fully equipped restroon. It's a yours al no extra cost Enjoy exclusive Greyhoun Scenicruiser Service'... AND LEAVE THE DRIVING TO US. No ether lora c putlc tra.i$pcrU'.cn Kss Urts so b». For example: Riw Tirt Ckicat* ·· St. Uiis . Mital ... On* WOT I ...IM5-IJJ4I ...5UI- IMS ...5J.T5- II.7S ...U.IJ-W.JS On* «·» tsurtd Tr» Kcw Or!mi ..SI.15- 1I.IS KIMH City ..4J45- IMS Mieinioni ..Sill. IJ.JS 0»la 4J.I5- TI.JJ NEW LOW RATES 15 e i8. 25 t ONE HR. ALL DAY FltEE IMBK A SHOP trlth Validation COYHED fA WIN 5 * flOTICT YOUI CAS fAU IT . IOCX IT * NO ONI USE TOUCHES ft ·LINCOLN PARR GARAGP JUST NOITH OF IONS KACH UIRAlT : EHTUHCil: ridfic »·«. M M St. tniArfr tetwtn Ttdtt ta4 Cttfv , for Easter WOMEN'S BEAUTIFUL LACEY TRICOT SLIPS Fexraninlty-p3us slips ia COD- n=i acetate tricot lavished with lovely lace. \Vhite. 34 to' 40." 229 LACE-LOVELY NYLON HALF SLIPS Lace trimmed cyfcn tricot EHHg| pettistpj. Assorted styles. oVTi \\tte. S-M-L · BRIEFS WITH FANCY TRIMS Acetate tricots fancied with Lice or embroidered nylon appljqoe and lac*. \\Tiite or jiti. Sizes 5 to 8. PRETTY TRICOT BRIEFS Elastic-edge or bond-leg style fa soft, easy-wish acttate tricot. BotH ia V tie or p'nV. Sizes 5 to 10. 111 LOIS IUCHEIVO. H E I - l i t l 1SK 1I03T nil TOUT BEUTUT BRAS MADE TO FIT AND FLATTER £how-off 6-Way Bra. FlaibTe cadcrwire, foam-padded tops. \MiiSe d black z^lco bi- cot timaxd with £ae beg. Sizes 32-43, A-B-C ccps. Cotton Era. Stitched cr ccctocr cop stjfa. White. .Sizes 32-42, ia A-B ccpi foo CROSS-FRONT GIRDLE AND PANTY GIRDLE nobcd fcrvct Tff t u^uii 1 1 ' **, h tf Ijctmca 9 top sad bottxa^saa Idex back ' * taalirstjlet. \\lSte. Sizes S-M L-XL, " YOURMONFfS WORTH MOKE AT WOOLWORTH'S AJrertiseJ ilims attSUllt et most TTcolirortl) jtont

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