Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana on March 17, 1988 · Page 17
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Logansport Pharos-Tribune from Logansport, Indiana · Page 17

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Thursday, March 17, 1988
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Pharos-Tribune, Logansport, Indiana, Thursday, March 17, 1988 Page 17 On Television THURSDAY 1 IIUIlOL/rr 1 © ISna TIKI TV LM.ng Group. Inc ft Worm. TX (B® B O e 0 am o 3) O CD 0) (B IB IS 9 5PM (:05) M'ster Dif. Strokes 5:30 (:35) L S S Happy Days 6PM (:05) Alice Fact of Life 6:30 (:35) Brnett 3's Company (4:30) Col, B'ball NCAA Champs: 1st Round (L) News Newlywed G.I. Joe Love Connect M'AVH Jem People's Ct. Big Valley Star Trek Sesame Street OucMales News Win, Lose Superior Ct. Double Dare WKRP News People's Ct, News News Fact of Life ABC News CBS News WKRP News Crazy Like a Fox Family Ties Survival Wld Happnin' Now News News News Crieers Bus Rpt Happy Days NBC News CBS News ABC News 7PM M'A'S'H (:05) Andy 7:30 (:35) Snlord A-Team 8PM Cosby March 17 8:30 Di)'r»nt Wld 9PM Cheers 9:30 Night Court 10PM 10:30 L.A. Law (:05) Magnificent Seven Mov: Girls ol Ihe White Orchid Col. B'ball NCAA Champs: 1st Round (L) ET Jeopardy! Cheers CBS News Win, Lose Wheel Barney Hollywood Sq Remington Steele Family Ties Cheers MacWeil/ Lefirer NewsHour Family Ties Curr. Aflair 3's Company Jeopardy! 3's Company Wheel Newlywed Wheel Probe 48 Hours News Col. B'ball Hotel Simon and Simon Buck James Knots Landing Mov: Quiet Man 48 Hours Hell Town Simon and Simon 700 Club Mov: Ghost Story Chicago Nile Alfred Hitchcock Hour Knots Landing Strght Tlk Bob Newhart Mystery! Mov: Butlerlield a Cosby Dif'rent Wld 48 Hours Probe Crieers Night Court Simon and Simon Hotel News Outdrs Taxi (:45) Mystery! Curr. Affair L.A. Law Knots Landing Buck James ft^jt jft PRIME- ME£kJR Top Ten Pr ^tUSrMr r^*\ l~e( ^^^•^^^^^^^ j. t.y — n M^HMI flME TV ograms larch 6,1988 BaMBHIHHIBIHHH ^jjjBf^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BJtJiHf^EltJtl^fflilUOlM 1. Cosby Show 2, Day By Day Special 3. Cheers 4. Night Court (R) 5. Orownng Hams 6L Who's the Boss 7. Gokten Girts (R) a Grammy Awards 9. eOlflnutes 10. AN 31.4 28.1 25.9 24.5 23.7 22.0 21.5 21.1 21.0 20.5 48 43 39 37 34 33 36 33 35 32 NBC NBC NBC ABC ABC NBC CBS CBS NBC NBC Continues To Dominate Ratines Singers Can Be Bothersome To Bands Dear Ann Landers: Many people register their gripes with you, and I'm sure it helps them feel better. More than that, it lets others know that what they are doing may be annoying as the devil. Here's mine: I have been a part of a dance band for several years. I love my work, but our biggest problem is people who come up and say, "Would you mind if 1 did a few numbers with you? I'm a singer." The situation is often embarrassing because more often than not the person can't sing. We try to be tactful and say, "We really should rehearse together first," or "We may not be able to do the song in the key that is right for you," but they make real pests of themselves, especially if they've had a drink and get encouragement from friends or relatives. The absolute worst scene of all is when a mother or dad brings up a child and says, "Will you please give this kid a break? All he (or she) needs is a chance." Last week we had three of those. When polite refusals don't work, I've been tempted to say, "Would you ask a doctor if he would let you assist him with an operation or an undertaker if you could help him Ann Landers with the embalming?" Please, Ann Landers, do all of us in the business a favor and print this letter. I've never seen the problem in your column before, and it's a real headache. - SOUR NOTE IN WISCONSIN DEAR SOUR NOTE: Here's your letter, with a grace note from me. A simple solution would be to ask the would-be performer, "Do you have a union card?" Dear Ann Landers: My 36-year- old divorced daughter and her children spent the holidays with me. During their visit, 1 learned some not-so-surprising news. My daughter admitted to me that for 20 years she has carried a torch for her high school sweetheart, I was extremely fond of that young man and had hoped with all my heart that they would marry. When they broke up I wept. "A" and "D" have not seen each other for 15 years. Both have had unhappy marriages. I believe it was because they should have married each other. "D" told me that she had written "A" several letters in the last five years, laying her cards on the table. He did not reply. A member of his family acknowledged his intention to respond and gave me the definite impression that he still cared for her. What can my daughter do to get this man to communicate? I am certain that nothing short of a direct and honest answer will resolve this problem. - A MOTHER IN S. CAROLINA DEAR MOTHER: His failure to respond is in itself an answer. The literal translation is, "No interest.' Dear Ann Landers: If my 21- year-old daughter takes my car without my permission (after I have told her that she may not have it), would the law consider it a theft if I reported it missing? - MOTHER IN INDIANA DEAR MOTHER: Probably. But there has got to be a better solution than that. Dear Ann Landers: My husband (married 18 years) called me last night and said he had to work late and I shouldn't expect him home until after midnight. When he arrived at I a.m. he had two hickeys on his neck and scratches on his back. What would you think? -- RESERVING JUDGMENT IN NEW YORK DEAR RESERVING: I'd think the same as you. Drugs are everywhere. They're easy to get, easy to use and ewn easier to get hooked on. If you have questions about drugs and drug use, Ann Landers' newly revised booklet, "The Lowdown on Dope," will give you the answers. Send $2.50 plus a self-addressed, stamped No. 10 envelope (39 cents postage) to Ann Landers, P.O. Box 11562, Chicago, 111. 60611-0562. NEW YORK (AP) — NBC's "Aaron's Way" made it into the top 10 in the A.C. Nielsen Co. ratings as the television season winds down and the networks begin giving spring tryouts to potential series. Last week's ratings were skewed by pre-emptions for college basketball and the Rev. Billy Graham's televised fundraising, but NBC still won, taking the top five places. With only five weeks left, ABC is holding onto second place in the season-long ratings race, thanks to high ratings for its Winter Olympics coverage. NBC won the week that ended Sunday with an average, prime-time rating of 15.9. CBS had a 12.7 and ABC 11.8. The season-to-date averages are NBC 16.3, ABC 14.0 and CBS 13.6. To make up the 0.4 point it lags behind ABC, CBS would have to beat ABC by two points each of the remaining five weeks of the season, an unlikely prospect. CBS, however, has rebounded in news ratings." For the week that ended Friday, the "CBS Evening News" had an average Gentle Soap, Moisturizer Help Dry Skin Q: In the winter and spring, I find that my skin itches and is dry. This happens on my legs and arms. I know it is not serious but it is terribly annoying. What can be done about it? A; Low humidity and low moisture in the air, inside and outside, is responsible for the annoying dryness of the skin. In the Health Letter published by the New York University Medical Center, some simple suggestions are made for just such a condition. Avoid long, hot showers and baths (with or without bath oil). They seem to draw oil from the skin. Use gentle, non-drying soaps such as those made of glycerine and those that contain moisturizer. Apply moisturizer after a shower while the skin is still damp to seal in as much moisture as possible; the most effective moisturizer is petroleum jelly, followed by creams and lotions. Protect children's facial skin with Drs. Lester L. Coleman & Steven Andrew Davis petroleum jelly to prevent windburn. Wear lace mufflers and leg warmers as an extra layer of protection against the cold. Use a humidifier to replace the moisture that is dissipated in heated indoor air; an ultrasonic model is preferable. Be sure to clean the humidifier to prevent the buildup of bacteria or molds in the water tank, If the condition persists and becomes distressing, seek the advice of a skin specialist or dermatologist. — L.C. * * * Q: I have been told that doctors know in advance which women have the highest risk for getting can:er of the cervix. Is this true? Could you tell me what the risk factors are? A: Over the last few decades, many research studies have been able to identify disease and lifestyle factors which increase a woman's risk for getting cancer of the cervix, that knob-shaped portion of the uterus that protrudes from the back of the vaginal vault. Studies have shown that cancer of the cervix is correlated with sexual activity. It has been shown repeatedly to be more common among women who are sexually active at an early age and have multiple sex partners. Authorities generally note that women in their teenage years who have early or frequent sexual activity are at increased risk for cervical cancer. Infections with certain viruses, including herpe.s simplex, also have a positive correlation with cancer of the cervix. The risk is also increased in women who were exposed to diethylstiibestrol — DBS — while in their mother's womb. Fortunately, the safe, easy and relatively inexpensive pap smear can spot abnormal cervical changes before they become cancer. When used to screen even young, sexually active women, pap smears can help contribute to the drop in cervical cancer. — S.D. Drs. Coleman and Davis welcome questions from readers. Please write to them in care of this newspaper. Watch Out For Counterfeit Products DEAR FRIENDS: I recently bought a purse that I later learned was counterfeit! I want to share some of the information I came across in dealing with this problem. What counterfeit means is that the product has an "unauthorized representation of a manufacturer's trademark" or trade name. It may look like the real thing but isn't. Items can range from prescription drugs, shirts and watches to automobile replacement parts. They are often sub-standard, which means they can be potential safety risks. A defective auto part or prescription isn't worth the saving, is it? Heloise Here are a few things to look for to help you avoid buying counterfeit items. Many times they are sold at very low prices or there is incorrect spelling on the package, incorrect spelling of the brand name, no warranty or guarantee. It is against the law to counter- feit items and also to distribute them. If you think you may have bought one, you should contact the United States Customs Service and let them know. It's the only way we will stop this. — Heioise CALENDAR TOWELS Dear Heloise: My friend saved her calendar towels, opened the hems Actors Urge Congress To Preserve Classics WASHINGTON (AP) - Burt Lancaster was the fast-talking tough guy, James Stewart his drawling partner with homespun common sense as they rode into town to fight for a principle — only this time it was real life, not a movie. The two Hollywood legends began a two-day whirl of lobbying in Congress and on television talk shows Tuesday to plead for the preservation of their film classics against modern moguls out to "make a buck." Lancaster shook his finger at a packed room of reporters, argu- ing passionately for a halt to the controversial coloring of black and white films. Media entrepreneur Ted Turner has led the colorization field, releasing computer- colored versions of such classics as "Casablanca" and Stewart's "It's a Wonderful Life." "All of this is done for them to make a buck," said Lancaster. "Let them go out and make an honest buck." Stewart told reporters in his halting cadence that he agreed with Lancaster, "but for me to say the same thing would take so very much longer, I better not say it." The two were joined in their rounds by directors Peter Bogdanovich, Fred Zinneman and several other top American filmmakers. The Hollywood push for legislation included testimony before a congressional committee two weeks ago by directors Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Stewart said he came to Washington because he was appalled by the colorization of Frank Capra's "It's a Wonderful Life," after Turner bought the rights to the movie. Under a plan supported by the Directors Guild of America, those who hold exhibition rights to completed movies would not be allowed to make changes* rating of 11.1, its second-straight victory. ABC's "World News Tonight" had a 10.2 and "NBC Nightly News" had a 9.4. The rating is the percentage of the nation's 88.6 million households with televisions. After a lengthy reign at the top of the news ratings last summer, NBC is now struggling in third, although the close rankings make the news race virtually a three-way tie. NBC analyst Gerald Jaffe said results of the November sweeps showed NBC with a disadvantage in local news lead-in. NBC affiliates had an average rating of 11.5, which "Nightly News" improved on, to 11.9. CBS had the best advantage. Its affiliates had an average rating of 12.9, and the network newscast improved that to 13.1. ABC affiliates averaged a 12.0 rating and the network broadcast was a 12.3. "Network news is an island in a sea of local news," said Jaffe. "If the local news is going down, there's not much you can do to keep the network news from going down, too." Producer Likes Stories About Little Guys LOS ANGELES (AP) Movie producer Robert Cooper likes to tell stories about the little guy pursuing a goal despite seemingly insurmountable odds. His first movie in 1979, "Running," was about a middle-aged man determined to run in the Olympics. "The Terry Fox Story," a television movie for Home Box Office, told of a youth who ran across Canada despite losing a leg to cancer. "The Simon Wiesenthal Story: Murderers Among Us" will follow the story of a man who devoted 40 years of his life to tracking down Nazi war criminals. And "Max and Helen" will show a survivor of the Holocaust who is finally reunited with the woman he loves, but because of a twist of fate cannot testify against the Nazi who brutalized them both. Cooper has pursued his own goals against the odds. At 5-foot-4, he describes himself as a little guy out to prove himself. He grew up in Montreal, where he abandoned his goal of acting to become a lawyer after his father was threatened by gangsters. He set up a storefront law firm, then became a prosecutor fighting organized crime. He later spent six years as host of a Canadian television show called "Ombudsman," which looked into complaints of injustice by its viewers. "The theme of the little guy against the odds has always appealed to me, not only in my films but in my own life," he said. "I think because of my size I developed an early sensitivity to injustice. It's the David and Goliath thing, although some people tell me I use the sling a little too often." "The Simon Wiesenthal Story" goes into production for HBO in Budapest on May 2. and sewed several of them together to make a lovely tablecloth. She put a clear plastic cover over the top and has a real conversation piece. — Mary Roberts, Torigan, Ore. FRAGRANT LIGHT BULBS Dear Heloise: f have one fragrance that I really like. I have found that if I. put a couple of drops on a light bulb it makes the room smell wonderful. I truly didn't believe this would work until I tried it. — Ginny Nettlebom, Hammond, Ind. Send a money- or time-saving hint to Heloise, P.O. Box 795000. I can't answer your letter personally but will use the best hints received in my column. Odds & Ends Associated Press If Argentina had succeeded in capturing the Falkland Islands during its 1982 war with Britain, the islands in the South Atlantic would probably be recognized today as Islas Malvinas. fe?? r "GOOD A MOVIES CASS PUZA 712-nooN .00 All SHOWS Lojoniport J 'GOOD MORNING VIETNAM" 7:20 Only "MERCENARY FIGHTERS'' 7:10 Only (I LIFE OF JIMMY REARDON" 7:30 Only (R "MERCENARY FIGHTERS" Won. -Thur. 7pm f , "FOR KEEPS" POOS Mon- Thur. 7: 15pm — ^ ^ *STARTS FRIDAY* POLICE ACADEMY' *STARTS FRIDAY* Burt Reynoldt In (pol SWITCHING CHANNELS" SPECIALS EACH St. Patrick's Day Party Green Beer & Piz NEW FAMILY ROOM BABE'S PIZZA & LOUNGE 1645 ErieAve. -722 -5002 (under new management)

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