Independent from Long Beach, California on February 24, 1969 · Page 15
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 15

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Long Beach, California
Issue Date:
Monday, February 24, 1969
Page:
Page 15
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LOT* »»db cam., Feb. at. im INDEPENDENT (AM) PRESS-TELEGRAM (PM)-- A-15 (Advertisement) MARINERS WILL VERIFY OR DISPEL MARS LIFE LEGENDS By RALPH D1GHTON PASADENA /B --The Mariner 6 spacecraft scheduled to be launched toward Mars tonight will carry cameras sharp enough to pick out pyramids, ruins of temples, and other geometrical patterns that might be signs of a past civilization. As it flies within 2,000 miles of the mysterious red planet next July 31, Mariner 6 may be able to photograph craters down to 900 feet in diameter, or canals -- if they exist -as narrow as 300 feet across. This forecast of the exciting vistas that would be opened by a successful flight of almost a quarter- billion miles comes from Dr. Robert Leighton, physicist-astronomer of the California Institute of Technology who is chief scientist for the television experiment aboard Mariner 6 and its sister craft, Mariner 7, to be launched a month later. ''We don't expect to determine whether life exists on Mars with these missions," Leighton said in an interview, "but we may be able to establish whether it could exist, or possibly even whether it ever did. "At the worst, we should he able to kill a lot of old legends, such as the ones that say the dark lines seen by some astronomers are really canals carrying water from polar ice caps to oases in the desert, or the ones that say the vast regions that change color every spring are vegetation. "Even with the success of Mariner 4 in 1965, which sent back 21 pictures showing that at least a part of Mars is heavily cratered, we still don't know much about the planet. The legends still live. "What we have done this time is to improve the cameras and aim closer at (he planet, so we can cover as great a num- ber as possible of the features that have given rise to these mysteries. "If there are such things as pyramids, ruins of temples, large geometrical patterns, we should have a belter chance of finding them because we will be covering a miK'h larger area with cameras of much higher resolution." The Mariner 1969 series is the latest in Jet Propulsion Laboratory's program for unmanned exploration of the planets. Two more Mariners are to orbit Mars for three months in 1971. and in 1973 two spacecraft are to land there. The best of Mariner -1's pictures, taken from 6.000 miles out, showed few details smaller than two miles across. They covered only 1 per cent of the planet's surface. Mariners 6 and 7 will photograph 20 per cent of the surface at fairly close range. The Mariners will be launched from Cape Kennedy, Fla., and will be controlled in flight from Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Mariner 6 will travel 226 million miles to reach Mars. Mariner 7 will be fired a month later, but it will be steered en route so that it flies past Mars only five days later than its S50-pound twin. Up to 35% Easier Clinical tests pro7» you e«n now eat and chew b«tter--make denture* average up to Z3% more effective--if you sprlnle t lUtic fASTEgrH on your plates. FASTEETH holds upperm and lowers mo.'ft firmly so the? feel mor* "importable. PASTGTTH is not acid--doesr 'i BOUT. No gummy, pasty taste. Help« cheek "denturt odor". Ventures that lit are essential to if al*.h. So KN? your tntlst re^jlarly. **i FASTKETH at all druz ooun*-eri. APOLLO 9 COUNTDOWN Long Day ior Astronauts CAPE KENNEDY (IIP!) -- The three Apollo 9 astronauts put in another gruelling day of training Sunday and Mission Commander James McDivitt's priest prayed in church for the success of the toughest spaceflight America has attempted. While McDiviU, David R. Scott and Russell L. Schweickart worked toward a Friday blastoff, skipping the usual Sunday day of rest, engineers on oilier launch pads readied a twin-eyed TV probe for launch tonight toward the planet Mars and a weather satellite for a Wednesday morning takeoff. It promised to be one of the busiest weeks ever in the nation's space program. Before joining his crew mates at mid-morning in the spacecraft trainer that simulates space conditions, McDivitt left the spaceport long enough to attend mass at the Catholic Church of Our Savior in nearby Cocoa Beach. Father Vincent Smith added a special prayer to the mass: "AGAIN our astronauts are about to journey into space. Watcli over them, oh, Lord. Grant that their journey will be successful and bring them back safely to us." Father Smith said that McDivitt paused after the service to greet the priest, then hustled back to the Space Center. "He said lie was in a hurry to get in some prac- tice," the priest said. McDivitt, Scott and Schweikart have been following a hectic training schedule that spares little time for rest and relaxation. "We've been working long hours," McDivitt said in an interview, and Sunday was no exception. Apollo 9's mission during its 10 days of earth orbital flight is to give the spindly-legged moon-landing spacecrat- which the astronauts n i c k n a m e d "Spider"--its i n i t i a l manned space test. THE PRACTICE Sunday concentrated m a i n l y on operations of the Apollo 9 command ship. For the past two days the astronauts also have rehearsed thoroughly the lunar module landing vehicle's all- important rendezvous maneuvers, scheduled for the fifth day of the mission. The gawky Spider will fly up to 100 miles from the command ship in a critical test of the operations moon pilots must perform in lunar orbit. Project officials say the rendezvous and all other tests planned for the flight make the mission of Apollo 9 the most difficult yet tried. It must be successful to clear the way for a moon orbit flight in May and a landing in July. Apollo 9 is scheduled to blast off on a towering Saturn 5 rocket at 8 a.m. PST Friday, and project officials reported Sunday that the long countdown was proceeding without a hitch. It began early Saturday. (Advertisement) OUTSTANDING CAREER OPPORTUNITY IN REAL ESTATE SALES Licensed or unlicensed. Excellent sales training program. An opportunity to earn up to $25,000 a year and moro in real estate with a multi-million dollar organization. Highest commissions, paid immediately; choice commercial and residential property; good financing on easy terms; free closing help. Interviewing Weekdays 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Cull fur an »;/uiirifrnmf. APPLE VALLEY RANCHOS 3590 LONG BEACH BLVD. PHONE: 427-0989 insured savings 5.13% is what you actually earn when the passbook rate is 5% and is compounded daily and maintained fora year. INTEREST COMPOUNDED DAILY You earn on additional 1/4°. per annum over our current passbook rato of 5% par annum by investing in a throe-year bonus certificate. Should you withdraw your Funds prior lo lh» throe year torrn .you still earn our current passbook rate. EARNINGS PAID 4 TIMES A YEAR Funds received by the 10th of any month earn from the first of tho month. Funds received after the I Oth earn from the date of receipt. Funds earn to the date of withdrawal. (FEDERAL SAVINGS OF LONG BEACH NOT THE LARGEST-JUST ONE OF THE BEST Open Until Bt··*·*«· I MBB.BV P H O N E t F. M. Fridoyt FBRST and PINE HEmlock. 7-1211 F R E E ' PAR'tU'-NC 135 E. OCEAN AVE. i At Our Rear Entrance F R E E P - A R K I N C SHOULDERS AND LEGS ACHE? Long Bench--Poor circulation, join pains, muscle spasm. Normalising! systems of hoily assists pain to leave joints; muscles rcln\-, nerves quiet down. Desire to work- n£;iin. For appt. GE H-2.fO.i- Or. Duncan, D.C., 2MH L Broadway. Dooley's Super Special CR932W Contemporary. Walnut Grained Cabinet. BIGXOINCH 295 SQ. IN. PICTURE, LARGEST COLOR TUBE MADE diag. meas. COLOR TV CONSOLE 25000 Volts picture power, Transistorued UHF tuner, Set-N-Forget VHF fine tuning, front speaker and UHF loop antenna. DOOLEY'S SALE PRICE: FREE DELIVERY, 90 DAYS SERVICE IN YOUR HOME, 2 YEARS PICTURE TUBE GUARANTEE AND 1-YEAR PARTS GUARANTEE) Packard Bell C0968 Mediterranean Spanish 1969*Mod'els Compare Dooley's LOW PRICES! DOOLEY'S Hinte HJ 50/s LONG BIA'CHBLVD -NORTH LONG BFJCH Which cooks better-aflame The chef recommends. Perino's chef cares only about superb food--and he cooks with gas. So does Chasen's chef. And Scandia's chef. Gas gives thorn quicker % response, more s *i . precise control. 97% of all chefs agree- ttiey, too, cook with gas. Let's come clean. Which kind of range is cleaner? The simple truth is that with all gas ranges you broil ..with the broiler door closed tight. With an electric range, you leave the door partly open. Think of all that greasy smoke! Think of the kitchen ceiling! How can they say electric ranges are cleaner? The teakettle race. This teakettle with 1 ....-' cup of water whistles in less than 2 minutes on this gas range, on "High." This same teakettle takes more than 3 minutes to whistle on a deluxe 1969 electric range, also on "High." When people claim electric cooking is faster, it makes us do a slow burn. Over-easy... or overdone? When you turn off the gas flame under the eggs, it's off. It doesn't go on glowing like an electric coil. The eggs don't go on cooking. Saucns don't go on boiling--or worse yet, sticking to the pot. Electric ranges are more m o d e r n -- h a ! KSE'iSl Somebody has been j^-U^ '-^----- ' handing you a line. | .--.-- -' Money talks, too. It t IS50 j costs an average | : --::.-...: family of four $27.00 ^^ J ayearforfuel to cook .with an electric range. But only 59.00 (1 /3 aj much) to cook with gasj i If you are a perfectly sensational cook, youj could probably fix at sensational meal on a co.i!« burning, pot-bellied stove. And surely on ;ir» electric range. Our point is that the same f.re.it meal is a lot easier to achieve on a gas range. For all the many reasons given above. Perino's chef agrees: that's why he cooks with gas. And so do over Sb c ,'c of women inourwhole Southern California serving area. IMC « ' gas W CCMP-V.

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