The Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune from Chillicothe, Missouri on September 5, 1906 · Page 1
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The Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune from Chillicothe, Missouri · Page 1

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Chillicothe, Missouri
Issue Date:
Wednesday, September 5, 1906
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Page 1
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XICOTHE C OL. XVII NO. 295 Mo., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 1906 DAILY EDITION PRICE FIVE CENTS THAT U/HEN YOU SE/YD Ybup-- CHILDREN To S'CHOOL.GOOD CLONES £RE AS ESSENTIAL AS GOOD JcHooL BOOKS - YOU KNOW THAT A WELL DRESSED CMILD TAKESflacH /MORE: INTEREST IN lit 5TUDIE5- AIYD DE^RTfACHER SHOULD BEGIN TtRM WITH NEW CLOTHES. WHERE You ff£TTHE BEST .TB/Ytf /) R/TH/W/9. 3U5TER BROWN. i. jmxK/ 38 ^ KA ^4Mf ! ) TTGESLESSod FRONTIER SHOW DELIGHTS BIG AUDIENCE Biding and Hoping Contests Bring Forth Marvelous S kill of Wyoming Performers IJ NOT DREEING WELL ONE OF THE 5E.ST YOUR, CHILDREN CAN LEARN? HOW MUCH MORE INTEREST THEY WILL TAKE IN THEIR 50CK S IF THEY ARE NoT BOTHER.ED BY KNOWIN6 THEIR -SCHOOL MATE-5 HAVE ON BETTER CLoTHE.5 THAN THEY HAVE. BE*SIDE.5 IN AFTER LIFE THEY WILL 6ET ALONG BETTER IF THEY KNOW HOW To APPEAR. WELL. V/HoM Do YoU PATRONIZE, THE .SHABBY OR THE WELL CLAD? WE WI-SH To ENCOURAGE EDUCATION, THEREFORE WE -SELL OUR WEARABLES FOR LITTLE -STUDENT MEN FOR VERY REA-SoNABLEPRoFIT-5. <300D -5UIT-S FROM $2.00 To $5.00. WE CARRY EVERYTHING LITTLE MEN WEAR. -5IPPLE CLOTHING Co. EYE BADLY INJURED. Orvillo McClcod, a member of the Milwaukee fencing crew, met with a painful accident ?t Ludlow Tuesday afternoon. He was driving a nail with a hammer when ho hit the nail a glancing blown and it flew back striking him in the left eyn. Ho came to Chillicbthe on tha Milwaukesdude undhaa his eye | dressed. The iujurr may destroy the sight of his left eye. WILL GIVE MATINEE "The Homcseekers" company which comes to the Luella Grand Saturday night will give a matinee performance at2:30 Saturday afternoon. The admission will be )5 and 25ceota. -ar- ONLY Ten m SEVENTY-FIVE CENTS TO New Dress Ginghams FLEECED GOODS, PER YD. ONLY New Cloaks for Women, Misses and Children. Big lot of New Clothing. Trade at UTe Farmers' Store and save money. "Leaders ef Low Prises" The first performance of the Wyoming Wild West show, given by the Chillicothe Industrial League for the entertainment of the«ityig guests during the Good Roads convention, was attended by a crowd of 1500 persons. The general verdict was that it was the fineot exhibition of the kind ever in Cnillicothe, and Chillicothe has had the best of them including Buffalo Bill. Marvelous exhibitions of riding and roping delighted the big audience. Several accidents happened to the performers during the course of the afternoon, bul they were accustomed to these,and as they were not injured, they only served to add excitement to the regular features. Manager Irwin was kicked by his horse. The audience feared that he was hurt but he was on his feet in a moment.smilinf;; and bowiug to the audience. The broncos that this show has are genuine unbroken hordes, and a bucking cow is also tho real thiug, as was shown by the rupid ity with which she unseated an ambitious local rider, Tuesday. Many farmers who saw the show Tuesday declared that they were corning back with their entire families later in the week. There is absolutely nothing to offend. A Chillicothe preacher who was present Tuesday declared it one of the most enjoyable performances he had ever seen. FOR RENT 3 nice rooms ensuite, suitable for light housekeeping Supplied with water, sink and closet. North Locust street near the square. Also, one large room, second story over Reynolds Book store on Locust street. One 4-room dwelling near Central school Duilding. ANDREW LEEPER. Office over Baskett's Jewelry store. 5sd6t BEST TERM OPENING. Monday was the opening day for the school year at the Normal, and it was the best term opening that the school has ever had. More students are enrolled now than have been enrolled at this stage of the term in the school history, and more are arriving on every train. This promises to be the biggeat year that this popular nstitution has ever enjoyed. CORN-SPROUT. Marriage license was issued Wednesday morning to James Corn of Wheeling and Sarah Sprout of Gait. They were married at the home of the officiating minister, J. N. Crutcher, at 1 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. SMALL BLAZE. The fire department was called to the home of A. Martin on Herri ford street at 11:30 Wednesday morning. The fire was in the roof of a summer kitchen but was extinguished before any damage was done. The Martin home is outside of the fire circuit. MOVED TO KANSAS CITY- Mr. and Mrs. Frank Barker were in the city Wednesday on route to Kansas City where they will make their future home. Mr. Harker moved his family to Laredo after the Milwaukee division was moved from this city to that place. STUDENTS TO COLUMBIA. The Livingston county students who attended the State University last year are preparing to return to Columbia. They will leave here the first of the week to be there for'the opening day, which is September 11. BRYAN SCORES SULLIVAN Chicago, Sept. 5—William Jennings Bryan as the guest of the local Democracy, delivered today within eight hours two addresses. His first speech, which was made at a luncheon given in his honor by the members of the Iroquois Club, dealt entirely with the political issues [and the economic qnestions of the day. The second speech, which was made at a banquet given in his honor by the Jefferson Club, was devoted to National Committeman Roger C. Sullivan, of Illinois, whose resignation Mr, Bryan had demanded, but who was indorsed by the recent state convention which also declared itself in ; favor of Mr. Bryan as the next Democratic nominee for President. Mr. Bryan not only scored J Sullivan and his political methods unmercifully, but informed the Democrats present, many of whom were delegates to the recent state convention, that if they [accepted Mr. Sullivan they could not indorse him in any way. He informed them emphatically that he would have none of the approval of the Democrats of Illinois, and that he repudiated their recent in- dorsement of him. CONVENTION ORATORS NEW ROAD LAWS GOVERNOR STILL SICK. la a telephone message from Jefferson City to the CONSTITUTION Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 Hal Woodside. secretary to the Governor, stated that Governor Folk was still confined to his bed with illness. Mr. Woodside said that the Governor waa keenly dis appointed at his inability to attend the Good Roads convention. KNOCKED FROM ENGINE. Fireman G. W. Brexton on the Burlington, who was firing' on a west bound freight train was knocked from the coal tender by the water crane Wednesday morning in the local yards ajd a deep gash cut in his head. He was badly bruised about the legs. A physician was called and dressed the wounds and he was sent to his homo in Brookfield Wednesday noon. BAND GAVE DRILL. The Cameron Military band, which is playing for the Good Roads convention, gave a drill on North Washington street in front of the fire house Wednesday morning. Tho drill was witnessed ay a large crowd. The Cameron band is the best drilled band outside of the Third Regiment band n the state. TO STAY A WET TOWN. Springfield, Mo., Sept. 4.— pringfleld today voted for a wet own by a majority of 1,606 votes. On y 1,391 voters favored prohibi- n. The vote was very light, being only about two-thirds of the e ^istered vote of the city at the ast regular election. TflARRJEifAf NOON. Charles Dickinson of Laredo ind Miss Viola Wilson were mar- ied at noon Wednesday at the home of Wesley Myers, Mr. J. N. rutch r performing the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson left soon after the ceremony for a two weeks' trip through Colorado. CONCERT WAS EN JOYED. The band concert given by the ameron. military band in Elm park Tuesday-evening was heard >y a large and appreciative audience. The music was good. THE WEATHER Fair tonight and Thursday. The Place To Learn Shorthand, Bookkeeping or Telegraphy is Jflaupin's College 130 former students from Livingston county holding posi- iicrjs, Tell your friends. URGE Declare This Necessary Before Good Work Can Be Done—Walter Williams Tonight. Tuesday night's session of tho Good Roads convention was an interesting one. A number of new arrivals were noticeable including Dr. R. H. Jesse, president of the Missouri State University, Columbia, and H. J. Waters, dean of the State Agricultural college at Columbia. Soon after the meeting convened it was voted that the chair should appoint a committee of three on credentials and of seven on resolutions. John Howatt of Clarksville,Mo., spoke of tho deficiency and complication in Missouri's road laws, and the remedy needed. He said that he would like to see the present road law obliterated, because it was confusing and contradictory. He would like to see a state road commission, one of which should be a practical engineer. He also recommend a law providing for competent road officers in couutics, aud a road tax payable in cash, so that tho road work could bo done by experienced men and done systematically. He expressed tho opinion that Missouri would have to do with dirt roads for many years to come, and urged the careful grading of roads, praising the split-log drag. The talk of Judge C.I. Dempsey of Bowling Green,which followed, had to do with the improvements needed in theroad system. Judge Dempsey spoke in favor of a rigid assessment law. He said he would like to see property assessed 60 per cent instead of 40. If this were done there would be no need of a constitutional amendment to provide road funds. He did not believe such a constitutional amendment would carry over the opposition of the people in the three largo cities in this state. He suggested that the present road law be repealed, or a great part of it, and that the legislature enact a law which wouldconstitute every township a road district. He would have a county board, one member at large aud one from ach township, whose duty should be to build roads and keep them n good condition. The small road district, he said, was too small. Roads must be;in somewhere and have an ob- ective point, and this could not be done in a small district. Judge Dompsey is strongly in avor of rock roads, and he favors county bond issues for building hem. He suggested that the pro- >osed county road commission of a given county should map out a general road system for the county, showing that the entire county would benefit from the expenditure, and that the bonds then be submitted to a vote. W. R. Goit of Kansas City gave what probably vvill be one of the most practical talks that tho convention will hear, his subject be- ng "Road Drainage." He illustrated his talk with tho use of a blackboard, and showed his audience how to put in tiling and culverts, how to grade roads effectively, how to avoid hills, and imparted much other valuable information. It is to be regretted that Mr. Goit's talk could not have heard by every road overseer in Missouri. Tuesday morning was devoted to road building. Work was done on the Linueus road, oast of Highview, and on the south Utica road, about a mile being built in each place. Great crowds went out to witness the demonstrations. The afternoon sassion Wednesday was held in the Luella theatre. A paper was read by F. M. Filson, postmaster at Cameron. F. J. Spalding, dean of the engineering department of the Missouri State University, spoke of "The Value of Skilled Supervision in Road Work." His talk was very practical and drew out a number of questions from his hearers and a general discussion followed. A, M. Joijoson, highway of the Illinois road department, giving the Missourians some valuable suggestions. A fine program has been arranged for tonight at the Luella theatre. Tho chief feature will be an address on "Missouri and Good Roads" by Walter Williams of Columbia. Mr. Williams arrived in the city today. B. E. Zimmerman, of Savannah, Mo., county clerk of Andrew county, will read a paper and G. W. Donaghey of Conway, Ark., an experienced road contractor, will speak on "How to Build Roads.' 1 Tomorrow afternoon speakers will be Dr. R. H. Jesse and Senator W. J. Stone. HOG" "MARKET LOWER CONSTITUTION Special. Kansas City, Sept. 5 — The live stock market for today, as reported by Clay, Robinson & Co., was as follows: Cattle — Receipts 9,500; market slow; best steady ; others lower; top §0:00. Hogs— Receipts 7,500; market 5 .to 15c lower; bulk_S6.00 to S6.20; top §6.25. Sheep — Receipts 9,500; market steady. Chicago, Sept. 5 — Cattle — Receipts 25,000; market ^10c lower. Top SG.75. Hogs— Receipts 36,000; market 10 to 15c lower. BUSINESS HOUSES TO CLOSE Nearly all the business houses and the banks will close at noon Thursday in order to attend the Good Roads convention and the Wild West show at tho fair grounds. Thursday will be the banner day. Bugs Denny was arrested by the police and turned over to the state Wednesday on a tstate warrant charging Denny with shooting craps. Denny was released on bond for his appearance before Judge Johnston Saturday. CHARCEDWiSfASSAULT A state warrant was issued late Tuesday evening for the arrest bi Sherman Stanberry charged with assaulting H. B. Hewitt. Ho gave bond for his appearance before Judge Johnston Saturday. THE TEXAS WONDER Cures all Kidney, Bladder and Rheumatic troubles. Sold by all druggists or two months' treatment by mail for SI. Dr. E. W. Hall. 2926 Olive street, St. Louis, Mo. Send for Mo. testimonials. Hood's Sarsaparilla cures radically — that is, it removes the roots of disease. That's bettor than .oppiiig the branches. G. A. McBride went to Texas WANT THE LOWENSTEIN PRODUCE HOUSE MOVED Say it is Not in a Sanitary Condition—Health Board Will Take TJp Matter At Its Meeting The board of health was notified Wednesday morning that the A. Lowenstein produce house on North Locust street waa in an unsanitary condition. The matter will be taken up at the meeting of the board Thursday evening when a notice will be served on Mr. Lowenstein that he must keep his place of business in a sanitary condition. The citizens who made the complaint to the board of health wanted the produce company to move its building outside of the city limits. "That will be entirely out of the question," said a member of the board, "but we will see that the building is put in a sanitary condition." This is the first complaint made to the board for a numb or of weeks. The members of the board have done unusually good work this summer In keeping the city in a healthful condition. The weeds which were a menace in the early part of the summer are all cut. The Milbank pond which several kicks had been registered against is being cleaned and in fact all places in the city declared a nuisance by the board have been put in good shape. Fine cling peaches and pears oOcts to SI a bushel. Phone 578 before 8 a. m. J. W. Green. tf CJ jS^ & *3? «> SI I .A.. Boars tie ^ Tiia Kind You HavHIrajS BougM Signature of on a busines trip Tuesday. Ghi-t)amel Demonstration You are cordially invited to attend and witness a demonstration and tests of Chi-Namel, the best interior wood finish, at our store this week, Sept. 3, 4, 5 and (i. Chi-Narnel is a varnish made to walk upon, it will withstand boiling water, thumping, pound- ins? or scraping without marring its' beautiful gloss. No other will. Don't fail to see the tests of the greatest varnish of the age. Clark's Pharmacy ..Henrietta Building.. CHILLICOTHE, MISSOURI. "Yes" or "No?" "Today men's judgments are based largely upon the introductory first glance"-says a well-known writer. Whether your answer be favorable or unfavorable depends a great deal on your personal appearance and nothing can . help you more in this respect than Clothes made by the house of Kuppenheimer, and sold by us. Copyright 1906 The House of Kuppenheimer Kuppenheimer Clothes have style, snap and a certain elegance in material and fit which any man will find an advantage and a help both in a business way and socially. They will enable you to dress perfectly at a reasonable outlay. Prices $15.00 to $30.00. STARKEY Successor po CABPEJlT?B»TABKEy!

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